What kind of work can you do yourself?

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Aaron wrote:

I happen to be in Ohio. Just a few miles from me you can do almost anything you like without a permit and no one cares. Where I am you better have that permit. The difference is I am in a city and not far away it it farm land and I guess they don't bother even trying to get those farmers to pull permits.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Aaron wrote:

Absolutely, even in the Northeast region. However, be prepared to be scrutinized more heavily by the inspectors. You also accept all responsibility if things go wrong. They assume you don't know what you are doing even if you do. They are there to protect you, your family and your home. Once you prove to them you know what you are doing, they typically ease up. The inspectors are there to help you with your project. If you pressed for time, I suggest that you hire a professional. Here are some tips I have used and would like to pass on: 1. Do things right, be prepared and ask if you unsure. 2. Be patient, respectful, courteous and non-confrontational with the entire building department, they are people too. They can be a wealth of information. 3. Submit detailed plans, have them approved and try not to deviate much from them. If you do deviate, revise and resubmit the plans. 4. Ask questions about codes that you are not familiar with, especially plumbing and electrical. 5. Ask questions about their process, which inspection do you want and when. 6. Don't say things like "My taxes pay your salary" or "that is not how I interpreted the code to be". It is not your job to interpret the code book, it is theirs. 7. Thank them for their time.
I hope this helps
Ed B
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Ed B wrote: ..

Have you noticed that those who tend to complain about inspectors often are the same ones who don't believe they should be required to comply with electrical codes or plumbing codes because they don't understand why the code is written the way it is.
Please note that I am not suggesting that all code enforcement and local codes are reasonable. Some of the writers may well be reporting their local situation. I have experienced a few of those situations myself.
--
Joseph Meehan

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On 2/27/06 8:15 PM, in article 7MKdnWoj06DMOZ7ZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com,

I'm in Central New York, rural area south of Syracuse. I bought a house that was "livable" and had good siding, but otherwise was a POS. I tore the whole thing apart, new wiring, plumbing, doors, windows, everything. The whole time I was working I kept expecting someone to come over asking to see my permit (that I didn't have). The renovations are done now, and still nothing.
I think permits are "required" because the local government wants to: 1) know what you're doing so if your property value goes up, they can increase you assessment 2) make sure your neighbors are going to complain when it's done 3) make sure you don't make some horrible mistake that will cause death or injury to yourself or others..
You should have seen the things the previous owner did in *his* renovation of this house (wiring on the outside of the wall, then into the wall, to power an outlet), and so on and so on..
Permits are a good idea in general, but if you're confident in your own work, and you don't think anyone is going to bother you about *not* getting one, I wouldn't worry about it..
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wrote:

Yea, but consider the number of Bubbas out there who are confident of their own work, and well... lets say over confident.
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Joseph Meehan

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(snip)
Chuckle. My house resembles that remark. The decor is bad enough, but at least that isn't dangerous. The wiring, on the other hand- half the outlets reverse-polarity, and the open-lidded junction box in the attic where the wire nuts went 'sproing' when I touched it, the buried splice in the run to the medicine cabinet, the unclamped cable feeding the fart fan that was blowing directly into the insulation, the butchered cabinet that has a large air leak to attic above the stove where they installed the built-in micro - need I go on? I won't say that the work I am slowly doing is craftsman quality, especially the electrical cable fishing, but it is a damn sight better than what I ripped out, and it is at least safe, even if it isn't pretty. I'll be calling in a pro for the HVAC replacement- I don't have a warm fuzzy about doing that myself.
aem sends....
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There are reasons, rationalizations, and uses for permitting, and none of the three particularly resembles the other.
And then there are reasons why the permitting is done the way it's done, which usually boils down to money and effort.
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Aaron Wrote: > I realize local ordinances vary but in general is a home owner allowed > to do

yes, most local ordinances allow general home repair to be done without special approval. however, often times local ordinances will require approval on a task which might seem trivial. For example some require permits to build a loft in a bedroom. Others have restrictions on materials and colors of roofing, siding and stone that you can use on your exterior.
One of the funniest ordinances I have heard of is that based upon the International Code Counsil you are allowed to have older windows in your house , but if you make any type of renovation or remodel you aren't allowed to use those same windows again. Even if you are just transeferring them to a different part of the house.
all-in-all, if you aren't sure you're allowed to be doing it, you might as well check the books
--
GeorgeH

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In the USA you can not do anything yourself. In other countries where people have freedom, you can do anything.
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