What kind of container can I safely mix gas and oil for my snowblower

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Gosh darn it! I purchased and had delivered a new snow blower and we're due to have a storm overnight tonight and into tomorrow. I went to Sears/Kmart looking for a gas can (really plastic) and they did not have any. I had intentions of getting a one gallon can, with gas, and mixing the requisite oil in it for my snowblower.
Soooo.......now that I don't have a gas can I was going to use my hand siphon device to get a half-gallon of gas out of my car and then do the mixing. I gotta find a suitable container for this though. Suggestions?
Would plastic (i.e refrigerated liquid juice container) not work because it might react with the gasoline? All I need to do is mix a half-gallon of gas and an ounce or two of oil.
Thanks, Walter
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Walter Cohen wrote:

Do you have an old antifreeze bottle? How about a motor oil bottle and mix a quart at a time?
Bob
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Walter Cohen wrote:

Do what you would do if you went to the corner 7-11 and they did not have any milk, go to a different store that does have milk.
Not all plastic is good for gasoline. Just keep it legal and safe and use a real gas can.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 20:50:02 -0400, "Walter Cohen"

There are a lot of places that sell gas plastic and metal gas cans. I'm surprised Sears was out of them. In these days with What's it called, Computer based last minute ordering, if 2 or 3 people buy one instead of the expected 1 person per 3 days, they can be out, but in two days they'll probably have them in again.
For auto-parts stores, they might be more careful to never run out. And the odds are high they won't both run out at once.
Gas-stations charge twice as much on parts they install, and maybe even more on gas-cans, which they keep mostly for customers (most of them non-regulars) who have run out of gas and really need one. They used to lend them free, but now they probably want a deposit twice what a can costs.
In the 60's I found out that a Dairy Queen dish dissolved into a puddle of plastic in gasoline. I was cleaning something. It took 10 minutes or more so even though many plastics hold gasoline, I don't know which ones and they may suprise you.
I used to store gas for a camp stove in a Wisk bottle. It was red and only a pint, small enough to take camping, and I wrote gasoline on it in big black letters.
But you're not on the highway without any gas, and you are going to have this snowblower for years. Get a real can.
I wouldn't try siphoning also because this is not an emergency, and inhaled gas is very "poisonous". (I don't know if it literally a poison, but it can kill you.) Go to the gas station and put the cas in your new can, then fill your car's tank and pay for them both together. The auto-stop won't work well with something as small as a gas can, you need to control the trigger yourself. Do this just before you go home, and prop the can so it doesn't spill.

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On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 20:50:02 -0400, "Walter Cohen"

How about going to an auto store, and getting your gas can instead?
tom @ www.Consolidated-Loans.info
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it
To answer your question a plastic juice container will work in a pinch. However, do not store gasoline in the juice jug. Any gas you do not pour into the snow blower, pour it back into your car. When the jug is empty cut it open and let the gas dry out before you toss it.
Chemically the juice jug is the same material an a plastic gas can, but the plastic is a whole lot thinner and as 1 gallon of gasoline vaporized is the equivalent to about 14 sticks of TNT, this is not a risk you want to leave sitting in your garage.
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wrote:

the
It does not matter as long as the bottle is a type of polyethelyne or polypropelyne. Look at the recycling symbol, if it is a 1,2,4, or 5 there is no problem.
See: http://www.earthodyssey.com/symbols.html
I have yet to see any 1/2 gallon juice milk or soda plastic jugs that are not one of the above plastics.
If you put gas in a styrene container it will probably give you problems (Melt)
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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wrote:

The materials may be identical, but the structure is not. Food containers are flimsy compared to plastic fuel containers. Not appropriate.
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wrote:

but
there
are
And therefore lies the reason I admonished the OP with the following:
"To answer your question a plastic juice container will work in a pinch. However, do not store gasoline in the juice jug. Any gas you do not pour into the snow blower, pour it back into your car. When the jug is empty cut it open and let the gas dry out before you toss it."
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 12:00:49 -0700, "Roger Shoaf"

Soda bottles are PET, which I think means either Poly-Ethyl-Tolulene, or polyethylene terephthalate. Except that, given the melting temperatures, the lables are polystyrene, the gaskets are LDPE, and the caps themselves are polypropelyne.
I'm thinking that, in the absence of an appropriate container, the best place to mix gas is in the tank of the target device, or failing that, in a large glass jar.
Better to go buy a proper can, though.
--Goedjn
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I find listerine bottles work great ;) Committees of Correspondence Web page:- tinyurl.com/y7th2c
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intentions
Repost identifying your new snowblower. Gas+oil mixes are required only for 2-stroke gas engines. In this country snowblowers have not for many years used 2-stroke engines -- only 4-stroke engines, where oil is added directly to the sump, not mixed in fuel.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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I used an empty anti-freeze container. My snow blower is a Lawn Boy 2 stroke Insight model 33005. After the storm(!) I went out to a Walmart that had 1,2, and 5 gallon containers.
Thanks to all who posted. Walter

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Walter Cohen wrote:

Mayonnaise jar or coffee can. Anything made of glass or metal. Or ceramic.
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Glass is an extremely bad idea. People win Darwin awards for storing gasoline in glass jars.
Never store gasoline in anything not specifically made for it. People win Darwin awards for doing that also.
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On Fri, 16 Mar 2007 09:11:17 -0700, "Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:>

Once, my upstairs neighbor came to see me looking for help because she had drunk some bleach.
One roommate put bleach in one of those translucent white plastic milk bottles. A second roommate thought it was milk and put it in the refrigerator. And this third roommate thought it was milk, may have poured it in a glass, and drank some.
Related. Strangely, neither of my first-aid manuals listed it among the poisons or anywhere, and the emergency phone number said she had nothing listed, but she checked with a doctor and said it was not a problem. That was 1980. Since then other people have told me it is a problem, and I don't remember the recommended treatment. Maybe it wasn't a problem in this case because she didn't drink much. But there still should have been an entry in the manuals and the operator's manual.
I don't know what they say now.
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http://www.google.com/search?q=msds+bleach
The ones I read say drink a glass of water and call a doctor. I'm surprised it's not a bigger deal than that.
Your story underscores the importance of labelling crap any time you put stuff in another container though.
-- Todd H. http://toddh.net /
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If you can't tell bleach, from milk, then perhaps they got what they deserved.
--
Steve Barker

YOU should be the one
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Yeah. How many hints did they need, other than "clear vs white", and the smell? Don Pardo on a PA system, announcing the contents?
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"tell 'em what they've won Don!" "Well it's a one way trip for one, to hell, for drinking bleach and being a dumass".
--
Steve Barker

YOU should be the one
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