What is a good temporary coating for extension cord joints

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So it's nothing that is sold for the kitchen. So what are you talking about? What is the brand name? Where is it sold?
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He's talking about plastic wrap that is used by the shipping industry to wrap pallets and skids and boxes with. The average Joe can get wrap like that at Staples and the like, even larger Post Offices or moving places that selling shipping supplies. But it's sold in like 1000 foot quantities. If you work for a company that has a shipping deptment you can get it there if you ask your co-worker.
The stuff I use is kitchen food wrap that clings to one side of the plastic. However I'm in Cold Canada where the cold weather can make any plastic wrap or film unclingy so I use really good quality electrical tape to ensure the wrap stays in place in case kids or dogs trip on my cords, etc. Usually winter around my house the snow and ice will stay on the ground for 20- 30 days at a time, melt, then come back and stay another 30 days. There was one winter where it stayed for 104 days straight. I'd had no fears about water seeping in thru kitchen wrap plastic.
I don't use the tape around the plugs cause the adhesive messes things up and sticks to stuff. It's like mucky glue.
Because I work in a warehouse for a living I can get DerbyDad's wrap for free and I might try it next year.
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I used the stretch wrap this year for my Christmas lights and we went through all sorts of weather from snow to thaw to rain and none of the connections had an issue. I had one connection where a 3-way adaptor was plugged into the end of an extension cord but only 2 of the receptables was being used. This connection was lying on top of the bushes and got covered in snow a couple of times and also rained upon.
I think I would have known if there was an issue since my GFCI has tripped in the past due to unprotected extension cord junctions.
For Halloween I used an extension cord that has a junction box and a duplex receptacle on the end. I stretch-wrapped the whole mess and it sat in the rain for days and never tripped the GFCI.
re: "I don't use the tape around the plugs cause the adhesive messes things up and sticks to stuff. It's like mucky glue."
That's what makes the stretch wrap so convenient. It only sticks to itself and once stretched it seals very, very well.
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re: But it's sold in like 1000 foot quantities
Yeah, but for only $7.99!
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?category=&q=stretch+wrap
I spent less than that on my roll and it has lasted a long time although now that I'm finding more and more uses for it, I'll need to get new one.
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On Jan 9, 6:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I would make up cables with waterproof connectors. Make the cables long enough so the only splice is at the tank where the heaters plug into the cords. Consider installing a permanent outlet at the tanks feed by a buried cable. Place the connections in a weather tight box.
Jimmie
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On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 04:02:29 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Get some double gang code keepers, seal up backside or attach them to double gang aluminum box. Mount them on a stake next to water tank, place heater plug and extension cord socket inside code keeper.
http://www.homedepot.com/Electrical-Electrical-Boxes-Conduit-Fittings-Covers/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xg1Zbohm/R-100181101/h_d2/ProductDisplay
http://www.lowes.com/pd_147292-53911-2CKNM-NG-L_4294821893_4294937087_?productId257028
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Or go full blown and build your own specialised extension cord (50 to 100ft) with 4 conductors(2 circuits) cable with two sets of outlets inside a aluminum double gang box w code keeper and other end with switches inside another double box w code keeper.
Make each outlet switchable from remote location. Plug in different size heaters (250, 500, 1000) into their own switchable outlet under the code keeper.
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or go super simple..
Use a foot long section of 1&1/2" grey PVC.. slip it over extension cord and heater plug... Stuff some form in either end.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote the following:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

    I have used an old bicycle inner tube cut to a length that will cover the ends of the cords and tied with Panduit ties. If you are really in need of a waterproof cover, you can place a rubber caulk over both ends before tying the ends with Panduit ties.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Is it possible to replace the line cord on the tank heater with one that is long enough to reach the outlet in the nearby shed?
Jon
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On 1/9/2011 5:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Don't know if the big-boxes carry it, but any real contractor supply house will have purpose-built gasketed plastic boxes for this purpose. Looks sorta like a hot dog bun- put the cords in, and snap shut. Even has strain reliefs to tuck the cords into, so you don't have to tie a knot in the connection, which is usually why the ends come off cords.
(Googles) Here's one, at random: http://www.littlegreenhouse.com/accessory/electrical.shtml#cover
But having said that, can't you just set the connection up on an old milk crate or something? As long as I kept it out of standing water, I've never had any problems.
--
aem sends...

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On 1/9/2011 5:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

You can buy booted cord connectors and caps that are intended specifically for what you are doing.
Also if you need to use tape for something else in cold weather just buy real tape. The typical tape you find at the big box mart is made from cheap plastic and gets hard in cold weather and also with time.
Real electrical tape:
http://www.3m.com/product/information/Scotch-Super-33plus-Vinyl-Electrical-Tape.html
http://www.3m.com/product/information/Scotch-Super-Vinyl-Electrical-Tape-88.html

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On 1/9/2011 4:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Out side of the sealed plug topic, I came across an interesting site about deicers:
http://www.farminnovators.com /
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote: ...

...
Indeed; I can't imagine having such a makeshift operation to start with; there's too much else to do to have to take the time not to mention the inconvenience of dealing with it in inclement weather and the conditions otherwise.
While were not large operation by today, feedlots have capacity here for about 500 head in the main feeding lots and the working and holding pens total five watering stations. They're all permanently plumbed/wired and the heaters are thermostatically controlled instead of fixed wattage so takes that away. Can't imagine dealing with anything else.
To get thru the immediate winter I'd follow w/ the recommendation of picking the junctions up off the ground somebody else made on a temporary post and switching to thermostatically-controlled heaters aka the above link or something similar; there are many choices as well as these (should be a stock item at the local farmers co-op or farm supply of choice).
--
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On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 04:02:29 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Silicone caulk. It's a bugger to get off later - or silicone grease - (silicone dialectric compund or waterproof silicone-based lubricating grease)
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On 1/9/2011 4:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

tie 'em up off the ground on a stake or something and cover with a zip lock bag. personally, i won't use a gfci ANYwhere for that matter, but if you insist....
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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Steve Barker wrote:

But the current code requires GFCI in wet locations. There used to be some exceptions but I think they're largely gone. The GFCI does serve a purpose for livestock. Critters are really sensitive to current leakage. There have been a lot of stories over the years of dairy cattle not producing due to current leakage. Other animals might not drink if there is current leakage around around water tanks. They'll actually get a small shock while you and I wouldn't feel a thing. The code for livestock buildings is more stringent also now.
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On 1/9/2011 9:02 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

code schmode, when on a farm you do what works. and gfci's don't work outside. BTDT, many times.
--
Steve Barker
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re: "...and gfci's don't work outside"
Actually, they work very well outside, if used for their intended purpose.
Based on what you said, these must be for inside use only:
http://www.the-power-washer-advisor.com/images/ExtCords_GFCI.jpg
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re: "...and gfci's don't work outside"
Actually, they work very well outside, if used for their intended purpose.
Based on what you said, these must be for inside use only:
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There are outdoor rated (CSA and UL) GFCI's and there are properly rated covers for them too.
You can also use GFCI breakers at the panel box for such a purpose however these are costly. For example I have a 220 volt/7.5 amp swimming pool plug that I could not find a properly rated outdoor gfci outlet for. When I changed my panel box this summer, the Electrician said they are not available in Ontario and I had to pay $145 for the breaker (2 pole).
OUCH!
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We've heard some of your other ideas so we'll give that one the credit it deserves.
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On Jan 9, 5:02 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

For both my Halloween and Christmas decorations I wrap my cord connections in stretch wrap like this product:
http://www.movingboxdallas.com/images/stretchwrap.jpg
I use in it all sorts of ways to secure items, seal items, waterproof items, etc.
Many things that I used to use duct tape for now get wrapped with stretch wrap. It's cheaper and much easier/cleaner to remove.
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