What does the water company charge you for?

Page 4 of 6  


If you wanted a large lush yard.... why the hell are you living in a desert? Quit wasting water.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

I have to agree but I think one reasons is that the water is cheap compared to other places. It flows down the Colorado right into their back yard.
So if they conserve, where does it go? Back into the Pacific Ocean.
From what I have seen, not many in LV have very much grass. Perhaps much of that usage is the Casinos with their huge fountains etc. And, to supply all the tourists with baths and showers!! Lots of water used in the larger air conditioning systems too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Colorado river is supposed to flow into Mexico but they are always complaining that we used all the water before they got any. It is a dry riverbed for much of the year. The next place to dry up will be the Imperial Valley in California, if they don't curtail use of the water up stream..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
st areas of the country, 100 gpd is more common as I recall.

which is why all residential irrigation ought to be outlawed. Which it is getting pretty close to in LV I understand. Stupid ass waste of drinking water. SHHH, don't tell my wife...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not just residential irrigation, either. On a business trip to Phoenix some ten or twelve years ago, I was appalled to see from the air all the swimming pools, lush lawns, and heavily irrigated golf courses. Once on the ground and headed to my meetings, what do I see in the plaza at the Phoenix civic center, but this fountain:
http://tinyurl.com/38y86m
There might be a few fountains in the world that are more efficient at evaporating water than that one, but not many, I'll wager. Especially in that climate.
Then, about my third day there, the local paper had a big article about a new business that was coming to the area just north of Phoenix -- all excited about the several hundred jobs it would provide. The business? A fish farm.
These people just don't understand that they're living in a desert.
Helloooo! Reality check time! Deserts aren't supposed to be green and wet. If you want swimming pools, and green lawns and golf courses, then move to some place that has plenty of water.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ya, like friggin New Orleans! HAR HAR!
--
Steve Barker



"Doug Miller" < snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

It's my understanding (I live 2k mi. from AZ) that Phoenix gets their water from underground, not the Rio Grande and has plenty more where that came form.
<snip>
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
krw wrote:

dump their waste into the river and let the next city downstream take care of it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <nuzth.452225$Fi1.215799@bgtnsc05-

--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
krw wrote:

So? What should be done with the water? Let it flow into the ocean?
It isn't being used up. If you are depriving someone downstream of drinking water that is something else. But if you can recycle and use it for your pleasure I really can't see anything wrong with that.
Not like burning up several gallons of gasoline to drive to a beach.
Los Angeles brings water hundreds of miles and when it has been cleaned up it dumps it into the ocean. Same with most sea side cities. That seems to me to be a waste.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Municipal water is pumped and treated, and that consumes a significant amount electricity as well as other resources.
Since you speak of LA, according to a report prepared for the California Energy Commission, in southern California, an average of 1.3 kWh of electricity is used to process each 100 gallons of water consumed. If we use the 100 gallons per person, per day, average rate of consumption others have mentioned here, the supply of water to a four-person household would require just a little over 1,900 kWh/year.
Looking at the full picture, in 2001, total water-related energy use in the state of California came to 48,013 GWh -- that's 19.2 per cent of the state's total energy use of 250,494 GWh. I think you will agree, the numbers are not exactly trivial.
Source: http://www.energy.ca.gov/2006publications/CEC-500-2006-118/CEC-500-2006-118.PDF
Cheers. Paul

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paul M. Eldridge wrote:

The last I remember is that all that processed water is dumped in the ocean. Naturally don't want to dump raw sewage but I would think it could be recycled. There was a big plant along the beach between Redondo and Culver City. (I used to drive that way to work a few hundred years ago). They may well be doing some recycling now.
I often thought they should pump it out on the desert.
A town in the desert to the south east was reclaiming all their water. After being cleaned it flowed through a series of about 5 lakes. By the time it got to the last one it was ready for drinking again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <uGAth.805099$QZ1.696422@bgtnsc04-

How about let it evaporate (we *were* talking about irrigation of lawns, golf courses and swimming pools).

Downstream? Try reading for comprehension.

Not like?

threadlet?
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your understanding is incorrect. http://phoenix.gov/WATER/wtr100intro.html

I'd be astonished if Phoenix gets any water at all from the Rio Grande, since:
a) the city has an extensive system of canals and aqueducts from the Verde, Salt, and Gila Rivers, all of which are _right_there_, and
b) the Rio Grande is nearly five hundred miles to the east.
And, no, there's not "plenty more". What part of "in the desert" do you have such a hard time understanding?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 24, 6:01 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

well, both of you are not completely right, but keith is way more wrong.
a good deal of phoenix water currently comes from stored lakes, both underground aquifers and surface lakes, snow pack from further north in arizona and in colorado. furthermore, a good deal of phoenix (and other southwestern cities) water comes from the colorado river via the central arizona project canal, which is uphill. the rio grande would be downhill, by a good deal, and much further away.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
krw wrote:

Verde and Colorado Rivers and relies on snowfall in the mountains for that water. While they do store excess water underground, their main sources of water are the rivers, and what they draw from there is not available downstream.
The idea that underground water is inexhaustible is laughable. There have been plenty of instances of aqifiers being overdrawn and either exhausted or contaminated. Many communities have recognized this and it it common that partially treated wastewater us used for landscaping purposes.
I think I read that our fastest growing communities are in Arizona, or other desert locales, and as they grow, we will have to become more and more aggressive in managing out water supplies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or, of course, simply bill people for what it actually costs to deliver the water to them, and let them manage their own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

if you're thinking that there is a subsidy, there isn't. we're billed what it costs, along with taxes and a profit for the many water companies, for the water that is actually delivered. what there isn't is a penalty to ensure that there will be water in the future.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nonsense. There's a HUGE hidden subsidy: the portion of your water-delivery infrastructure, including dams, that was built with Federal tax money. Even though I live in Indianapolis, I'm paying part of the cost of *your* water delivery. If you had to pay what it actually cost, including the cost of those dams and canals, you couldn't possibly afford it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.