What kind of plug is this?

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Hi,
We just bought a used washing machine and when we brought it home we realized that it has an unusual plug that will not our outlet. You can see it here:
http://www.math.drexel.edu/~pg/plug.jpg
Will we be able to connect our washing machine to the existing outlet (which is three prong /L\\and this plug is four prong).
Very many thanks in advance!
pashag
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Must be a hell of a washing machine. That's a 30 amp four wire. It appears by your symbol that your outlet is 30 amp three wire. If you have a four wire cable feeding the outlet, you can change the receptacle to match the cord set, if not, you can probably replace the cord set with a three wire to match the existing receptacle, although I would check with the manufacturer to be sure. On some model appliances they require separate neutral and ground conductors

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Find the mfr label on the machine (back side or maybe underneath) which lists the name, model # and the voltage requirement. Post that info here.
Jim
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On Jan 30, 9:33 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Dont change any wiring . Find the make and model number of the applience , and check for a specification plate on the back for the power requirement.
Post that info here.
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The back of the washing machine says 15A, 240V. (while the one we are replacing says 30A, 240V).
Thanks!
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On Jan 30, 8:55 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The plug shown is a NEMA 14-30R 125/250V 3P, 4W Grounding Plug. What you have described as existing means you are have either a 250V service with no neutral and a ground or you have a 250V service with a neutral and no ground. You need to check your existing outlet and confirm you have Line 1, Line 2, Neutral, and Ground available. If you do it's simply a matter of buying a receptacle that is NEMA 14-30R. If you don't you need to get the proper service to the receptacle first.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Does it say anything about 50 or 60 HZ?
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On 30 Jan 2007 19:33:43 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That is a dryer plug. Is this a washer/dryer combo ?
You can change the cord set to a 3 prong type but be sure you add the bonding jumper back so it bonds the case.
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Did the machine come with a manual? It should tell you how to wire for a three wire cordset to match your receptacle.
If not, try contacting the manufacturer or post the brand and model; someone here might be able to advise you.
As a last resort, you could probably just get a plug to match your receptacle and connect both the ground and neutral to the neutral. It is supposed to be done in the machine, but I can't see why doing it at the plug wouldn't work; though I expect it is a code violation of some sort. Anyone want to tell me why this is more dangerous than bonding in the machine; aside from the difficulty of getting two wires on one terminal in the plug?
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wrote:

No, it won't. This is *very* bad advice. Receptacles (and circuits) should be matched to the cordset, *not* the other way around.

That's somewhat better advice. Too bad you didn't stop there.

Not safely, he can't. Will you PLEASE stop trying to give electrical advice until you've figured out the difference between ground and neutral? They are NOT the same, but you keep posting as if they are.

No it's not.

Oh, it'll work, in the sense that the machine will operate. It just won't be safe, that's all.

Yes, of course it's a Code violation. At least two violations. So why are you advising him to do it?

It's not -- but who said bonding in the machine was safe? And what makes you think that they *are* bonded in the machine?

Because neutral is NOT guaranteed to be at zero potential with respect to true earth ground, and ground IS. Cross-connecting ground and neutral can leave the chassis of the equipment at a non-zero potential with respect to true earth ground -- and that's a potential electrocution hazard.
That hazard is exactly why the Code now requires four-wire circuits for 120/240 devices, and explicitly prohibits doing just what you're advising him to do.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 15:47:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Why not? Dryers are usually listed for 3 wire or 4 wire cordsets. If the manufacturer's instructions allow a 3 wire cordset it is perfectly legal to use one.
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The point was in the part that you snipped: match the receptacle, and the circuit if necessary, to the appliance, not the other way around.
What "dryer", by the way? The OP said he bought a washer...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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That's the really puzzling part, unless it's a combination. For the most part ranges and dryers hadn't been coming with cord sets on them, so we decide which to use depending upon what's on the job, but lately they have been coming with factory installed cord sets, and all I've seen have been four wire, which to me would imply that that's what they want you to use, but I just did a range where the outlet was three wire and the range was four, so I contacted the mfg, who said it was OK to change the cord set, in fact it had a paper bag taped to the under side of the range with a bonding jumper for that purpose
(Doug Miller)

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wrote:

You were doing much better Doug. Did you decided you were cured and stop taking the medication?
Check out page 7. http://www.whirlpool.com/assets/pdfs/product/ZUSECARE/8578899.pdf
I guess Whirlpool doesn't know the difference between a ground and a neutral either.
(I made the assumption that he meant dryer when the OP said washer, since I haven't heard of 240v washers. If my assumption is incorrect then it is not acceptable, since 250.140 does not except 240v washers.)
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No, actually, *you* were doing much better, Wade -- thanks to the repeated spankings you've received in the past for your dangerously bad electrical advice, what you've been giving recently has been much better than it used to be. It's been at least six months since you've written anything that was as flagrantly, egregiously wrong as the nonsense you wrote today.
I was actually beginning to think that perhaps you'd finally learned enough of the difference between ground and neutral to be safe, but I see now that I was wrong.

OK... I did... what's your point?

They can tell the difference just fine, thank you very much -- as you would realize if you had actually bothered to read _and_understand_ the page before posting the link. Their instructions make the difference crystal clear. You're the only one confused here.

I, on the other hand, made the assumption that the OP can tell the difference between a washer and a dryer.
Furthermore, it's doubtful that, even if it *is* a dryer, the exception in 250.140 applies anyway. That article sets out four conditions which must *all* be met for three-wire circuits to be permitted. Number 3 is
"The grounded conductor [that's the NEUTRAL, Wade, not the ground] must be insulated [doubtful], or the grounded conductor is uninsulated and part of a Type SE service entrance cable [even more doubtful] and the branch circuit originates at the service equipment."
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Give it a rest Doug. If he has a 3 wire receptacle, he can put a 3 wire cord on his dryer. Trying to prove you are right when you aren't is just dumb. As a matter of fact, my 3 wire receptacles are wired with SE, as are countless others. Doubtful? Geez.
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wrote:

Sure he can -- with one that's appropriate to the voltage and amperage of the appliance. But you don't have the first clue what the electrical requirements of his appliance are, nor do you know what type of receptacle he actually has.
Not knowing any of that -- and blithely advising him that it's perfectly fine to replace the plug he has with one that fits the receptacle -- is waaaay beyond irresponsible.

Take your own advice there, Wade, and stop trying to defend the incorrect advice you gave the OP.

Yeah, sure they are. Do you even know the difference between SE and NM? Post a photo.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Hell, at this point, we don't even know what kind of appliance it is. Who the hell even ever heard of a 220 washer??? <G>
--
Steve Barker


"Doug Miller" < snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com> wrote in message
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Steve Barker wrote:

Or may well be a combination:
http://tinyurl.com/yo8a8t
And there are 220 volt ones out there:
http://tinyurl.com/yo4lux
It is a 220 4 wire grounded plug.
The machine probably uses 120 for motor. So needs the neutral. Just be certain it is designed for 60 Hz.
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Combo, I can understand. Washer alone 220? That's ridiculous. No call for that.
--
Steve Barker


"Rich256" < snipped-for-privacy@nospam.net> wrote in message
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