What happens if you put 75 watt bulb in a 60 watt fixture

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On 1/26/2013 5:18 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

But in what may be a miracle, I think everyone agreed on this one.
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On Sat, 26 Jan 2013 17:31:51 -0600, bud-- wrote:

Even me!
The 75Watt Par 30 bulb was just too hot for the lamps.
So I replaced all the bulbs with SMALL CFL bulbs.

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On Sun, 27 Jan 2013 03:31:00 +0000 (UTC), Joe Mastroianni

That may not be such a good idea. CFLs can easily overheat in fixtures that weren't intended for them.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz writes:

Hmm, didn't the OP just report how cool the fixture was? Seems like...
> I followed your advice and found shorter CFL bulbs. >
> > They have about half the light but they don't stick out anymore. > And, those Halogen 75 Watt Par30 bulbs were blazing hot! > > The CFL is almost cool to the touch so it's a good solution > that fits the problem set without too many compromises.
Why yes he did!
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

Don't believe it.
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I had CFL's in an outdoor enclosed dome, in the sun, on continuously, until their expected lifetime expired. I suspect temperature was really high at times. I ran two CFL's that way until finally went to dark on relay.
Greg
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On Sat, 26 Jan 2013 23:18:35 +0000, Doug Miller wrote:

I think you missed the post from this morning (9:03am) showing that I followed the overwhelming advice o the group and bought a SMALL set of CFLs to install into the lamps.
Here's what I had written:

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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 22:37:44 +0000 (UTC), Joe Mastroianni

And you know what ASS U ME does - - -

What happens depends on the construction of the lamp.
The brass socket style have craft paper type insulator between the brass shell and the internal socket. Overheat and it burns. Usually no fire - but now there is no electrical insulation - and the brass, having been overheated, looses it's temper - gets soft - and now the pressed together shell gets loose, and it is easily knocked apert - so the shell now shorts to the exposed terminal on the socket - and the lamp becomes "live"

If it is an open lamp, that's generally the extent of the damage - untill someone touches it and gets a (possibly serious) shock.
If the lamp is an enclosed fixture, snug to the ceiling or wall, the insulation in the fixture breakes down - the insulation in the socket - if brass- deteriorates as above, with the same result - except it can short to ground - possibly blowing the fuse - possibly establishing an arc which can ignite anything flamable - including, possibly, the wire insulation in the box.
The high heat can also melt or warp plastic shades and difusers - and depending on the design, the plastic can contact the hot bulb - causing either fire or toxic smoke.
In a best case scenario, the overheated socket simply looses contact pressure on the center contact, causing the lamp to flicker or not work. The high resistance connection - if left powered on for too long, can severely overheat and, again, POSSIBLY cause a fire or damage to house wiring in the box.
At the very least - the socket/fixture itself is damaged and requires replacement.
Replacing with a ceramic (not plastic) socket can REDUCE some of the problems, again depending on the fixture design.
GENERALLY ceramic sockets are rated higher than brass (or steel) and ALWAYS higher than plastic (which should really be outlawed).

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Nothing specific about about the lamp itself, but
http://thenewsherald.com/articles/2013/01/26/news/doc5102dd038de0e262649155.txt
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Interesting -- sounds like the fixture might have been an old halogen torchiere which indeed is a fire hazard for lots of reasons including the high possibility of curtains/drapes blowing onto the hot surface of the bulb. A few years ago, (1992-97) articles reported that halogen torchiers were favorites of college dorm students as they could cook on them using the dimmer to control the heat. Some of those torchieres used 500 watt bulbs and then, later on, 350 watt bulbs.
But, what triggered the demise of halogen torchieres was the fire that destroyed the home of Lionel Hampton. When the cause of that fire was traced to a torchiere, people got excited, the CPSC got involved, UL tests were changed to require a wire or glass guard around the bulb. Then, as energy laws were passed in various places, torchieres had to become more efficient and did so by a redesign using CFL bulbs. Some manufacturers also redesigned torchieres into floor lamps. Here's the story:
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Torchiere+safety+push.-a019090478 and
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1997-09-17/business/9709170061_1_halogen-lamps-torchiere
Tomsic
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http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1997-09-17/business/9709170061_1_halogen-lamps-torchiere
I converted a 500 watt sky lamp to CFL many years ago. It was very good. Nice color temp, but of course not as bright as 500 watt. Even used same dimmer. Bulb bought at The Home Depot many years ago, as a dim able CFL. It was $ 15-20 back then, and apparently a quality lamp.
Greg
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That's good to hear after so much discussion about the short life of CFLs on this NG. I've also had some CFLs, including a nice 3-way, that have been working just fine for 9+ years now. I think buying Energy Star CFLs does make a difference in the quality of the product.
Tomsic
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I take that to mean you have no examples of an insurance company denying a claim because someone put in a bulb that was too large and you were just spreading FUD.
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writes:

I take that to mean you have no examples of an insurance company denying a claim because someone put in a bulb that was too large and you were just spreading FUD.
Well, I posted where I thought I read it. Why don't you look it up? At the very least you'll learn something about the hazards of old wiring in homes and there are some nifty pictures too. But remember that UL is a non-government organization started by insurance companies ("underwriters"), so the UL sticker is an indication of what they think is safe according to their own standards. In an argument - or court case -between a home owner and an insurance company about any electrical product that electrocuted someone or started a fire, who do you think would have the best chances of winning if the product didn't have a UL sticker?
Tomsic
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wrote:

What will NOT happen is the manufacturer of the lamp being found responsible for the fire due to a faulty product. Use the product other than as directed and there is no warranty - and no liability on the part of the manufacturer / seller.
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On Friday, January 25, 2013 10:15:46 AM UTC-5, Art Harris wrote:

+1
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On 11/11/2013 10:45 AM, Thomas wrote:

Depends. Obviously, it is going to be hotter with the larger bulb. I've done it in fixtures that are on for only a few minutes at a time. No way would I do it in a ceiling fixture that may be on for hours at a time and overheat.
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email.me:

use

Whats the price of a burned down house? Those limit rules are there for a reason, you know......
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On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 05:56:39 +0000 (UTC), Joe Mastroianni

I put 100 watt bubls in my kitchen ceiling fixture with 3 globes keeping the heat in, and over a couple three or 10 years, the plastic around the metal sockets got brittle and fell off in chunks. One socket stopped working too, bad wire connection at the metal socket.
I also used a 100 watt bulb in a desk lamp with a cone shaped metal shade, and iover a couple years it damaged the socket, but in this case the built-in switch. The kind of socket that is colinear with the rotating knob that is the switch, (like is used in over the bed headboard lamps with the long salami shaped bulbs) I have to grab the round thing hard and trun hard, to go from on to off and offf to on. The next two notches, which are the same thing are easy, but that makes a full revolution, and the next 2 are very hard again.
No fires. And this is 100 for a 60, not 75 for one (the ceiling fixture. The desk lamp may have been designed for 75)
BTW, the lamp is probably 50 yeaers old and will last another hundred after I replace the socket/switch. During the really hot weather I had to start using CFL in it or it was too hot to get close too, but the switch was damaged already.
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wrote:

You are blessed with luck and good fortune; but I hope your insurance agent reads your post and figures out who you are because I don't want you in my risk group. And, test your smoke detectors regularly.
Tomsic
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