What is the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 class 10 micro SDHC memory cards

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On Wed, 13 Aug 2014 13:44:06 +0100, nemo wrote:

I can read it as 5.3 volts printed right on my charger! So the only mistake is in the Amazon photos.
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On Wed, 13 Aug 2014 07:33:17 +0100, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

I charges when plugged into a thin micro USB 2.0 port but if I use the phone, it goes down in battery even while plugged in.
So I think it needs the bigger fatter USB blue port.
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On Wed, 13 Aug 2014 13:44:06 +0100, nemo wrote:

Samsung themselves, say it's 5.3 volts. http://www.samsung.com/za/consumer/mobile-phone/mobile-phone/mobile-phone-accessories/EP-TA10EWEQGWW-spec http://www.samsung.com/za/business/business-products/mobile-devices/mobile-accessories/EP-TA10EWEQGWW
Plus I can read 5.3 volts printed on the charger.
Also Amazon shows it at 5.3 volts: (Amazon.com product link shortened) As does Wireless Ground: http://www.wirelessground.com/samsung-galaxy-note-3-travel-charger-2-amp.html
Whatever XDA is, they show it at 5.3 volts also: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t $79107 http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t%34079
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On Wednesday, August 13, 2014 9:24:42 AM UTC-4, Elechi Amadi wrote:

As others have said, it's not compliant with the USB charging spec, but it's also only higher by a very slight amount, which should not matter. The USB spec is for 4.75 to 5.25. Samsung is at 5.3. That could just be someone writing the spec, rounding up and maybe the device itself is compliant if you measured it.
In any case, any USB 2.0 charger will work.
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["Followup-To:" header set to comp.mobile.android.]

The USB data sockets on computers and USB Hubs often can't provide more than 500 mA (0.5 A). That's why some gadgets, eg USB disc drives, sometimes have a cable with two USB plugs - to get twice the power.
The 'next' USB standard, USB 3, will allow for more power to be delivered. Meanwhile, smartphones and tablets are usually provided with mains power adaptors which can provide more than 2 Amps, but with USB 2 style sockets so that the same USB cable can be used for charging (from a mains power adaptor or car adaptor) and for data connections with computers (which are very unlikely to have USB 3 sockets yet, as the basic specification has only just been fixed). It's possible that some computers or USB hubs may be able to provide 1 Amp or more from their USB 2 sockets, if a device is plugged in that can use it.
The difference between "5.3 volts" and "5 volts" in the markings and description of the mains chargers being argued about here, is probably down to differing national regulations rather than to any actual difference in the chargers themselves. USB chargers, and the power wire in a computer's USB socket, is required to have its output "between 4.75 volts and 5.25 volts" according to the international standard; the nominal voltage is 5. But I can imagine that some countries might require that the device be marked with the maximum voltage it can produce - and if the same country's laws round all voltage limits to one decimal place, you end up with a marking of "5.3 volts" for a device that does in fact produce no more than 5.25 volts (if you can find a volt meter accurate enough to tell the difference).
If you want to have a smartphone in the car being charged up even while it's in use (for navigation or music or whatever) then make sure the car USB charge adaptor can manage 2 Amps (some can't).
If you get a branded item from the same shop as you got the handset from, or a reputable dealer of that brand, there shouldn't be any problems. Going for a cheap alternative, especially a 'fake', may well end in tears.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
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On Thursday, August 14, 2014 8:19:42 PM UTC-4, Whiskers wrote:

A few of us were on the rounding off idea, but you've come up with a possible good reason for having to do it. IDK if it's ture or not, but it certainly sounds like a reasonable possibility.

Only disagree with the last part. I've bought a few chargers off of Ebay, for <$5 and have had no problems. If you buy it from the "dealer", eg at the phone carrier store, it's typically $25+, which seems a bit steep for a 5v charger.
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On Wed, 13 Aug 2014 08:24:42 -0500, Elechi Amadi
wrote:

same

product

e-accessories/EP-TA10EWEQGWW-spec

le-accessories/EP-TA10EWEQGWW

.html

Quit gassing. Measure it. Both unloaded and at 1.00 Amperes.
?-)
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On Thu, 14 Aug 2014 08:04:10 +0100, Andy Burns


Hmm. Hadn't heard of rechargeable electronic cigarettes. The ones i have seen use expendable batteries in the nicotine cartriages. Live and learn.
?-)
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