What do you put on a brown wood door facing the sun & rain?

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"Tony Palermo" wrote:

WHY?
You will come to regret stain (Bug Snot) unless you sell the place and pass the problem along.
Spar varnish is designed to remain flexible which is why it is used on wooden spars. Definitely not a good choice for a door.
Sonny has outlined the path to glory.
A LOT of work, but truly the only way to go.
The marine finish of choice would be Epifanes.
Check out Jamestown Distributors for Epifanes info.
BTW, where is this property located as in how far South of the Mason-Dixon Line?
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

But UV protection might not be easy to decide from the can printing.

Does this look like the right stuff? http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid
Epifanes clear marine spar varnish is formulated with tung oil, phenolic and alkyd resins and U.V. filters for superior protection.

San Diego. It never rains. But when it rains it pours.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

------------------------------------------------------- "Tony Palermo" wrote:

Nothing is wrong with a darker color, but let Mother Nature provide it.
If you EVER have to make a repair of a damaged part that has been stained, you will cuss the day you ever used stain on that door.
--------------------------------------------------------------

Mikey likes it <grin>. ----------------------------------------------------------

Tell me about it, I'm in LA.
BTW, lots of good marine suppliers in S/D.
San Diego Marine Exchange for one.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

We all learn that eventually, don't we? Unfortunately, we generally learn it the hard way :(
Stain is a spawn of the devil.
--

dadiOH
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Norminn wrote:

I had a sizeable sailboat for 20 years and used a fair amount of varnish. Most of it was plain old marine varnish, some spar. I don't recalll any of it being particularly thick, always planned on four to six or more coats on bare wood.
Then a few years ago I built a sailing dinghy to use on our lake and bought some marine spar to use on the transoms and spars. That varnish was, indeed, quite thick. I'm just guessing but maybe the manufacturers have started using less solvent because people have become too lazy to apply numerous coats. At any rate, some thinner made it nice and brushable.
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dadiOH
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walter wrote:

This is a great plan because it allows me to stain and restore the mahogany wood door.

This is interesting. I will look for it at Home Depot.
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Tony Palermo wrote:

a very good marine grade varnish with UV protection. Many varnishes come in colors, and matte or shiny. Spar varnish would work for the door and frame (it feels hard but is actually fairly flexible so it doesn't crack when the wood expands or shrinks. But it shouldn't be used for the sill, as it wears easily when you walk on it.
You should remove the door so you can finish all 6 sides so you never get water under the varnish. The best varnishes are designed to be thinned quite a bit before application, so you end up with 6 or 8 thin coats, rather than one thick lumpy one. And with any varnish, you should recoat periodically, at least every other year, depending on the exposure. To apply well, you need a very good brush, with natural bristles, such as badger.
Don't expect to find really good varnishes at home centers.
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