What color laser printer is easily & cheaply refilled at home from non OEM toner?

Page 2 of 4  


Why is Epson not recommended in the US (I assume most posters here are in the US)? Epson is great for photos, although as I concentrate on linux Canon driver development I only use Epson as a backup. I buy 3rd party inks for my Epson, haven't tried refilling it. I'm not aware of any problems with the ink cartridges, but maybe there are, which is why Epson is not being discussed here?
--
Gernot Hassenpflug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2012-08-20 22:07:52 -0700, Gernot Hassenpflug

Nobody has said anything about Epson not being recommended for photo printing. There are many of us using Epson printers and are quite happy with them, actually, very happy. I believe there are some R3880, R3000, and some of the more exotic Epson users here. I am using an R2880. I also have a disappointing Canon i9900 which has never given me results anywhere close to those my R2880 gives me.
I think the issue the OP has, is a particular one with HP and color laser printers and the manner in which HP chips its toner cartridges. I believe he wants a color laser printer which will give him adequate results for photographs, as he rightly feels that the cost of inks for photo quality ink jet printers is excessive. The bottom line is, there is no free, or low budget ride, when it comes to producing quality photo prints at home, or anywhere else for that matter.
--
Regards,

Savageduck
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 23:14:41 -0700, Savageduck wrote:

Wow. Nice synopsys!
In my naive days, I bought multiple HP ink printers from Costco, such as the HP d135, which, due to the extreme expense of replacement ink tanks, I naturally got very good at refilling. However, as noted, it should NEVER be as difficult as HP purposefully makes it to simply refill an ink tank - so - over the years, this frustration soured me on any and all HP inkjets, swearing them off forever - and feeling good about that decision.
Still needing a printer, I immediately matured when I bought for about $600 in those days, an HP laserjet 3200m, soon coming to the realization that there 'was' a better way, which was B&W laser printing. Refilling the C4092A is basically uneventfully trivial.
The kids/wife wanting a color printer notwithstanding, it 'appears' that a color laser printer is not going to be acceptable for family photos; hence I'm back to the only choice feasible - which is ink printers - which I've previously sworn off forever (at least HP ink printers).
Finding out that almost all manufacturers make ink refilling difficult, it appears that I'll have to choose my printer in reverse. That is, find one that allows refilling - and then buy THAT printer.
This appears to be the only feasible method, although this entire process of realization makes me want to kiss my trusty B&W printer in retrospect.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Le Tue, 21 Aug 2012 14:07:52 +0900, Gernot Hassenpflug a écrit :

I don't have an Epson printer at home, but I have seen Epson printed photos and HP printed conterparts. I mostly noticed that Epson colours seem to fade a lot faster than HP's. True enough, the fading of HP prints, although slow, is an awful lot faster than that of old photos that were chemically treated !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 Aug 2012 22:22:09 +0000 (UTC), "J.G."

Last time I needed to buy a new AIO Inkie I was going to avoid HP. I read all the reviews I could find, compared features and user satisfaction, plus looked at reported problems. I Finally settled on a Canon that sounded REALLY good from the reviews. After getting it I was VERY disappointed in it's print quality for text and photos, it just did not match the quality on simple run of the mill daily printing that I was used to from my old defunct (my fault) HP. Some users had mentioned it's lengthy startup time for the first page but it didn't sound too bad so I still bought it. Start up time turned out to be a HUGE pain in the butt. If it sat for more then a few minutes it seemingly parked it's print heads and then when you went to print again there was all sorts of start up racket and delay while it brought the heads out of cold storage. Then I discovered that in what it considered normal mixed color and b/w printing it used a mix of all the color inks to produce the "black" which came out more like a dark charcoal. So its prints looked lousy and used up all the color ink!! I took it back and returned to an HP AIO. Good luck with your search!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I happily used one of the allegedly better quality EPSON-compatible inks for a few years. Not the cheapest, but a good reputation on the web. My own tests had shown me only slight differences in colour, not worth paying all the extra for unless I wanted to do some exhibition quality prints. Which I sometimes did. And so sometimes I ended up doing a few of my family snaps with EPSON inks, and most with the same good quality replacement ink.
My wife pinned those she liked best on the kitchen wall, carefully choosing a position the sun never reached. Nevertheless after a year all the replacement inks had browned off like old masters, whereas the EPSON ink snaps were still bright and colorful. After two years the compatible prints looked like fading sepia prints, whereas the EPSON ink prints still looked newly minted.
So now I stick to the printer maker's inks. Have you tried any lightfast fading tests on your 3rd party inks?
--
Chris Malcolm

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, many of the Canon inkjets which, after all, are made for photo-printing, improve the shades of grey by using other colors. This is quite natural since the point of using them is to print quality photos.
However, if one wants to use the printer for other things, which is also natural, such as low-cost B/W printing, then one has to ensure that the printer comes with at least one plain media mode (not the highest or even medium quality one, in most cases) that prints only using black ink. Then one uses that.
There is a whole range of Canon printers dealing with this problem by shipping with two cartridges: black and color. One can then select black-only cartridge and print all one's work only in black. Refilling either cartridge is also trivial.
--
Gernot Hassenpflug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Aug 2012 13:11:32 +0900, Gernot Hassenpflug

The single Canon I tried did have both black and color carts. Yet it insisted on using the color mix for black unless you did something to force it to use the black - I forget the details now. You could work around it but it was a pain to deal with and simply wasn't a problem with the HP. The thing that surprised me most was that so many reviewers raved about its print quality and it was clearly, at least to my eye, inferior to HP for the 90% of the printing I do. When doing 4x6 color on glossy photo paper it did fine but no better then the HP.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

/../
Er, of course. You have to select the black cartridge. The printer is not a mind-reader! This ability is what is special. In the other range of models, which have 4 or more separate ink tanks, you also usually have one or more black-only modes for plain media in the mono mode selection, but it is not guaranteed: they might all use other inks as well, that is controlled in the firmware.
With the range I described above, you can select black cartridge only in the driver.

It is up to the printer manufacturer to determine what quality to give for mono modes. Some use only black ink, some use other inks as well for high-quality mono modes, and black only for lower qualit mono modes. You can't rely on the next model having the same specs there.
--
Gernot Hassenpflug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 Aug 2012 06:47:42 -0700, SMS wrote:

That's sage advice!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/18/2012 6:43 PM, J.G. wrote:

I have a friend who uses a Tektronix/Xerox color laser printer. It's not main stream, and the toner is expensive, but he trolls EBAY and buys up toner when it shows up cheap. He figgers he has two lifetime supplies of toner.
Might be interesting to see what toner shows up on EBAY and buy that printer.
I bought some mono refill kits for my Laserjet almost 20 years ago. Never used 'em because I keep buying full cartridges that show up on Craigslist. Got a closet full of 'em. And another closet full of $2 garage sale laserjets. Life is good here in B&W land ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J.G. wrote:

I have two Minoltas. Magicolor 1600W and Magicolor 2530DL. Both are, and have been, re-filled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 20:31:53 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

Can you refill with non-OEM toner? And can you refill each color tank separately?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J.G. wrote:

Yes and yes
Suggestion: If you find a printer you like, check Ebay for refill kits. If no kits are available, well...
Caution: Some (all?) printers have chips on the cartridges that inform the printer when it's out of toner. Just adding toner is insufficient for making the cartridge work - you have to replace the chip. Refill kits usually come with replacement chips. The chips are about 1/3rd the size of a postage stamp and are held in place by one teeny phillips screw. No big deal to replace them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 06:37:10 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

Certainly the Hewlett Packard HP d135 officejet that I had owned contained the evil ink tank chip; but the B&W HP laser printer that I now have, has nothing of the sort.
So it's not 'all' printers ... luckily for us!
The task is to find a color laserwriter that allows refilling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J.G. wrote:

Hi, If your decision is to get a color laser AIO, Brother is not bad. set of 4 cart. on eBay goes for ~80.00 including S&H. Another thing to consider is power consumption when running. Some use more than a KW. (generates some heat) I believe Brother uses about 600W or so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 21:51:52 -0600, Tony Hwang wrote:

BTW, I don't need an 'all in one' printer.
I already have the HP laserjet 3200m B&W all-but-one printer: a) It's a printer b) It's a fax machine c) It's a copier (but it is a sheet-feed copier) d) It's a scanner (but it is a sheet-feed scanner)
So the only thing it doesn't do is scan big stuff because it's not a flat bed style.
BTW, I learned, by accident, that this 'office style' HP laserjet 3200m printer is MUCH MUCH MUCH more robust than my 'home style' HP d135 printer.
So, one 'trick' is to avoid the home marketed printers in favor of the office-marketed printers.
At least that has been my experience so far with refilling the toner.
Hmmmmm.... Are there 'any' office style inkjets? Or are all the office-style color printers lasers?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J.G. wrote:

Hi, They are pricy. Home style light duty ones will do fair monthly duty cycle, light in weight and small foot print. Maybe you should go to Staples, have a look of all the demo units.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 07:37:47 -0600, Tony Hwang wrote:

I just googled "small business color laser printer", which came up with:
PC World: Top 10 Color Laser Printers February 2010 (http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/collection/1674/top_10_color_laser_printers.html ) 1. Dell 5130cdn Color Laser Printer 2. Lexmark C748de 3. Lexmark C792de 4. HP Color LaserJet Enterprise CP4025dn Printer 5. Dell C3760dn 6. Samsung CLP-775ND Color Laser Printer 7. OKI Printing Solutions C330dn 8. Brother HL-4570CDW 9. Dell 2150cdn 10. Xerox ColorQube 8570DN
Consumer Search: Color Laser Printers : December 2011 (http://www.consumersearch.com/color-laser-printers/small-office-printers ) 1. Brother HL-4570CDW (*Est. $350 2. Lexmark C792de (*Est. $1500) 3. Xerox Phaser 6280N (*Est. $350) a. Dell 5130cdn (*Est. $950)
About.com: Top 7 Color Laser Printers http://sbinfocanada.about.com/od/officemachines/tp/colorlaser.htm 1. Dell 5130cdn 2. OKI C610DN 3. Brother HL4570CDW 4. Lexmark C544DW 5. Brother HL-4150CDN 6. Dell 2150CDN 7. Xerox Phaser 6010N
I see the 'problem' with the small office color laser printers. a) They're pricey b) They're huge c) They don't do photos well
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/collection/1674/top_10_color_laser_printers.html )
I have the HP CP4025dn. It has been a great printer for the last couple of years. No problems, great prints. I use HP toner. For the good jobs I use HP paper. Photo's look pretty good especially if you use HP photo paper however they are not as good as a inkjet printer. For photos I use an Epson R1900. I use Epson ink. I use Epson paper. Great photos. Good as any you buy.
They're pricey. They're huge. I am happy to pay it. When I replace these the new ones will be bigger and more expensive.
Not only are the printers large but the paper and supplies for them require considerable additional space and money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.