What is this plant called?

Page 1 of 2  
I saw this shrub in the neighborhood. Anyone knows the name and can I buy it at hone depot? Here is a picture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/54230006@N07/8708670467/
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It would make a lot of sense to either contact your cooperative extension, or bring the digicam to HD with you.
Regrettably, I don't recognize the plant. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 4 May 2013 23:42:29 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

There is a website that has an excellent listing of nearly every plant that exists as well a full colored photos and descriptions, locations etc. I dont recall the URL, but just start to search for something like "plant identification".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

From the pic, it's hard to tell the size. And no info is given as to the geographical location. But it looks like a small azalea to me. If so, HD and just about any nursery will have them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2013 1:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I know, I know, "Green bush with pretty red flowers"! I was curious so I found some sites with a lot of pictures and I had no idea that there were so many different varieties of landscape shrubs. I did a search for "Flowering Shrubs Identification, Pictures" and there are a lot of sites on the subject. ^_^
http://tinyurl.com/d8x8tod
http://typesofshrubs.net/
http://tinyurl.com/cer6hzy
http://www.bhg.com/gardening/plant-dictionary/
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 4 May 2013 23:42:29 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

Looks like an azalea to me. They are blooming here right now.
Last place I'd buy plants is Home Depot. You'll get better locally grown at a nursery.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2013 7:50 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Some might like to spend more to get lower quality.
Just stopped at the local nursery yesterday. As an example HD has crappy looking tomato plants for $3.50/each. Her single tomato plants are grown right on site and look really healthy and are $1/each. The four packs are $3. She has at least 30 varieties on hand including many heirloom varieties.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just don't see how HD and Lowes can sell the tomatoes for $ 3 or so each. Several other places around here sell tomatoes in groups of 3 to 4 plants for around that price. As you said, they usually look beter also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Because yuppies buy them and don't care. If you figure out the economics of it, with a lot of the prices you see today, there isn't much upside. Meaning if you factor in that you have to actually grow the vegs, some die due to disease, insects, animals, etc, what you wind up with, you may be better off buying the vegs at the local farm market.
Even at most of the local garden shops here in NJ, the price of veg plants has gone way up. City folks moving in and they see something for $3 and think it's fine because they wan't to be gardeners. And actually, it is OK if you just want a couple of them. But if you're planning on buying a variety of stuff, dozen of them, etc, then I agree, you'd have to be nuts to pay some of these prices.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

there isn't much upside. Meaning if you factor in that you have to actually grow the vegs, some die due to disease, insects, animals, etc, what you wind up with, you may be

It is often cheaper to buy at a farm market. Trick is finding the good vegs. There are two kinds. The ones to sell and the ones to eat. It is often difficult to find a good tomato if you don't grow it yourself. The store bought ones have been engineered to have tough skin so they can be shipped easy. I like a good tomato, but seldom buy one at the stores as they are more like red cardboard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2013 10:18 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

apartment who wants to grow one plant in a pot. OTOH, I just bought 36 tomato plants other day for first veg garden....intentionally a lot of Roma for salsa and cherry tomatoes for gr'sons. Sharing with son and his family. Lots of spinach, chard, pod peas....yumm....
Just bought a growing water lily for the pond, from a pet shop, and apparently a frog hitched a ride. 7 Koi, the largest about 12", survived the first winter in my care, and I survived my first spring of pond cleaning and plumbing. Things are looking good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Decades ago, for a dollar or two I bought via mailorder some tomatoes (seeds, it turned out to be) in 4 2-inch quare plastic "pots", filled with vermiculite. I couldn't even see the seeds but I watered them and got hundreds of seedlings. Donated 15 of them to a community yard sale, and put the rest in the window facing east. Grew to be 6 feet tall, with roots coming out of the holes in the pot (into the corrugated clear plastic meat tray that meat was sold in, that I kept filled with water.)
Cherry tomatoes, so juicy that when I bit into one, it splattered on the wall 6 feet away. And delicious.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 5 May 2013 07:04:09 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Somehow, amongst many people, HD, Lowes, etc have a reputation of having the lowest prices on everything you will ever need. No need to go elsewhere. I know many people that go there as the first and usually the only stop to buy home goods and appliances.
Fact is, local dealers often have better selection, equal or lower prices, better service.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, May 5, 2013 7:49:48 AM UTC-7, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Most people have absolutely NO idea how many more varieties of plants exist . They just assume that places like HD, Armstrong, OSH or Lowes have it all . The truth is it’s just easier to feed the cattle the same hay than to w orry about providing variety.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2013 9:52 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

didn't see an ad by hd telling you how wonderful they are?
A young couple moved in next door last year. We were discussing landscaping. They were all set to go to hd (see above). I mentioned why not try the local garden center. She said they easily bought 4x the plants they could have bought at hd for the same cost and the quality is so much better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2013 9:40 AM, George wrote:

We have visited all of the large and small sellers here of growing plants, and all have had single, larger tomato plants as well as small flats of 3 or 4 plants. Everyone is taking good care of plants so far, but when the weather get hot out on the concrete or blacktop where the keep plants, they will suffer. I got a good deal on frazzled looking hosta last novermber for our new home...they are doing great, and after hacking with a shovel 4 plants have become a dozen :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, May 5, 2013 6:40:32 AM UTC-7, George wrote:

The types of fruit and vegetable plants and seeds that nurseries are allowe d to sell are of the inferior quality. They are not allowed to sell the com mercial quality because of patent restrictions. If you want good quality yo u need to go to the supermarket and plant your own from what you would buy to eat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 5, 11:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

ommercial quality because of patent restrictions. If you want good quality you need to go to the supermarket and plant your own from what you would bu y to eat.- Hide quoted text -

That's about as dumb as dumb gets. Just the opposite is true. There are a huge variety of seeds and plants available. For example, with tomatoes, you can buy everything from heirloom varieties to the latest hybrids. Just look at a seed catalog. At the supermarket, you get commercial varieties that have been bred to ship well, have a long shelf life, with taste being compromised as a result. They are picked before they are ripe, then ripened with ethylene gas. Who would want to grow that instead of any of the varieties from say Burpee?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 5 May 2013 09:17:58 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

to sell are of the inferior quality. They are not allowed to sell the commercial quality because of patent restrictions. If you want good quality you need to go to the supermarket and plant your own from what you would buy to eat.- Hide quoted text -

I agree with you except for this sentence. The poster probably wouldn't pick them early or use ethylene gas, so he'd get a better result than the supermarket.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/5/2013 11:50 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

to sell are of the inferior quality. They are not allowed to sell the commercial quality because of patent restrictions. If you want good quality you need to go to the supermarket and plant your own from what you would buy to eat.

shoot what the result of propagating seeds from vegetables purchased in the supermarket might be. And even if successful you will have a tomato designed for its industrial qualities not taste.
The best tomatoes are the commonly called "heirloom" varieties that typically taste great but lack all of the other qualities desired for industrial tomatoes such as thicker skin, better appearance and more uniform size. You can easily purchase heirloom seeds and plants.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.