What kind of drill bit for bathroom tiles?


Am putting up a shower curtain rail. What type and size(?) of drill/ drill bit should I use? Any other advice welcome.
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Are you drilling into tile, cast iron, wood, etc.?
These things will affect what type of drill you would use.
Lewis.
*****
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They sell special bits for tiles. Try to drill in the grout lines rather than the tiles. If you must drill in the tile, take your time and don't force it.
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Rodman makes carbide tipped tools, one of which is a drill bit that will easily handle tile. Use light steady pressure, or the tile will crack.
Steve
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It also depends on the type of tile. Porcelain tile is much harder and does not like hammerdrill mode. I use the bullet-shaped carbide glass drill bits where there's a critical hole near the edge of a tile. Those bits are not as robust so it pays to take your time and quench the bit so it doesn't overheat.
R
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Actually, if your tiles have small grout lines, DO NOT DRILL in the grout lines, your bit will be hitting the edge of 2 tiles and will either crack the tile or make big chips in the glaze as you drill. The easiest method I have found to drill through a tile is to gently tap an ice-pick with a hammer to chip a little flake off the glaze where you want to start drilling, then use a brand new - never used before - sharp masonry bit in a non-hammer drill. Start slowly and don't increase the RPMs too much and it will cut through the tile.
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EXT wrote:

I use those little carbide spade bits for glass/tile. They come as a set of 4 or 5 bits. I use the smallest one first to drill a pilot hole, then follow with the right sized bit.
You're right about low RPM's.
Bob
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They sell glass and tile drill bits at Lowe's. They look like spear points, but do a great job of drilling into tile. Size depends on how big you need for your screw or anchor.
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On Fri, 19 Sep 2008 10:47:10 -0400, John Grabowski wrote:

Also, use masking tape or blue painter's tape. Tile is slick, and drill bit will want to wander (DAMHIKT)
Your choice, but I also suggest you practice on scrap tile for a couple of holes. Get a feel for how heavy the drill gets when you go slow and you try not to let the drill wobble on the 5th or 6th hole.
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John Grabowski wrote:

I use a small diamond bit to penetrate the tile's glazed surface and then switch to a carbide spade bit.
Keep the bit and tile very cool. Do not force the bit. Lubricate the location being drilled. Water is a sufficient lubricant. Be patient.
Most tile cracks because of thermally induced stress. Whenever possible I drill tile under water (tile in a bucket with an inch of water) and I've never cracked one even when drilling 2" holes.
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Other advice: If your tub is between two parallel walls, use a shower curtain rail that is held in place by spring action and requires no drilling into the walls. An awful lot easier. (Amazon.com product link shortened)dbath&qid21842680&sr=1-11 or (Amazon.com product link shortened)dbath&qid21842680&sr=1-12
--
Peace,
BobJ




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Marilyn & Bob wrote:

fall except when I had just taken it down to work and didn't have it adjusted just right when I put it back up.
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Use a Dremel with a globed diamond tipped bit. Will go through porcelain/ceramic tile very easily with very little chance of breaking the tile. Red
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William wrote:

Unless your surround is tiled all the way to the ceiling, put the shower rod above the tile. Tall users will appreciate it, and shower curtain will stay clean longer, since the bottom dries quicker. Also put the rod as far from the back wall as you can- it makes the usable space in the shower bigger, since the curtain isn't flapping around and sticking to your body. Narrow showers suck.
-- aem sends...
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I had never had one of those curved "motel" rods as they call them. Recently put one in. Really nice in that it gives you a hell of a lot more elbow room and eliminates the flapping around and sticking to your body. About $35 and worth it.
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