What batteries to use?

Page 2 of 2  

Bob G. <rg327_remove_comcast.net> writes:

That's only true of badly-designed electronics. Alkalines are 1.5 V when new, but drop to 1.0 V or lower at the end of their life, depending on load. Any well-designed electronic device intended to operate from alkalines ought to operate down to 1.0 volts per cell, or at least 1.1 V per cell. Any device that doesn't operate at this voltage is leaving a substantial amount of energy in the batteries when it shuts down or begins to malfunction.
Rechargeable NiCd and NiMH cells drop quickly to 1.2 V per cell, and then *remain at that voltage* until they are almost completely discharged. Since this is above the cutoff voltage that should have been designed in for alkalines, rechargeables work fine in almost well-designed electronics. In the case of 8 cells in series, alkalines supply 8-12 V, so the electronics ought to work properly on 8 V, and the 9.6 V supplied by rechargeables is well above this limit.
(There are sometimes problems with rechargeables working too well - their lower internal resistance means they can deliver several times as much current into a low-resistance load as an alkaline cell of the same size. Some electronics built assuming the alkaline cell's internal resistance is part of the circuit can be overloaded and burned out when rechargeables are used instead (e.g. certain cheap electronic flashes from 30 years ago). And battery packs with NiCd or NiMH cells need a fuse or circuit breaker if there's any chance of the terminals being shorted, while an akaline pack does not.)
    Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have some fun, put some nonrechargables in a battery charger and see what happens... Great family fun..!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/1/2008 5:53 PM snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net spake thus:

I assume you're referring to that oft-repeated claim that you must Never Ever Put Non-Rechargeable Batteries In A Charger, printed on all batteries and chargers. Or else they'll explode and destroy your house and kill all its occupants.
Not true. I'm here to tell you that I've been recharging non-rechargeables (alkalines, mostly) in my chargers for decades now. The worst that happens is that a cell will leak; this isn't the end of the world, and my charger still works even though that's happened to it several times.
I'm not recommending this, as it only gives a weak charge at best, but it will often restore a marginal cell to working capacity for at least a little while.
The AAAs in my remote are Duracell alkalines that I've recharged several times, and they're still working great. I'm guessing this is because the remote draws so little current that it doesn't take much juice to satisfy it.
--
Washing one\'s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the
powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) wrote in

I've seen TEK 200 series o'scopes that had NiCD packs with NO fuse protection,where something shorted and melted the circuit board and caught fire,melting right thru the plastic case. A mod was generated to install fuses in each battery pack....DUH!!!
But alkalines can deliver a hefty short-circuit current,too.
rechargeables are for frequent-use items(due to self-discharge rates),and alkalines for intermittent-use items.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not any more. Revised NIMH technology puts a premium on low self discharge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends. While they're great for low consumption devices like remote controls or bluetooth peripherals, I wouldn't trust low discharge NIMH batteries for very infrequently used items like emergency flashlights.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Off the topic of labellers, the old CB walkie talkies used to have a dummy cell which replaced 2 AA cells. If you used rechargables, you use 10 batteries. For alkalines, you use 8 batteries, and a dummy insert.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As far as i now, you should not let batteries stay in your gadgets especially if you know that you won't be using them for a long time. :wink: Posted from the Free Home Improvement Forum at http://www.spicyhome.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You have a point here Choi88 and Im definitely agreed with you. Posted from the Free Home Improvement Forum at http://www.spicyhome.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would suggest not leaving batteries in them. Keep a supply of alkaline batteries of the sizes you need and then just put them in the devices when they are being used. The slight inconvenience will be small compared to the cost of dead batteries and the possible damage due to leakage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No. Rechargeables are not a good idea for infrequently used items. Rechargeables have a shorter shelf life than non-rechargeable batteries. Rechargeables are good for cameras, r/c equipment, etc, anything with frequent use, but they don't 'outlive' regular batteries. For example, you should never use rechargeables in home fire detectors. They just don't have as long a shelf life before they begin to loose their charge.
snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Alkaline is the better choice. Posted from the Free Home Improvement Forum at http://www.spicyhome.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.