What causes warped entry door?

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On 4/26/2012 11:17 AM, dpb wrote:

Later today, I'm going over to the development that runs the complex of well over 100 units (mostly 4-plexes). They may have an extra door available at a reasonable price.
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On 4/18/2012 2:59 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

On 4/18/2012 2:59 PM, Rebel1 wrote: > This house had a double wooden entry door, each door being about 40" > wide. One is rarely used; the other is for everyday use. The everyday > door is bowed at the latch side toward the inside of the house by about > 1/8-3/16". (The hinge side is okay.) So to engage the latch and > deadbolts into their strike plates, one must push the lock area really > hard toward the outdoors or slam the door closed hard. > > The first thing I will try doing is repositioning the door stops. I've > read several methods for reversing the warp, and may try one of those > measures. > > The real question is why should just one of the doors warp? Both are > exposed to the same temperature differentials. Both doors have outer > storm doors with glass panels during New Jersey's winter season. The > colors on both sides of both doors match, but I can't guarantee that > both sides of both doors are painted with the same type paint (latex vs. > oil). The house was built in 1993. > > R1
I went back to the house Monday, April 23, intending to photograph the door and post the photos. Oddly, everything changed over the weekend, during which it rained close to 2.5" starting Saturday night and continuing well into Sunday.
The door no longer bowed inward at the lock area by 1/8-3/16". Now the bow was only about 1/16", and the locks clicked into their strike plates fairly easily. The top of the door, which had been flush with the mating, rarely used door, was now twisted a bit *away* from the house interior, and the bottom of the door, which also had been flush with the adjacent door, now bowed toward the *inside* of the house.
Apparently the 24 hours of very high humidity had the effect of somewhat straightening the lock edge of the door, while at the same time adding a somewhat uniform top-to-bottom twist to that edge.
Odd thing, an identical house one block away doesn't suffer from any of these problems. The conspicuous difference is that the problem house gets morning sun on its doors, while the other one gets afternoon sun. But as one poster suggested, might have something to do with the cut of the wood used in the stiles and rails.
My plan now is to wait for a period of several dry days, put the door on saw horses, weigh the bowed/twisted places until everything is planar, then paint it with an oil-based paint for moisture immunity. This is tricky, since when the weights are removed the door will tend back to the bowed/twisted position, forcing trial and error for maybe days and leaving the house with an unsecured entrance.
Probably easier to replace it, if it's available by itself without the adjacent door.
R1
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On 4/18/2012 2:59 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

On 4/18/2012 2:59 PM, Rebel1 wrote: > This house had a double wooden entry door, each door being about 40" > wide. One is rarely used; the other is for everyday use. The everyday > door is bowed at the latch side toward the inside of the house by about > 1/8-3/16". (The hinge side is okay.) So to engage the latch and > deadbolts into their strike plates, one must push the lock area really > hard toward the outdoors or slam the door closed hard. > > The first thing I will try doing is repositioning the door stops. I've > read several methods for reversing the warp, and may try one of those > measures. > > The real question is why should just one of the doors warp? Both are > exposed to the same temperature differentials. Both doors have outer > storm doors with glass panels during New Jersey's winter season. The > colors on both sides of both doors match, but I can't guarantee that > both sides of both doors are painted with the same type paint (latex vs. > oil). The house was built in 1993. > > R1
On 4/18/2012 2:59 PM, Rebel1 wrote: > This house had a double wooden entry door, each door being about 40" > wide. One is rarely used; the other is for everyday use. The everyday > door is bowed at the latch side toward the inside of the house by about > 1/8-3/16". (The hinge side is okay.) So to engage the latch and > deadbolts into their strike plates, one must push the lock area really > hard toward the outdoors or slam the door closed hard. > > The first thing I will try doing is repositioning the door stops. I've > read several methods for reversing the warp, and may try one of those > measures. > > The real question is why should just one of the doors warp? Both are > exposed to the same temperature differentials. Both doors have outer > storm doors with glass panels during New Jersey's winter season. The > colors on both sides of both doors match, but I can't guarantee that > both sides of both doors are painted with the same type paint (latex vs. > oil). The house was built in 1993. > > R1
I went back to the house Monday, April 23, intending to photograph the door and post the photos. Oddly, everything changed over the weekend, during which it rained close to 2.5" starting Saturday night and continuing well into Sunday.
The door no longer bowed inward at the lock area by 1/8-3/16". Now the bow was only about 1/16", and the locks clicked into their strike plates fairly easily. The top of the door, which had been flush with the mating, rarely used door, was now twisted a bit *away* from the house interior, and the bottom of the door, which also had been flush with the adjacent door, now bowed toward the *inside* of the house.
Apparently the 24 hours of very high humidity had the effect of somewhat straightening the lock edge of the door, while at the same time adding a somewhat uniform top-to-bottom twist to that edge.
Odd thing, an identical house one block away doesn't suffer from any of these problems. The conspicuous difference is that the problem house gets morning sun on its doors, while the other one gets afternoon sun. But as one poster suggested, might have something to do with the cut of the wood used in the stiles and rails.
My plan now is to wait for a period of several dry days, put the door on saw horses, weigh the bowed/twisted places until everything is planar, then paint it with an oil-based paint for moisture immunity. This is tricky, since when the weights are removed the door will tend back to the bowed/twisted position, forcing trial and error for maybe days and leaving the house with an unsecured entrance.
Probably easier to replace it, if it's available by itself without the adjacent door.
R1
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