What fasteners to attach wood 2 x 4 to Cinder block foundation walls

I want to put up wood shelving (2 x 4) in my basement, which consists of cinder block foundation walls.
Can I use standard masonry screws or lag bolts to attach 2" x 4" lengths to the cinder block walls? Do I need additional fastener hardware? (eg. butterflies, special washers or inserts, etc.) Do I risk cracking or splitting the cinder blocks themselves with my hammer/drill?
Thanks.
F.Z. Newton MA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02 Jul 2003, Fred Zimmerman wrote:

How I would do it: Use a hammer drill to drill 1/2 holes in the block and use lead anchors that will hold lag bolts. Stagger them going up the 2x4, and make one vertical row fall right on a mortar seam. The holes/bolts that are going into the body of a block are prone to falling in sometimes (remember it's hollow behind that hole in many spots) and you need to work gingerly until the anchor really grabs the hole.
][ ][ <----- every other course of block will hit this mortar ----- ][ seam, make sure either of your anchors are hitting | o | ][ in that area (x) | | | x | | | ][ (compressed vertically for conserving space) | o | ][ | | | x | | | ][ | o | ][ | | etc -----
If the shelves are less than 5' wide I would use one riser about 8-12" in from each end (adjusted for finding those mortar seams!) and if they're 5'+ I would heavily consider using one somewhere near the middle.
If you use a hammer action drill and masonary bits* you should have little/no chance of damaging a block. *you might want to start with a smaller pilot hole and then drill the bigger one, just like you might do with some larger holes in wood.
TP -- _________________________________________ If u are gonna say that I said something, please say what I REALLY said. ($1 Earl)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fred Zimmerman wrote:

There are several options. You should use a liner of some sort. This can be platic for light wieght or the larger lead shields for heavier duty. Take care with the lead shields if your sizing is off they can crack the face when they separate as you torque them. Another product to look at is TAPCON these are softer material screws that collapse their threads and create their own anchor when driven in. Nice product and almost no chance of splitting. You do have to use thier bit though because the size of the hole is absolutely critical and the sizing of the cheaper masonary bits varies enough that they may not bite.
In terms of drilling Cinder block is not hard at all they will tend to try to split when torque is applied but they are fine with heat and compression. So drill straight with your hammer drill and let the tool do the work. This isn't to save the block but rather your bit. A little water to lubricate and cool the are will not hurt either.
--
JSin
Lost Generation Custom Tattoo
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Fred Zimmerman) wrote in message

Are you sure they are cinderblock not concrete block? If they were concrete block you could use a nail gun (like I did). If cinderblock, see the previous post. Another option would be to run 2X4 standards from floor to ceiling, attaching them to the sill plate or joists at the top and maybe applying some construction adhesive on the backside to prevent any shifting around. Basically the weight of the shelves will just press the standards against the wall, provided they are attached securely at the top. That might be easier than all the drilling and anchors and such.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03 Jul 2003, Heathcliff Bambino wrote:

Gulp. I always thought those were just two differnet names for the same thing? 'round these parts we call them "concrete blocks", and I figured the "cinder" thing was just a regional variation. Uhhh, if you got a second, what's the difference? TP -- _________________________________________ If u are gonna say that I said something, please say what I REALLY said. ($1 Earl)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HACK!!!
If you don't know, keep your mouth shut!!!
HACK!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also consider, if you have one or can borrow one, the cartridge powered fastening systems. I just bought a Remington brand trigger-actuated .22 cal powered nailer, and it's the nuts. The directions (quite exstensive) that came with the tool describe using this type of fastening system for 2X4 lumber to brick or block walls. The only caveat seems to be to make sure that you power-nail into horizontal mortar joints and never vertical ones. I used mine with the 2 1/2" washered nails to attach 2X4 plates to a poured concrete basement floor, and it worked great.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.