What causes air in water pipes?

Page 2 of 2  
YvonneD wrote:

I admire your diligence.
The air has to be coming from somewhere! If the water's not too hot, it's not steam. If you don't see the same thing on the cold side, air is not being pumped into your system from the supply lines.
The only other thing if COULD be is a miracle - or the opposite: a demon. In either case, I'd call the Church.
Just on the wild side, ask your neighbors if they have any funny business with their water supply. Can't hurt to ask.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks.
Actually I've had some air in the cold water pipes too. That's been going on for over a year and doesn't seem to happen in the winter. Maybe it is from the main inlet, although my neighbor across the street doesn't have this problem.
The plumber is coming next week.
thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Could be cavitation.
Any valves connecting water to your heater should be 'full on'. That is to say, the handle(s) should be turned counterclockwise till it stops.
Here, a homeowner has turned off the 'inlet' and 'outlet' valves before disconnecting the water supply.
http://www.waterheaterinstallation.info/images/water-heater-old-top-crop.jpg
Beware that the top of the heater will be HOT so use caution and think about the consequences of an involuntary flinch. Test first with the back of your hand and please stay clear of the exhaust stack poking up from the middle of the heater.
--Winston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Winston wrote:
(...)

Let me correct myself.
The photo shows control valves for a parallel water heater, not the valves I was indicating. Still, the principal is the same. A restriction in the inlet side of your water heater could cause creation of air bubbles, so any valve(s) providing water to or from the heater must be fully open, to minimize this cavitation.
--Winston
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Hello Jane,
Steam bubbles wouldn't reach your faucet unless your tap water was boiling hot.
Water tanks have anodes to keep them from rusting. Anodes produce bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen. It happens faster with soft water. Some anodes are designed to slow the bubbling.
I'll bet you aren't using as much hot water lately. That gives the gas more time to accumulate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
E Z Peaces wrote:

Excellent diagnosis!
You could probably test this by holding a match under the faucet.
No, wait...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use very little hot water lately. You could be right. Anyway, the plumber is coming next week.
Thanks for the response.
Jane
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
YvonneD wrote:

Maybe it's related to a strange experience I had a couple of years ago. Does your hot water look milky?
My hot water supplies four sinks, a washer, and a shower. One day when I drew some hot water in a glass at the sink in the main bathroom, tiny gas bubbles made it look white. The water slowly cleared as it sat in the glass. I tried it again. Still white. I removed the aerator. Still white. After I drew more than a quart, it still wasn't clear. It was clear the next day and ever since.
I wonder if the white appearance came from tiny bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen that had been dissolved in the water until I reduced pressure by opening the tap. I don't know why the water with the dissolved gases would have collected in the pipe to that tap.
If more gas had accumulated in the water, perhaps it would have sputtered from the tap. I wonder why the water was cloudy that day but not before or since. Could something unusual in the town water that day have increased gassing in my water heater anode?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

YES! I have noticed in the last couple of weeks that the hot water is cloudy. Exactly as you described yours. Did you have air in the pipes at that time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
YvonneD wrote:

The bubbles were so tiny that the only sign was a milky white color that cleared up as the water sat. I don't know why it happened only once that I noticed or why I didn't notice milky water in the kitchen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Remember that water has some air dissolved in it. How much can be dissolved depends on the temperature and pressure of the water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.