What happens if you ever lose a "chipped" key for your car?

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A question for the locksmiths here:
Would a locksmith be able to get me started if I somehow lost the RF chipped key that starts my car? This is a 2002 Chrysler minivan with a device in the steering column called an "immobilser" (and spelled that way, too) that will turn the starter but not engage the engine unless the chipped key is near the steering column. Do they have the tools to re-create that kind of key on-site or what? I know locksmiths can duplicate the key, but they have the original to start with.
I want to figure out if it's worth buying and hiding a spare key for inside the van somewhere (far enough away not to activate the immobilizer).
TIA,
-- Bobby G.
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If misplacing things is a problem, going without that car for a while until the key can be replaced would be an issue, and your travel patterns would make your retrieval problematic, getting a spare makes sense. It's insurance, right? Peace of mind.
http://www.brandtlocksmiths.com/doc/DOcAC.htm
R
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Robert Green wrote:

Before you go to the dealership for the spare key, try the BORG. On my last trip to HD, they had a selection of chipped key replacements in the $40-$60 range.
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On Tue, 25 Oct 2011 21:49:36 -0400, "Robert Green"

I got one at a Ford dealer for $30 and a couple more for $20 one at a Lincoln dealer (I now have four keys for each of two vehicles). I programmed the computer, though. It was ~$50, each, to have the dealership program them.
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My service station guys lost the key to my 2005 caravan (they say in a car that was going to Newark for shipment to East Africa or something). I had a spare, and the chief said he would pay for a replacement. Local Chrysler dealer charged $275 ...
--
Best regards
Han
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Do yourself a big favor and get spares made now. If you still have to working keys you can buy inexpensive (relatively) chipped key blanks on Ebay, and have a locksmith cut them for you, then program them yourself. This why anyone with security keys needs to always have 3 programmed keys so if they lose one they still have two to use to program a new spare. If you only have one programmed key, you will have to have a dealer, or a locksmith with the capability, make new copies for you.
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in
is
so
locksmith
Three keys it is. The downside seems steep enough to warrant the $75 expense.
Thanks for your input!
-- Bobby G.
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I'm not sure about now...but when I worked with a locksmith in '99, the GM cars had 20 different chipped keys plus the 10s of 1000s of different key-cut combinations. You had a key-reader to find the proper chipped key blank, then cut the key. So, if you had a spare key (non-chipped) and then got your key chip number. You could have that in the event you lost the original!
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wrote:

chipped
that
have
inside
<<I'm not sure about now...but when I worked with a locksmith in '99, the GM cars had 20 different chipped keys plus the 10s of 1000s of different key-cut combinations. You had a key-reader to find the proper chipped key blank, then cut the key. So, if you had a spare key (non-chipped) and then got your key chip number. You could have that in the event you lost the original!>>
Yes, that's what I will do when I get Tru-Value to rework the plain key I had made for my wallet so even if I lost the keychain, I could wait for the locksmith INSIDE the van!
Thanks, Bob
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

I lost a key to a 2006 Chevy pickup once. Had to go to the dealer and prove ownership, they made me a key in 10 mins. based on the VIN#.
About $50.
--

"I don't like to discriminate against terrorists based on nationality.
If you declare war on the United States and you want to kill us,
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inside
Interesting. This car's had the original key replaced (insurance only paid for one key when the original van came with two) so I bought a second one, chipped, for $75 at TruValue by giving them the new key (the older, original keys will open, but not start, the van). So now I have two and that's probably enough because I can always clone the second key if the first is lost. I've got an entry only key for the wallet (had them make a plain copy - which doesn't work - bad cutting - but which will be recut by TruValue when I return to them). Now I have to see if I can hide the chipped spare in the car somewhere far enough from the steering column that it's not "seen" by the immobilizer circuit.
The reason I've asked all this is today I parked in a lot next to a storm drain grate and dropped my keys. Only exceptionally good luck kept them from sliding right into oblivion so I began to wonder how much of a tragedy that would be as I began to look for a chain to attach the keys to my pant's belt loop.
Good input from everyone and not the comedy fest I had feared with a potential straight line like the subject "What happens?" What happens is you could be seriously screwed or inconvenienced and for $75 it might not be a bad idea to buy some more insurance. I might even ask Tru-Value to give me the code for the chip in the key (they have to have a reader) that I can write on the wallet key as a little more (and cheaper) insurance that a locksmith can get me in if I screw up and dump the keys in a black hole.
-- Bobby G.
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I carry a spare un-chipped key in my wallet that will get me into the car. To start it I have a spare chipped key well hidden inside the car. Ace hardware will make a chip key for around $75 (which is a bargain over the dealer). Carrying a spare chiped key in the wallet hurts my ass because they are so thick.
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I do exactly the same as Rick .
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wrote:

chipped
that
have
inside
<<I carry a spare un-chipped key in my wallet that will get me into the car. To start it I have a spare chipped key well hidden inside the car. Ace hardware will make a chip key for around $75 (which is a bargain over the dealer). Carrying a spare chiped key in the wallet hurts my ass because they are so thick.>>
Sounds like a plan. I've always carried a wallet spare but those huge RF heads can sit you so off center it throws your back out of whack. The hidden key with a bunch of non-chipped entry keys in various places with maybe even the code, if the TruValue guy will give it to me.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Well, don't lose the "chipped" key. Instead, have one or more non-chipped duplicates made for $2 each. Take the original chipped key and glue it under the dash or somewhere close so the anti-theft mechanism can pick up the RFID signal when you attempt to start the car with a non-chipped key.
Hey, it only costs two bucks to TRY it.
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Robert Green wrote:

"I shouted HALT! One of them turned in my direction with what I believed was a weapon. In fear of my life, I discharged my weapon."
"Yeah, how'd it hit him in the back?"
"Just lucky, I guess."
As to why you'd disable a system, so doing might save you several hundred dollars to have a locksmith come to your disabled car, on a dark, rainy night, in a disreputable part of town, to let you in. In the alternative, call a wrecker and have your car towed to your destination while you ride safe and warm with the wrecker. You can then deal with the problem at your convenience.

Good point. The proposed solutions aren't for everyone. You have to consider whether living in a slum where you are constantly plagued with car thieves and burglars outweighs the cost and aggravation of a lost key.
MY spare key is bolted behind the license plate (shhh! don't tell anyone).
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Robert Green wrote:

Nah, just put 'em out by the curb.

Heh! Did you see the news article about a guy who put his battery charger on his Corvette to get it started? As he was putting away the charger, he left his car running. A passing hippie jumped into the car, raised the windows, locked the doors, and tried to drive off. Either uncoordinated, inexperienced, or stoned, he stalled the car. And, of course, it wouldn't start. He sat there, trapped, weeping, until the cops arrived.

Heh! When my daughter was 16, she "borrowed" her mother's car after midnight. And got a flat. She and her multitudes of boyfriends were able to change out the tire with the oversized donut spare.
The next morning, as the mother prepared to leave for work, she was mystified as to the strange tire on the left-rear wheel. This confusion continued for several days as the woman's finely-honed sense of logic ruminated on the bizarre condition. Finally, her conclusions came down to a) daughter, b) space aliens, c) a misguided practical joke, or d) a malevolent foreign god.

The bolt head can be turned with a dime. Failing that, I guess I could knock on doors until I found someone willing to loan me a tool.

So, get your neighborhood cop to order one for you. But you may be mistaken in your belief that the devices "help stop crime" or "electrify punks."
A rule in "Quality Control Thinking" is "What then?" That is, what do you do after you light up a goblin? If you just kind of stand around thinking "what now?" he'll eventually recover and rip off all your dangly-bits. Plan ahead. While he's out, put a plastic bag over his head. Be sure to remove it after... you know.
My view is that Tazers and their kin are for those who just want to torture the malefactor. I, myself, want to kill them.
And put their body out by the curb.
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On 10/28/2011 9:14 AM, HeyBub wrote:

we don't have curbs out in the country where i live. can i just put them at the end of my driveway with a 'for free' sign on them and hope a craigslister will come along?
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I just read some South American doctors were convicted of killing people just for their kidneys. If you get the timing right and have buyers lined up, a typical car thieving punk's got $200,000 in vital organs and various other stuff like skin and bone marrow. Just requires a kiddie pool, a bone saw and some scalpels, dry ice, giant Ziplocs and picnic coolers. That way, instead of him taking your car to the neighborhood "chop shop" you take him to your "body shop." It's poetic justice of the first degree.
Actually reminds me of something I heard a coroner say: "The first thing people do when they find a dead body is to poke it with a stick." I also heard him say if you're really unlucky and you poke a bloated one fresh out of the river, it can pop and spray death goo everywhere. Never seen it personally, though.
Considering what happened to me when hard-boiling eggs in the microwave, I can confirm that if something's ready to explode, it doesn't take much prodding to make it happen. The blast pattern of the exploding egg painted a perfect silhouette of me against the kitchen wall and it was only the slight vibration from opening the oven door that triggered it. There was a loud thud, like a firecracker in a trashcan and then suddenly I was covered in egg. I wonder if egg-splatter evidence has ever been used in a trial? -- Bobby G.
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