What brand of CFL's is the best?

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I just had the third one of the CFL's (compact flourescent lights) go bad within about a year... Wondering if one brand of CFL bulbs are better than others?? The old incandescent bulbs last way longer it seems... Steve
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I have about 50 HD brand bulbs working 2 years with 2 failurers. Enclosed fixturs can overheat them. HD has 7 yr warranty
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Welcome to my world. I bought into the be-green-use-CFL hype, and ended up spending a lot of money on CFL bulbs that for the most part don't last a year. Yes, they have warranties. I don't bother with them though - it's not worth the trouble and I don't want another crap bulb that will burn out in 10 months.
Like you, I'd like to know what brand of bulbs actually last the 5-10 years they are supposed to last.

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Zootal wrote:

A few years ago I got some CFLs that started to fail. Each time one failed I called and they sent a new one. Got about 5 new bulbs. Now they do seem to last much longer.
Lou
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Odd, I've had a regular indoor CFL (because that's what I had handy) in my front porch for over a year and it's still going. I expected it to fail but it hasn't yet. I think I have only replaced one CFL, ever (installed at bottom of basement steps; might have been bumped by moving stuff around)
nate

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I have one in my front porch that has been there for 3 years. However, I don't turn my porch light on very often, so that probably isn't a good test of longevity. I used to use them in my bathroom, but got tired of them burning out. Same for dining room and kitchen. It doesn't seem to matter where/how they are used.
I have a lot that is supposed to be for high temp locations. So far they seem to be doing well, but it was a one-time purchase at HD, and I'll probalby never see the brand again.

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On Fri, 13 Mar 2009 13:29:22 -0700, in alt.home.repair, "Zootal" <zootal.nospam.zootal.nospam.com> wrote:>I have one in my front porch that has been there for 3 years. However, I

When I bought my house seven years ago, I bought a bunch of the cheapest CFLs that Lowe's offered (Sylvania brand, 13 watt). I installed them almost everywhere. Some didn't last long, but most did. The ones that failed did so within the first year. The rest are still installed, working and being used more or less every day.
Where I used them is places where they are turned on and left on for hours at a time. I didn't put CFLs where lighting is needed infrequently and/or only for short periods each day (closets, bathrooms, most exterior locations). I don't know if that's a false economy. And there were places where standard fluorescent lighting was the right choice (kitchen, garage).
One CFL I wouldn't waste my money on again is a 3-way CFL. Its three levels are "dim", "slightly less dim", and "no brighter than the last level". Maybe that particular technology has improved since then, though.
I put CFLs in two ceiling fans, and I've been pleasantly surprised at how well they tolerate that environment.
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 00:33:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@xmission.com (Scott) wrote:

I second the recommendation for Sylvania, and I also have had very good results with Phillips (I've got one that's going on 7 years of service now, and several others surpassing 5 years). Also agree on assigning CFLs to locations where the bulbs will remain on for extended periods of time, not on and off like in closets or bathrooms.
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I broke open the base of a failed CFL. There were over a dozen electronic components packed in there.
I'm guessing that many of the premature failures occur because the lamp enclosure isn't vented enough. and is running too hot. The heat must be hell on the components in a CFL.
They don't have to worry about this in incandescant encloures.
It would be interesting to measure the temp near the base after the lamp's been on a while.
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The ones that have gone bad for me have just been in a socket out in the open in my basement. They don't seem to actually burn out but the electronics in them must go bad because all of my bad ones will eventually light up if I leave the switch on for a long time (up to an hour). I have a couple locations where the lights are on and off frequently but they are some of the longest lasting CFL's that I have. Go figure.
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Most of mine appear to be some sort of bulb burnout/damage. The base of the bulb itself is usually discolored. I'm guessing, of course, I don't know if that was why it failed. A few also show signs of getting hot - discolored bases, mostly, even though they are in a well ventilated location. I suspect that the electronics aren't ventilated properly and can't take the heat, and the manufactures haven't all figured that out yet (or don't care).
Remember back in the late 1970s and 1980s when car makers were playing with electronic ignition and electronic engine control? At first they put the control box under the hood. What idiot figured that you can take electronic components and put them in a place that gets up to 150 degrees or more? Needless to say, they went bad right and left. Then some genious (wasn't VW the first, followed by the Japanese?) figured that if you put the control box in the passenger compartment, it won't get too hot, and now they last 20+ years instead of 2 or 3.
Eventually the makers of CFLs will figure out that, duh, you have to keep the electronics from getting too hot...
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Hopefully you will recycle them correctly. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7431198
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Not me. They quit working, they go in the trash.
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HeyBub wrote:

Dittos. Along with used motor oil ;)
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Not the HD brand thats for sure. I spent big bucks to replace 9 ceiling can PAR floods (6 inch cans) with dimmable CFL's (100 watt equiv light output). I have some old halogen ones in some other cans that are used just as frequently. Well, all 9 of the dimmable CFL floods bulbs stopped working after about 4 to 6 months. The halogen PAR floods in the other cans have been going for about 5 years with only one replacement. Both circuits use the same brand high-wattage dimmer switches.
I think the new dimmable CFL's are something you definitely want to stay away from. Since my town now charges extra for people to recycle (no profit in recycling anymore I guess), my CFL's will be in a landfill somewhere.
The best use for CFL's I experienced to date is in outdoor lighting, they do last much longer in severe conditions like that, and I hate changing the outdoor bulbs (mud, ladders, dropping the thumbscrews, etc.)
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The newer bulbs tend to last longer. The published life is based on a minimum 4 hour burn time. The more you turn them on and off, the quicker they'll burn out. But before everybody freaks out, you should know that even if a bulb burns out 75% faster than advertised and you don't recycle them properly, you STILL prevent more mecury from getting into the environment--AND, you'll save enough money on electricity charges to buy another CFL and still have change left over. The electricity to burn a standard incandescent bulb (from a coal fired plant) pollutes almost twice as much.
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Lots of facts. Can you provide a source?
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Best for what? The ones with no mercury content are used by responsible people.
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When the country goes to coal-powered cars this will all be negated (plug in hybrids are essentially coal-powered cars)
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Shhhhh.
All those Prius owners are making the world a better place.
All the pollution required to make the batteries and recycling/ landfill issues don't count.
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