What does the water company charge you for?

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mm wrote:

to the third decimal place not just whole numbers. I know that CCF on my bill are to the fourth decimal place as is the charge per CCF in dollars.

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On Sun, 21 Jan 2007 00:15:41 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

OK. I've never gotten a water bill from the water company. It seems we would have to pay someone to read each house's meter, so we just let them read the main meter and divide by 109, the number of houses.
So I get a bill from the HOA management company, with no details at all, just a dollar amount.

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And 109 people are OK with that? Only way I'd accept that policy is if I was one of the user abusers and let the other homeowners subsidize me. Get a copy of the real bill, read your own meter and see if you are getting screwed.
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wrote:

Most people are like sheep. And it's more than 109, because people sell and new people buy, and I've only heard one person ask and no one complain. These were starter homes for the first set of buyers, and I'm told Americans on average move every 5 years, so in 27 years it must be close to 400**
**I lowered this because I think they only get every five years by counting college and grad students and the low-ranks of the army who might move every year.

It requires a 5-sided socket to open the box for my meter. Although maybe vice grips would do it. The bill is low anyhow. I'll have to look for a new bill but I vaguely remember years ago it was 20 dollars every three months.
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If that is the case, no reason to complain or check anything. Just pay and smile. My bill for three months runs about $110.
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Harry K wrote:

gallons. In fact, acre-feet is used for large amounts of water. OTOH, it makes no sense to call the units "units." It would be much simpler to use CCF (for 100 cubic feet) as the unit, as apparently do many water utilities.

simply long used standards for sales, but they currently often make no sense. Why would you measure potatoes in sacks instead of hundred weight and why would you use bushels instead of tons for corn? There is an obvious reason for doing so but it has little meaning to the ordinary consumer.

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Harry K wrote:

Not for me. I know how much a gallon is and I can relate to using any quantity. Using x units of water makes no intuitive sense to me.
A "ton" has a uniform definition.
In order for it to make sense to me I would have to determine what the "unit" might mean.
Would you buy a car if it was advertised to get "50 miles per unit"?
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Do you mean a short ton, a long ton, or a metric ton?
    Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.invalid says...

Only because you haven't troubled yourself to find out what units your water utility is using.

Uh-huh. Right. Which "ton" are you talking about, the one that weighs 2000 pounds, the one that weighs 2240 pounds, or the one that weighs 1000 kilograms?

So how hard is it, exactly, to call the water utility and ask them what it means?
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says...

That would require a local phonecall, using a telephone, and speaking to another human being.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

And not a problem if there was some sensible reason to do it.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Since I am in the US the standard commercial definition of a ton is 2,000 lbs. A 1000 kg mass is spelled "tonne" to distinguish it from others. The "ton" that is derived from Imperial measurement is noted as a "long ton" to distinguish it from others.

So how hard is it, exactly, to just state an actual commonly used volume such as gallons instead of inventing a unit of measure called "unit" that requires someone to inquire what it might mean?
It just plain silly to reinvent stuff like that especially in the case of water there is a really common volume measurement that is recognized by everyone. What if you walked into a bakery and donuts were priced $5/unit? or you were interested in a new car and found that the fuel economy was 25 miles/unit?
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Aound here, Safeway price their donuts by the dozen. However, Safeway have also redefined the dozen as 14 donuts. Which all goes to prove that... stuff happens.
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Go back in history to that dim time when primitive computer systems used tape storage, magnetic core memory and single registers of limited capacity. Processing bills for say, a thousand residential customers took hours rather than seconds as it would today. Every reduction in the number of bits manipulated by a computer meant that less expensive hardware could be used, and resulted in signifcant, measurable reductions in expensive and limited processing time.
At the same time, the units used in engineering to calculate resevoir and tank capacity, volume flow in pipes and tubes, etc. all used cubic feet or other units more directly related to cubic feet rather than gallons. So in fact, the historical measure in a given area may well have been cubic feet from the beginning of metered water supply in that area, rather than gallons. In such an area, changing to gallons would be the arbitrary decision.
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When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 15:17:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

It was always "thousands of gallons" in the DC area, dating back as far as I can remember (long before computers). I suspect they went to Cu/Ft "units" as a way to trick people who were used to 1000 gallons as the billing unit. This allowed them to make you think you were still getting 1000 gallons for "x" dollars but it is only 748
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

I don't think it would be the nerd who is responsible. Decisions like that are often made by the creative ambiguity manager of the marketing department. And it even extends to stuff like life insurance. You may have heard that sleezy TV commercial "you can buy life insurance for only $10/unit".
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Dilbert's boss is running the world. Seriously. Or, Dogbert.
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Our water is measured in cubic metres and I suspect that's true for most of the world (i.e., outside of the United States). There are 1,000 litres per cubic metre.
I received my water bill earlier this week. Here's the breakdown:
Days in billing period: 102 days Total consumption: 14 cubic metres Daily consumption: 137 litres/day (36.4 US gallons)
Total charges came to $55.23 and consisted of the following:
Basic meter charge: $34.98 Water: $5.28 Environmental Protection: $10.46 Wastewater Management: $4.60
We are a two-person household and our home is equipped with low-flush toilets, low-flow showerheads, and a water-efficient front load washer and dishwasher (BOSCH). We're not overly cautious in our water use (e.g., during this billing period I power washed our home, back patio and driveway), but neither do we believe in wasting it.
Cheers, Paul
On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 09:12:52 -0600, "Steve Barker"

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On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 23:19:29 -0600, "Steve Barker"

Or acre-feet, or whatever gives you reasonable-sized numbers to feed into your spreadsheet. Does anyone but the U.S. still use gallons?
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Steve Barker wrote:

There are many units of volume used world wide. The most common, universal and easy to use metrically around much of the world, is litres. US neighbour Canada officially uses litres but still 'thinks' in gallons, but that's Imperial gallons (which are about) 20% larger than US ones. In North America we use so much water that even domestically measuring in gallons is cumbersome. So units such as those mentioned (One unit = 748 gallons etc.) are the norm.
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