What is the logic of banging DOWN on a crankshaft to remove a flywheel?

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On 7/13/2010 1:52 AM, James H. wrote:

NO ONE suggested "banging on the flywheel". You are WRONG WRONG WRONG again.
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Steve Barker
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 09:25:11 -0500, Steve Barker wrote:

I'm sorry. That's a typing mistake made in haste.
I agree. Nobody suggests banging on the delicate flywheel.
MANY people suggested the following: - protect the top of the crankshaft - pry up on the flywheel from below - bang down on the crankshaft
So I tried that, and failed miserably (damaging more than I fixed mainly because this is the FIRST lawnmower I've ever worked on).
Much to my chagrin, belatedly I find out, embossed on the flywheel, are the words "TO REMOVE, USE WHEEL PULLER HOLES" with two big arrows pointing to the untapped wheel puller holes.
Direct link:
http://img708.imageshack.us/g/briggsandstrattonflywhe.jpg/ Short link: http://yfrog.com/jobriggsandstrattonflywhejx
Both the Briggs & Stratton web site and Sears sells the wheel puller that fits those holes (1/4 x 20) as part number BS 19069.
Now I know so much more, thanks to all you guys. I just want the next guy to not bang on the Briggs & Stratton crankshaft when trying to remove their lawnmower flywheel.
Thanks everyone!
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 10:15:34 -0700, "James H."

The next guy who asks how to remove the flywheel on a lawnmower engine will be told to pry up on the flywheel while banging on a double nutted crank end. He will be further advised not to let YOU help in any way.
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I suppose if the OP had used the puller the 1st time and someohow broken the flywheel (it can and does happen with a puller) he would now be maintaining how using a puller is "not correct for my Brigss and Stratton" engine.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 10:15:34 -0700, James H. wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Plktb3a_-MI

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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 17:26:41 +0000 (UTC), Jeff The Drunk wrote:

I think the OPs point is there is a right way and there's the wrong way and that everyone does it the wrong way for his type of B&S engine because it's faster, easier, and cheaper than doing it the right way.
Both ways work.
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 18:09:14 +0000, Brent wrote:

As far as I'm concerned the youtube vid illustrates the right way. First one I removed back in th 70's was under the instruction of a Briggs/Kohler/Tecumseh/Lawnboy authorized repairman. I purchased threaded jigs for different size crank ends designed solely as a aremoval tool to protect the thread end of the crank. I've repaired dozens of bent and sheared crank keys as a hobbyist small engine repairman for profit and as favors for family and friends and not once did it take me more than a rap or two to loosen the flywheel. And I never did any damage. I however don't recommend the average Joe to undertake the job in the first place as evidenced by this James H unfortunate experience.
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 18:37:36 +0000 (UTC), Jeff The Drunk wrote:

TITLE: Flywheel Removal - The Right Way and Several Wrong Ways QUOTE: "The best technique requires a special tool - a flywheel puller; the least preferred method requires nothing more than a hammer and a screwdriver, but can easily result in serious damage to the flywheel and or crankshaft."
TITLE: http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmflyrml.htm QUOTE: "There are several approaches to flywheel removal. The best way by far is to use a special puller designed for your particular engine. Briggs & Stratton and Tecumseh flywheels usually have 2 or 3 holes placed around the center of the flywheel which are used with special puller blocks. These have self tapping bolts which you thread into the holes and then tighten down nuts to pop the flywheel off of the crankshaft."
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 22:35:49 +0000 (UTC), Brent wrote:

I forgot to list the reference for the first quote comparing the methods and concluding the special tool was the preferred method. http://outdoorpowerinfo.com/repairs/flywheel_removal.asp
The second quote came from here. http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmflyrml.htm
Both compared the two methods and concluded the special tool was safer.
Do you know of any reference that compares both method yet still decides the hammer and screwdriver method to be preferred?
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On Jul 13, 5:44pm, Brent <beemdoub...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

It isn't a "perfect" means to remove the fly...it is the preferred method. Yes, you can damage the fly and/or crank...just miss-hit a few times (or one good one)!
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James H. wrote:

http://www.google.com/url?sa=D&q=http://www.managemylife.com/mmh/lis_pdf/OWNM/L0505023.pdf&usg QjCNH2N8YjjLyskja0QyfRWxQAo5_C_A
There must be 100 special tools that are "required" to work on things I've worked on. I've done just fine without once buying them, thank you. Just because a manufacturer sells a tool for a job does not make that the "right way". And just because you say it does not make it so either. If it does the job without damage and is quick and cheap - it's the right way. Especially if it avoids having to order and pay, and wiat for a special tool.
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I have used both methods...I know there are times when a puller (the proper one) will NOT work without the accompanied blow of the hammer. This is due to the tapered shaft and the die-cast materiel of the fly- wheel that tend to bond together. The loosen, wedge, whack...is the preferred method by most small engine mechanics that I have seen or known. bob_v
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 09:52:34 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa wrote:

Thanks Steve Barker, Bob F, and Bob Vila for the information.
As can be seen from the pictures published, the videos, the PDFs, and the tools sold, there are two main ways to remove the flywheel from a Briggs and Sratton lawnmower.
For the expert (you guys), the bang-on-the-crankshaft method must surely work; but for me, admittedly a novice at working on lawnmower engines, the documented method to use a flywheel puller is the way to go.
As can be seen from the posted pictures, they pry-and-bang method only netted me a broken intake manifold and the need to extract a broken screw; whereas the tap-and-pull flywheel puller method easily removed the flywheel sans damage.
Let's all agree there are two ways, and the "proper" way is documented right on the flywheel in raised letters (which requires tapping the holes); but let's also agree that most of you are successful with judicious use of the pry-and-bang method which I personally do not recommend for anyone who has not worked on a lawnmower before.
Thanks all for your help. I'm waiting for the parts to arrive so I can replace the blade, the manifold, the gasket, and the flywheel key.
Thanks!!!!!!!! Jim
Pictures of the flywheel lettering: http://yfrog.com/jobriggsandstrattonflywhej
http://img708.imageshack.us/img708/7369/briggsandstrattonflywhe.jpg
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 10:23:45 -0700, "James H."

I sure hope you ordered a new flywheel. That one is now dangerous to use. Seriously. Someone could be killed.
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Oh for God's sake! Why not just recommend he buy a whole new mower already!
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 21:14:01 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Oh, for god's sake yourself, wasserman. He posted that in one of his attempts he SAW the flywheel flex upward when he applied force incorrectly. That is more than enough reason to replace it.
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On Jul 13, 5:14pm, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

LOL!
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 21:14:01 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

I hinted about a new mower upstream. I cautioned the OP about replacing a (potentially) bent crankshaft. I explained the task may require use of a pry and hammer.
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On 7/13/2010 4:14 PM, Larry W wrote:

probably DOES need a new mower. Especially using the methods he's used.
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Steve Barker
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Larry W wrote:

That's what you do when the blade gets dull.
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