What could possibly be under stucco that can't be drilled through

I mounted an 802.11 WiFi antenna and was dismayed to find two drill bits dulled (I don't think I've dulled more than that in my entire life) just trying to drill an inch through stucco to mount an antenna.
There is 'something' as hard as a steel beam one inch under the stucco near the roofline that just can't be drilled through.
What could possibly be there (in the wall?)?
The reason I ask is I have to replace the flimsy mounting arm with a stronger one from a Dish TV installation - so I'm going to have the problem again.
I'll choose a new location - but I don't have much choice within a few feet given I need line of sight to the WISP access point.
What could it be that is hard as steel one inch below the stucco?
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I'll let others speculate on what you're hitting, but steel can be readily drilled.
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Not so well with a masonry bit.
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On 7/31/2012 8:53 AM, Vinny P. wrote:

the normal stucco coating is put on over various things.
usually, it's: frame sheathing tar paper (or equivalent) styrofoam chickenwire stucco coats (2)
you could be hitting a nail or screw, or some sort of metal sheathing at the corners. i can't see where you're drilling from here. does the bit come out with metal slivers? try a metal bit once you get to the hard depth.
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On Tuesday, July 31, 2012 8:53:32 AM UTC-7, Vinny P. wrote:

1.Try a better quality drill bit and don’t let it get hot which is very easy to do when it’s covered in stucco. Pull it out frequently and dip it in water when it’s still warm before it gets hot. 2. Make sure you don’t have anything like a gas, water or electrical line under that steel or you may get a big surprise when you finally drill through it. I know I have had some surprises like that.
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Vinny P. wrote:

Steel, probably. Once you are through the stucco switch to a regular twist bit - masonry bits are good for masonry, not much else - and try your luck.
--

dadiOH
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This is not entirely true. When I encounter steel that is hard to drill, and dulls all the standard twist drill bits, I always grab a carbide tipped masonry drill bit. It may be slow, but it always bores thru the steel. The key is to run the drill slow and apply moderate pressure to the drill.
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On Jul 31, 3:49 pm, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

My house is stucco and from time to time I have tried to drill a hole outside and failed -- just won't work. I even bought an electric drill just for that purpose. My late husband had a battery operated drill and it was never strong enough to drill anywhere on stucco. The new one will work -- but in certain places it won't. Think there must be those steel plates...or something near the edges of windows.
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On Jul 31, 3:49 pm, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

Could be anything. I would probably chisel out an opening large enough to see before forcing through a steel part. Conduit, water pipe, vent pipe, hidden wall safe full of ....... I'll be right over!!
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I might also think you could see into the hole with a light after going through the stucco.
Greg
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Vinny P. wrote the following on 7/31/2012 11:53 AM (ET):

You probably hit a metal framing hanger (or framing metal hanger) in that first area.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Probably a steel support of some kind. Here's how I wold handle it. Find a cobalt drill bit the correct size for tapped threads of the bolts you plan to use. Drill out the hole and tap threads into the steel with proper techniques. Insert bolt and tighten, and if there is sufficient material to act as a retaining nut, go with that, adding other tapped holes as needed by the mount. If the 'steel' is too flimsy, drill out for the bolt clearance (cobalt, again) and use conventional bolt + nut. Use care drilling if you are on a ladder.
Joe
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A photo of the immediate area and a general photo would sure be helpful!!!!!!
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Vinny P. wrote:

There is no compelling reason to put a satellite dish on the roof. The difference of twenty feet in 200 miles is undetectable. A better place for mounting is on a deck. Another good spot is on a fence pole set in concrete.
Having the thing reachable also makes it possible to remove the snow - if you're in that sort of climate.
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It has to have a line-of-sight to the satellite, free of trees and all that. It's often easier to put them on the roof than elsewhere. I agree, though, it's not a good idea if there is any reasonable alternative.

Snow? ;-)
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On 7/31/2012 11:53 AM, Vinny P. wrote:

If it's a natural gas pipe or a nail plate, you should prolly stop drilling there.
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