What paint works on a Cast Iron Tub?

A couple years after buying my home I realized the previous owner had painted over the original color of my cast iron bathtub. After using a shower mat for too long, the paint peeled off the tub floor reveling the original color... PINK! No matter what I use for paint, I wouldn't expect it to last forever. That said, what kind of paint should I use? Is there a special purpose paint for this kind of thing? Also, is there anything special I should use to chemically remove what's left of the old paint? I'm not sure what chemicals might damage the original cast iron tub finish.
Thank you.
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They make kits for new paint. Yes, it won't last; it's best to just replace the tub. And I have no idea how to get off the old paint. I've tried everything and nothing works good.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

you need a 2 part paint. I use the 2 part ben moore floor paint and love i. would it work on a tub? dunno. If not automotive 2 part.
never use comet after...........
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wrote:

Epoxy paint, available in white but can be tinted. Before applying sand with wet sand paper to remove sheen and smooth over any defects. Clean with acetone or denatured alcohol to remove any trace of soap or oils. Look for an epoxy filler for dings and deep chipouts.
If you really want a thorough job, sand blasting is the only method that will clean it all off (at least the paint, maybe not the porcelain). You can also hire a contractor to spray a better quality epoxy paint on for the best look without replacing.
There is a market for used clawfoot cast iron tubs, especially classic designs. Call a scrap yard before you throw it out. They at least might come and remove it for free if not pay you a small amount.
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Had ours done professionally a few years back and its still in perfect shape.
When you sell these tubs to resellers they refinish them, so you can too.
Google Tub refinishers, there are franchises everywhere. They will come and give you a quote for what is needed and the company I used did have a good warranty.
They use heavy equipment type paint that is used on big equipment like bull dozers etc. This paint can withstand hitting with a hammer, It is a two part process and you MUST protect yourself, definitely not a DIY project unless your accustomed to these commercial paints, chemicals.
BTW, they don't remove the tub either, they will have it done usually in five hours and in 48 hours you can use the tub.
Rich
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Pink tubs sell for big money in SanFrancisco.........
On 19 Dec 2005 11:11:56 -0800, "Mak Wilson"

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Bah Humbug. If you have an air compressor and a paint gun, you can refinish it yourself with the right paint. Neighbor of mine did it and it looks perfect.
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consider than refinishing a dresser.
To spray a 2 part epoxy paint you need an expensive HVLP air gun with the capability to mix the hardner at the tip (not the tank) in the correct ratio (you will waste paint experimenting to set this right). If you mix the paint first then put it through a sprayer, that will be the last time you ever use that sprayer because the paint will harden in the works permenantly (as in epoxy). You will also have more difficulty locating the best epoxy paint because it may not be stocked in hardware stores but available through the trade (specialty supply stores or direct from manuf). Fortunately the internet should be a useful tool for locating such a paint.
I bought an epoxy paint at a local hardware store (OSH) to cover a composite sink surface and it is pretty hard but it is not very stan resistant. Just about anything will stain it (I can still use bleach to clean though). It is chip resistant but the gloss can be scratched easily by abrasive cleaners. It is also susceptable to brush marks because it goes on very thick, brushing or rolling a tub would probably give unsatisfactory results. Sorry I forget the brand but it came in a tan box in quart size with a small container of hardner (not a 50/50 mix at all) My point, the pro grade stuff probably works a lot better.
Any non epoxy paint can be damaged by solvents and will wear faster. Some spray paints for metal may give satisfactoruy results for a couple of years if you are looking for a temporary patch.
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