What is the best rubberized /polymer based roofing cement on the market?

Anyone have any experiences regarding this issue? I need to make a permanent repair of a crack that has formed at he base of an exterior foundation wall. I was planning to parge it with portland cement and then covering it with a couple layers of the roofing cement.. I noticed that alot of the roofing products have asbestos mixed in the product. Does this pose any risk? Thanks
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Jimmy

Nehmo Probably not. But which product are you referring to?
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 07:17:24 GMT, "Nehmo Sergheyev"

I was looking at the roofing products Home Depot carries. I believe they carry products from Henry. All of there roofing cements contain chrysotile, which is a form of asbestos.
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Jimmy

Nehmo
Jimmy
Nehmo This goes deeper into the hazards than you may have wanted http://www.inchem.org/documents/ehc/ehc/ehc203.htm After you read it, summarize it and post your conclusions ;--)
Anyway, I wouldn't worry about a bucket of plastic roof cement; I don't see how you could inhale the fibers. I, personally, always have some on hand. I also keep some fiberglass webbing, a coil of aluminum, a couple of triangle trowels, and a propane torch for cleaning them. I don't repair roofs frequently, but I used to, and I like to be always ready.
Regarding which type to get: Get the so-called "dry" kind - not the kind you can apply to wet surfaces. Don't get the thin stuff (sometimes called lapping compound) either. And I don't think it matters which brand you use.
Mineral data (chrysotile has several names) http://www.mindat.org/min-975.html
Serpentine (another name for chrysotile) "Used like marble for decorative purposes." http://www.bartleby.com/65/se/serpenti.html
One unadvertised use of plastic roof cement (and it this case you could use lapping compound) is to get back at people. Plastic roof cement would be the stuff alright.
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Nehmo

Jimmy
Nehmo The "wet" kind is a mess to apply and takes forever to setup. It, believe it or not, works on wet surfaces though. So if you have to repair a roof while you're in the eye of a hurricane, then use the wet stuff. In all other circumstances, use the regular, (so-called) dry type.
Jimmy

Nehmo I don't know of any longevity comparison, but I see no reason to suppose the wet is more durable.
To do a good job, trowel a thin first layer. Then cover it with fiberglass webbing. Then trowel another coat on top of the webbing.
If your application is a visible foundation wall, you should paint over your job for appearances and for protection form the sun. But if you do it too soon, cracks will form in your paint. Wait a few days first.
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Jimmy, Roofing cement is manufactured for bonding and sealing roofing materials and its just not a good idea to install them on masonry. There are concrete bonding and sealing materials on the market designed for this purpose, and the better ones will work just fine. One that bonds and seals and turns hard will be your best bet here. Terry Lewis Contracting>Subject: What is the best rubberized /polymer based roofing cement on the

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On 10 Aug 2003 07:51:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (lewisconva) wrote:

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On 10 Aug 2003 07:51:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (lewisconva) wrote:

I don't understand this. All the foundation guys I talk to in my neck of the woods always use some type of roofing cement to patch tie holes and seal pipe penetrations. Although they use the cheaspest shit they can find it is still a roofing product. Why would you recommend something that sets up hard when the wall will tend to expand and contract depending on weather conditions. That's why I'm looking for a rubberized product that will give with foundation movement.
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regular movement, then you have a problem in your footing. Pipe penetrations, yes because the pipe will move, and a non bonding sealer is needed to seal out moisture, but for cracking we use bonding and sealing concrete bonding agents, and yes they get hard, and we want them to because it adds strength to the wall and helps to keep if from moving, just like motor or concrete would, its basically the same, except it has a higher bonding strength than concrete. The guys in your area are looking for a quick buck here, by using a roofing cement on a crack, roofing cement is a lot cheaper that a concrete bonding agents. I live by one rule, if I do a job, then it will be done right. You may want to have someone look at you foundation here. Terry Lewis Contracting

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