What BULB do you guys use for taking pictures of automotive DIYs?

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:Try some outdoor floods. Mioght be a bit hardier. Plus :a flood may :work without quiote so high a wattage. I've seen some very high wattage CFLs used by some of my clients, they are almost 1' long and, like, 85 W. I don't know if you can get them in the USA. They are not very expensive, I think like 40 euros, but if you break one that's money down the drain. There are also excellent CFL spotlights, too (at least on this side of the pond).
--
Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
major in electrical engineering
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The big powerful CFLs you mention are possibly those made by Megaman. In the domestic medium size ES fitting they only go up to 60W, a tungsten light equivalent output of 300W with a better colour temperature. In GES fitting they go much larger, although all but the smallest 80W need separate ballast units included in the power supply. But they take a while to warm up and produce full power output.
Mains powered tungsten halogens, if you can still find them in domestic ES fittings, are robust, long lasting, more powerful light output per watt than ordinary tungsten, a higher colour temperature, and possibly the nicest flattest colour power spectrum of any electric source except xenon.
--
Chris Malcolm
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On Mon, 2 Aug 2010 19:54:53 -0600, WW wrote:

Are they rugged?
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YES ... WW
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Try <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> in cheap 10" flood reflectors from Lowes, etc.
They are 6500K so you will get accurate color rendition. I use them for artistic photography and they work well.
--
Work is the curse of the drinking class.

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On Tue, 3 Aug 2010 01:16:24 -0400, BobS wrote:

It DOES get pretty hot. Too hot to touch most of the time. But the light is good. While it lasts.
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Not quite an answer to your question, but I learned a technique for photographing engines and complex three-dimensional objects called light painting. You set the camera on a time exposure of about 4 seconds (a dark garage and a tripod or magnetic clamp are a must) and then use a powerful light and move it all around the area to be imaged.
I used to use tungsten bulbs, but I found that 100 LED showerhead flashlights are perfect for this work as the ones I have are almost the same color temp as daylight and emit broad, shadow free light for over an hour per charge with no cords. They clip into the same sort of clamps used in tungsten light reflectors, too.
You'll see an improvement right away. The dark shadows thrown by hoses, levers, rods and wires disappear because they are "filled in" as you move the light source around the area of interest. .
The 100 LED flashlights are also invaluable in microphotography - they are like miniature umbrella lights. They also run very cool compared to any incandescent light source.
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue, 3 Aug 2010 07:20:36 -0400, Robert Green wrote:

That's a GREAT idea!
The problem with photographing automotive repairs is that the shadows are horrid. I must try that.
Thanks for all the sturdy bulb ideas; I'll keep reading!
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["Followup-To:" header set to alt.home.repair.]

Wow! What a great idea. Is 4 secs long enough to get that light moved to all the places needed. What's the max exposure time?
Thanks for the great tip.
nb
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I used 4 secs because that was the slowest shutter speed on my camera. I got to be pretty quick with the lights. Another advantage of a timed exposure is that you can stop down the lens to get more depth of field. My best advice is to experiment and determine your own times. You can use a neutral density or a polarizing filter to let you use longer shutter speeds if you find you can't do enought light painting in 4 secs.
You'll be amazed at how it eliminates the shadows that plague normal engine compartment photography. I switched to the 100 LED flashlights because they allowed me to illuminate areas of interest slightly more than the rest of the photo. It's like "in-camera" dodging and burning without the enlarger or darkroom!
-- Bobby G.
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notbob wrote:

As long as your camera allows, really as long as you get the exposure right. You need to experiment a bit to get the shutter speed, aperture and lighting right.
Here's one of my cat with a 10 second exposure:
http://www.ollieclark.com/shutterstock/ginger_cat_small.jpeg
This was done with a pretty poor handheld torch. I think you'd get much better results with a better light source. And cats aren't really the best subjects for "light painting" because they move...
Cheers,
Ollie
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wrote:

Why not use a remote flashgun or two? Much more portable, much more light, only downside is you'd have to do a bit of learning if you haven't used that kind of thing before. It can also be cheap if you buy cheap Hong Kong radio flash triggers and second hand film-era flashguns, but you have to use those in fully manual flash and camera modes which involves some more learning.
--
Chris Malcolm
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On 2010-08-02 14:24:49 -0700, Brent

Check the Flashpoint Cool Light 4 system.
< (Amazon.com product link shortened)

If you need a stand Adorama has both; < http://www.adorama.com/FPCL4K.html
Using this lighting you will probably have to make some white balance adjustments if you are shooting jpeg only. Shooting RAW will give you greater flexibility with WB.
--
Regards,

Savageduck
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If "color balance" isn't high on your priority list, you might want to consider using compact flouescent bulbs. Use the type that has a plactic (not glass) glove over the flouescent tube. You can also use CF with a built in reflector.
This are pretty expensive compared to incadescent lamps but will last a LONG time, don't break easily, and don't generate much heat. You don't have to worry about burning yourself either.

You can get SUPER CFs that put out a fair amount of light. Again, some of these have a plastic shell on the outside.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember Brent

You can get cheap (<20$) 12Volt 55W HID headlamp bulbs on ebay that pump out 3500 lumens at colour temps from 4500 to 9000K. All you need to do is procure a spotlight unit from the same source and mount it. Feed it from a suitable 12V PSU and Bob's yer Uncle.
The same HID setup in studio lighting will normally cost hundreds for a single lamp.
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Tulip bulb.
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ktos wrote:

Raw bulbs only useful for b/w pics.
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