What cable to use...

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this)@optonline.net> wrote:

And feeders from the main panel to subpanels don't qualify? As described in the Code, it seems that they would.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Correct, only the main feeder(s) to the panelboard(s) qualify. If he has multiple service disconnects, and one of them fed the garage panel, it would qualify, but not if his garage feeder came off of a breaker from a panel which was on the load side of a service disconnect
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wrote:

Gotcha. "Load side of the service disconnect" seems to be the crucial part.
Thanks for the clarification.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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RBM wrote:

The section in question covers only dwelling units. A detached garage is not a dwelling unit. Residential outbuildings of any description that are not in fact dwelling units must be supplied with conductors sized in accordance to table 310.16.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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Doug Miller wrote:

No such feeders to panels that supply only a fractional portion of the dwelling units load do not qualify. The use of the plural in the code language is intended to cover feeders to multiple dwelling units within a single structure. Each feeder must be the main feeder for the entire dwelling unit in question. The reduced conductor sizes are predicated on the diversity of loading that is inherent in the way an entire dwelling uses power. When only parts of the load are carried by a sub feeder that diversity is no longer assured.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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60A in the garage would be more than enough in my opinion. We ran a detached for 30+ years with a 10-3 underground 200 feet away. 200A welder, air compressor, overhead heater, fluorescent lights, bench grinder, etc. Never once did we trip the 30 in the main house, nor did we experience the lights in the garage dimming. Your mileage may vary.
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