What happens if you ever lose a "chipped" key for your car?

Page 2 of 4  
wrote:

Bobby, you're better off getting one of those plastic wallet keys from AAA that just opens the door. Then you can look inside for where you hid your chipped key.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
news:1a3370b6-c31e-477b-8596-
<<Bobby, you're better off getting one of those plastic wallet keys from AAA that just opens the door. Then you can look inside for where you hid your chipped key.>>
I have an old "wallet card key" that's got a small head and snaps into a credit card sized holder that keeps it in one place in the wallet I got for the '90 Honda in 1990. The TruValue guy said they didn't make them anymore (translation - he didn't sell them!). I am glad to hear that AAA might have them. Thanks for the heads up - the metal key I had TruValue make is still huge (quarter-sized head for some reason) and doesn't work. A plastic wallet key will make the security guards I deal with a lot happier, too.
The great key science project continues. I read today that if I want to install a remote starter, which I was thinking about when last year's ice storms hit, the transponder mechanism must be defeated. I also read that they have become ubiquitous because they really do prevent car thefts. The Dodge unit lets the engine rev for 2 seconds and then cuts out, and when my neighbor heard the engine rev /stop / rev / stop she knew something was wrong. They wasted enough time starting it that they forgot to even steal the money in the "tollbooth" tray. Up until that night I mistakenly assumed the car had an alarm that sounded when the car was broken into. Now it does. (-:
The tow truck driver kept trying to start it with a screwdriver in the ripped open lock, too, with no success. It was started so many times that night I'm sure the longevity of the starter gear train and motor has been compromised. I hate car thieves. Every county should have a "bait car" program to round 'em up and send them to boot camp in Nevada or Utah. The problem I hear is that if you leave a Lexus running empty with the keys in it in all but the richest neighborhoods, it's gone. I've seen them interview people who up until they saw it, never had a major crime on their rap sheet. Too much temptation for some nitwits, I suppose. I do get a guilty pleasure watching car thieves realize they're stealing a bait car and are about to be arrested, trying to exit the now remotely locked car.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
. Does anyone know if a key can be erased and reprogrammed? I

You must have two valid "working" keys that will start the vehicle and keep it running, in order to be able to use the "Customer Learn Method" to make more valid keys.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

break-in.
to
when
and
key
to
keep
make
If both the dealer key and the TruValue clone operate the car independently of each other, I assume I have what I need. I see Ebay selling the blanks cheap - $10 to $20. Since I'm damn cheap I can't bring myself to pay $75 for a third key from TruValue since with cutting, it won't cost me more the $20. A great adventure begins. I hope TruValue doesn't tell me "we don't cut customer provided blanks."
I guess I can take the third key, which worked with the old "immobiliser" and try to see if I can overwrite the code that's already in there using the "Customer Learn Method." I don't see how it could hurt anything . . . Well, I do see how it could hurt something if the other two keys stop working for some reason. I am off to review my car manual but I don't recall anything about programming my own keys.
Thanks again. Once again, AHR broadens my knowledgebase.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

Hi, You can buy a blank key with virgin chip. Having it cut is easy but programming is done by a dealer. I don't know locksmith have something to program it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

Some locksmiths are equipped to program chip keys. On some vehicles you are able to program new chip keys yourself as long as you have two working chip keys to use in the process. It's a *really* good idea to get extra keys when you get the vehicle and put a couple away somewhere safe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But don't you need at least one active key to program it from?
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just a guess:
Hook the programmer up to the car's computer and download the code required to program the key.
If the original key was required, then I doubt *anyone*, including the dealer, would be able to duplicate the key.
Here's a related, and somewhat humorous, story.
I coach Girl's Softball. The team met in the high school parking lot and we all boarded the bus. A few minutes down the road our short stop's cell phone rang. Turns out Mom has one of those push-button- start cars where all you have to do is have the key nearby, like in a pocket, to start it. It also turns out that Mom had let the daughter drive the car to the school with Mom in the passenger seat. Guess who still had the keys in their pocket? The girl on the bus!
Mom was worried that the car was going to stall on the way home and wanted us to come back. Even though it was still running, she assumed that it wouldn't stay running without the key nearby. We weren't about to turn around, so she took a chance and drove home (about a mile). She made it home, moved her husband's car out of the driveway so she didn't block it in and then shut her car down, leaving it sit until late that night when we got back from our game.
I guess they'll stay running even if the key is moved away from the vehicle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/25/2011 4:22 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Why not? You always have to design in a method just for such events. I have only seen it done once and the dealer had to contact the manufacturer for some sort of hash that they entered via their diagnostic unit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I kept the number that was on the keys when I got it. Non-chipped, I just read the numbers to the dealer and they made a new key. I wonder if the numbers are all I need with a chipped key.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/25/2011 6:13 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

No, but the dealer can make "non chipped" keys without you furnishing the number (assuming no one has changed the cylinders to a different keying)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

When the car's steering wheel lock was popped, the dealer ended up having to give me a new chip - the old keys opened the door but wouldn't start the car.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Just a guess:
Hook the programmer up to the car's computer and download the code required to program the key.
If the original key was required, then I doubt *anyone*, including the dealer, would be able to duplicate the key.
Here's a related, and somewhat humorous, story.
I coach Girl's Softball. The team met in the high school parking lot and we all boarded the bus. A few minutes down the road our short stop's cell phone rang. Turns out Mom has one of those push-button- start cars where all you have to do is have the key nearby, like in a pocket, to start it. It also turns out that Mom had let the daughter drive the car to the school with Mom in the passenger seat. Guess who still had the keys in their pocket? The girl on the bus!
Mom was worried that the car was going to stall on the way home and wanted us to come back. Even though it was still running, she assumed that it wouldn't stay running without the key nearby. We weren't about to turn around, so she took a chance and drove home (about a mile). She made it home, moved her husband's car out of the driveway so she didn't block it in and then shut her car down, leaving it sit until late that night when we got back from our game.
I guess they'll stay running even if the key is moved away from the vehicle. ============================================== That's an interesting test. I think I am going to hide the spare key somewhere in the vehicle - just where might have to be decided by testing. Might have to put it a metal box like a magnetic key holder. Thanks for the information!
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kurt Ullman wrote:

Depends on the vehicle I would think. If you or the locksmith have the "real" factory scan/diag unit you can normally program new keys without any current keys.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just wanted to add, on many vehicles, the _key_ is not programmable. rather, the scan tool or key replacment procedure programs the vehicle ECM (computer) to recognize the key. What's more, certain make/models have ECM with a limit on the number of keys they will recognize, and no way to "free" a key code no longer used; IOW, once you've programmed the vehicle for new keys 10 times (typically, might be more/less) that particular vehicle will not be able to have any more new keys added without a new ECM too. Good luck with that.
--
There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

recognize,
more/less)
If I manage to lose nine keys or have nine more teenage kids try to steal it, I'll just give up on driving. I'll have to look up the bill. I believe my insurance company and I were charged about $400 for a new immobilizer. Had a $500 deductible - total bill for kids popping the door and then the steering column lock was over $1,000.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry W wrote:

On some Fords at least you get something like 8 active keys max by default, but the dealer or someone else with the VCM/IDS laptop can set the PCM to unlimited mode which is intended for fleet use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

That makes sense. I also realized that if you had your key off to a valet parker for more than an hour or two that THEY could easily clone the key, toss the car looking for an address and pick up your car a few weeks later, easy as pie.
Yesterday, my dentist gave my wife's phone number to some guy who alleged she banged into her car in the parking lot and didn't leave a note. They didn't step outside to look at the "alleged" damage, they didn't say "call the cops and we'll give it to them, not you" or even "We'll call her and ask her to call you." She's fuming mad and so am I. You'd think that even a phone number would be privileged information under the Federal medical privacy laws.
My wife, who's been going to the same dentist for 25 years is more steamed that the dentist/staff would believe she's a "hit and run" artist. I'm tempted to call my lawyer buddy and ask if they can give out a patient's phone number to anyone, even someone they know (we haven't established who this person is or if someone on the staff knew them).
Most peculiar and really upsetting to my wife who thinks that the dental office should now pay to have her phone number changed (we still keep a landline each). This is a publicly listed land line, too, so now this cretin has our address. Time to clean and oil the Glock.
On other front in the war on privacy, I bought a pair of shoes yesterday at Payless and the clerk asked for my phone number, to which I just said "No" so he just took my cash and rang me up. At the bottom of the receipt its says: "Good news, Payless has settled the text messaging class action lawsuit. If you received a text message from us . . . you may be eligible for a $25 credit."
What's going ON with this world? The right to privacy is slowly but surely being erased.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unlike docs not all dentists are automatically covered under HIPAA. Mostly has to do with whether they submit claims via computers and even that isn't total. A phone # would be covered *IF* the jawbreaker is covered.

--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I said they were not AUTOMATICALLY covered. They may be depending on how and who they bill and myriad other things. Might be worth your while to find out for sure.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.