What's a good way to get rid of rain surface rust on tools left outside

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I always use WD40 on tools when I put them away. Especially ones I use infrequently. Good for garden tools too.
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Motor oil works fine. For more delicate stuff like firearms, light oils lik e "Rem Oil," which comes in a nice spray can is excellent. For longer term storage, I like Hoppe's Rust Inhibiting grease. Just apply with a rag in ei ther case.
WD-40 (let the flames begin) is basically kerosene and some sort of solvent carrier. Nice for cleaning stuff up, but minimal rust inhibiting qualities . I live on the DE shore, and salt air is not your friend here. I take all my tools off of the tool board/tool boxes about once every 6 months and wip e them down. Saves a lot of grief.
I have used Naval Jelly on really bad cases, but in general, oil and fine s teel wool seems to be satisfactory. If finish damage is a possibility, I be lieve some people suggest bronze wool, which won't scratch as much.
For some stuff, I've used "Instant Cold Gun Blue" to put a more permanent f inish (you still need oil) on some small tools.
/paul W3FIS
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On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 13:49:33 -0800 deadgoose38 wrote:

I never understood WD-40 versus plain old motor oil. So I have a can, but I never use it. It lasts forever that way. :)

You'll note that I used a bronze toothbrush (see center in the picture below).

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Forget that. EvapoRust is what you want. Amazing stuff. Seriously. http://www.evaporust.com/
--
Tegger

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I clicked the link that said "Click here to read more about Evapo-Rust rust remover", and it told me this:
"How Evapo-rust affects coatings
"EVAPO-RUST is highly recommended by the NRA gunsmithing school and is utilized by FBI, CIA, NATO and other law enforcement and forensics agencies. EVAPO-RUST is perfect for removing oxide weapon finishes such as Bluing, Parkerizing, Zinc Phosphate, and Browning.
"Anodizing, Cobalt Tungsten Carbide, Powder Coating, Chrome, Nickel, Paint, and most other coatings will not be removed as long as they do not contain oxides. EVAPO-RUST will not harm lead or solder points."
So it appears that if your barrels have an oxide finish (bluing, etc), Evapo-rust will take the bluing off. In other words, NOT safe for oxide finishes. It appears that Evapo-Rust will remove ANY form of oxide.
--
Tegger

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Danny D. wrote:

Rust Removal using Electrolysis http://antique-engines.com/electrol.asp
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Zen wrote:

The problem with electrolysis is that the result will rust quicker (unless you protect it).
Here is a naval jelly "secrets of surface rust removal revealed" http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/secrets-surface-rust-removal-revealed-55679.html
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Harry:
You could probably save yourself some money here.
Oren's recommendation of Loctite's Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver utilizes a well known chemical reaction between rust and phosphoric acid that converts the rust into a black compound called Ferric Phosphate or FePO4.
Here's what Wikipedia says about using Phosphoric acid to convert rust to Ferric Phosphate:
_________________________________________________________________________________
'Phosphoric acid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphoric_acid)
Rust removal: Phosphoric acid may be used as a "rust converter", by direct application to rusted iron, steel tools, or surfaces. The phosphoric acid converts reddish-brown iron(III) oxide, Fe2O3 (rust) to black ferric phosphate, FePO4.
"Rust converter" is sometimes a greenish liquid suitable for dipping (in the same sort of acid bath as is used for pickling metal), but it is more often formulated as a gel, commonly called "naval jelly". It is sometimes sold under other names, such as "rust remover" or "rust killer". As a thick gel, it may be applied to sloping, vertical, or even overhead surfaces.
After treatment, the black ferric-phosphate coating can be scrubbed off, leaving a fresh metal surface. Multiple applications of phosphoric acid may be required to remove all rust. The black phosphate coating can also be left in place, where it will provide moderate further corrosion resistance (such protection is also provided by the superficially similar Parkerizing and blued electrochemical conversion coating processes).
_________________________________________________________________________________
So, I took a look at the MSDS for Loctite Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver, and sure enough it's mostly phosphoric acid. It's got 10 to 30 percent phosphoric acid in it. It's got some other stuff in it too, but those other things are to gel it so that it can be applied to vertical surfaces and overhead:
'Household Products Database - Health and Safety Information on Household Products' (http://tinyurl.com/bfjgnv8 )
Now, phosphoric acid is commonly used as the active ingredient in toilet bowl cleaners. If you just go down to your local home center or hardware store and look at the toilet bowl cleaners they sell, many of them will give a phosphoric acid content, or have a warning saying that it contains phosphoric acid.
Here's a phosphoric acid based toilet bowl cleaner being marketed by a company called "Iowa Prison Industries":
http://www.iaprisonind.com/downloads/msds/IPI-PhosAcidBowl.pdf
If Loctite Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver has a phosphoric acid content of 10 to 30 percent, you can use any phosphoric acid toilet bowl cleaner with a phosphoric acid content between 10 and 30 percent to get identical results as you'd get with the Loctite product.
Many toilet bowl cleaners will contain hydrochloric acid, but you want to use phosphoric acid for converting rust into that stable black compound, ferric phosphate.
Also, EVERY janitorial supply store listed under "Janitorial Equipment & Supplies" will, in all certainty, sell a phosphoric acid toilet bowl cleaner you can use on your tools.
Phosphoric acid is a mild acid. It's about the same strength as CLR. It won't harm your tools if you leave it on too long, but doing that won't remove any more rust. Once the rust turns black, just wash the remaining phosphoric acid off your tools with water and dry immediately with a rag or paper towels.
Rubbing oil over the ferric phosphate won't do anything, and it'll only make dirt stick to your tools. I would leave out the business about applying oil to anything because as soon as you use that tool, the oil film will get wiped/rubbed off anyway. Just keep your tools dry.
--
nestork


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nestork wrote:

That PDF says to empty the toilet bowl of water.
How do they accomplish that?
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No shit?
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Often if you turn off the water supply and put a bucket of water in the toilet bowl most of the water will go down the drain similar to when you flush it.
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nestork wrote:

The PDF says it "Removes rust, lime and organic deposits".
Clearly it removes rust - but HOW does it remove calcium oxide (aka lime) and what does it mean by organic deposits (other than carbohydrates)?
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2013 06:02:28 +0000, Ripple Whine wrote:

I have no idea, but googling, I see that phosphoric acid reacts with calcium oxide to form calcium phosphate and water. http://www.chegg.com/homework-help/questions-and-answers/calcium-hydroxide-phosphoric-acid-react-form-calcium-phosphate-water-q1594465
So the question is really why would we want to convert toilet bowl limescale to toilet bowl calcium phosphate [Ca2(PO4)3].
Offhand, my guess is that mixing the acid plus the base, nets a salt which is (I'm guessing) soluble in water - hence easily cleaned.
Since my shower stall is VERY stained with hard water deposits, I might try it (but I generally use LimeAway) as a separate experiment for the team.
The MSDS for Lime Away says it's 2.5 to 10% Sulfamic Acid (CAS 5329-14-6). http://www.rbnainfo.com/MSDS/US/LIME-A-WAY-Cleaner-Trigger-US-English.pdf
I have never heard of Sulfamic Acid but Wikipedia says it's used to remove rust and lime by converting them to soluble calcium and iron salts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfamic_acid
I'm guessing that the phosphoric acid mixes with the lime to create a salt which is then washed away by dissolving in water.
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__ ______

__ ______

ads/msds/IPI-PhosAcidBowl.pdf

the oil

Well as I am in the UK many of these products are not available or have different names. However we do (unfortunately) have Coca Cola. I have heard it will remove rust. (Phosphoric acid,) The problem with acid treatments is it can affect cutting edges, especially on stuff like saws.
WD40 is much faster to apply than rubbing on oil. Some tools are meant to get wet (eg garden spades) WD40 has worked fine with me for years, just give stuff a quick waft when I put it away. I have a 5litre can of the stuff and a manual refillable aerosol. BTW, WD40 is made in the US.
You can make your own by mixing kerosine and lubricating oil too.
BTW you Yanks spell sulphur as sulfur. Why don'tyou spel phosphoric as fosforic?
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2013 00:19:55 -0800, harry wrote:

That's a good one for alt.english.usage to handle! :)
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That English phellow sure phinds phalt with every phreaking thing that us phrugal home repair pholks phinish with.
Christoffer A. Yung Phind mo bout Jezuz www.el-dee-ess.borg (Redneck J man of Home Depot) .
On Sat, 23 Feb 2013 00:19:55 -0800, harry wrote:

That's a good one for alt.english.usage to handle! :)
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What the hell is "rain surface rust," elephant arse?
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THE COLONEL wrote on %D

Surface rust from rain perhaps?
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Pretty stupid way of puttin' it, pumpkin head.
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2013 09:25:42 -0800, THE COLONEL wrote:

The word "arse" is a wonderful example of "British english", versus the "American English" three-letter equivalent.
However, your use of the word "hell" should be capitalized.
Moreover, a "pumpkin head" would seem to be a particularly American English appellation; should you more appropriately call him a "damson head?"
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