What batteries to use?

Page 1 of 2  

Hi,
What are the most economical batteries to use in devices that are rarely used, such as a label maker (e.g. 15 labels a year). I've gathered over the years that in items like flashlights it pays to use better brands, but what about the situation above? Are rechargables a good idea for that?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Given the higher cost of rechargables and their self-discharge rate over time, I would say that common throw-away alkaline batteries would be most cost-effective in devices that are very rarely used, and they will stay fresh for several years of non-use. If the device tends to sit unused for months at a time, I would just use disposable batteries but would not keep them in the device in case they leak during storage.
Rechargables are a better idea for devices where you have to replace the batteries often.
--
Travis Evans
[Obtain email address by removing all Q\'s.]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on the entire situation. If you have rechargables and can use them in different units at different times they can be worth the up front cost. Otherwise agree with you on the alkalines
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You have a point here. I often use rechargeables in my TV/VCR remotes even though alkalines would probably theoretically be a better choice, simply because I have lots of rechargeables and usually very few alkalines, if any, on hand.
--
Travis Evans
[Obtain email address by removing all Q\'s.]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Aaron Fude wrote:

Rechargables are generally a bad choice for seldom-used items, since Murpy's law applies- when you want to use it, the charge will have leaked down. And if you keep it on a charger all the time without using it, the batteries die young, not to mention you waste juice.
Life is too short, etc. Buy Duracells or similar name brand, but don't keep them in the device unless you use it at least weekly or so. (Most devices have a small draw even when off, and even brand names sometimes leak when fully flat.) I keep an assortment in the junk drawer, and add it to the grocery list when the blister packs only have a couple left. Much cheaper in bulk packs, especially if you cut the coupon from the Sunday paper- they are in there at least once a month. I have maybe a dozen battery devices in semi-regular use, and spend maybe 30 bucks a year on batteries. Don't keep too big a shelf stock, though- in my experience those 'good until' dates on the batteries are rather optimistic.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my own experience,Duracells LEAK far more often than Everready or Fuji Novel.(even when -still powering- the unit.)
I will not buy Duracells any more.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

This is my experience also. Duracell batteries cause too much damage and are not dependable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can only think of one time in the past 10+ years that I've had a battery leak and it was not a Duracell. We use mostly Duracell at work and never had a leak. I rate them as rather dependable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
About a year ago, I bought several Duracell NiMH rechargable cells. Use in my digital camera, and Mini Mag flash light. I've been very pleased with them. The folks at the local walmart say that Energizer brand work better. Faster flash charge time. I may buy some to try out.
And with your field report about Duracell primary use alkalines. Maybe that company has some quality control problems. I found the generic NiMH cells I got off Ebay were poor. And a couple of them didn't hold a charge very well at all, even when freshly charged.
For the original poster's label maker, I also suggest alkalines. I've used a lot of Thunderbolt Magnum cells from Harbor Freight, and they have been consistently good to me. The black and gold "Infinity beyond" cells from ebay, the AAA cells had a lot of leakers. The AA cells have all been fine, in Infinity Beyond brand. I got a good price, and then promptly found that the AAA cells had a lot of leakers. About one in ten.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Duracell leakage I experienced was with alkalines.

I bought one box of AAA alkaline's from HF,and even the unused,stored ones began leaking.
I prefer Fuji Novel alkalines,as the price is lower than brand name cells. (from Big Lots stores)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Duracell leakage I experienced was with alkalines.
SM: Yes, you did write that.

I bought one box of AAA alkaline's from HF,and even the unused,stored ones began leaking.
SM: Oops! Thanks for the head up. I was going to buy some AAA cells at HF later today.
I prefer Fuji Novel alkalines,as the price is lower than brand name cells. (from Big Lots stores)
SM: Friend of mine likes Dollar General. I may try them. He says their AA cells are five bucks for 24 cells, which is a very good price.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:

I totally agree with Jim on DuraCells....I had them destroy a couple of Maglights that were in cars.
I wrote ot Duracell about the problem with D cells failing & leaking in Maglights; I hypothesised some sort of incompatibilyt iwth the flashlights?
I've had Duracells leak in about four Maglights over the last 15 years.
This last time I got new Maglights (again) & battery vouchers.....kept the flashlights, gave the vouchers away.
I switched to Eveready when I had two flashlight in the same vehicle; one with Duracells, the other Eveready.
Durcells leaked, Eveready did not leak.
AF-
If you have lots of battery usage & only a few sizes...rechargeables can be cheaper but as my battery usage fell off (no more kids' toys) I switched back to large package purchases of Eveready alkaline (AA & D), on sale if possible
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I buy my batteries at costco -- and use their own brand.
Seem fine to me.
Never leaked so far.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/28/2008 5:59 PM Aaron Fude spake thus:

Read through the articles on this site: http://www.batteryuniversity.com/index.htm
I think I got this from someone in this group not long ago. Lots of good info about how batteries work, differences between different types, and which ones are good for which applications.
--
Washing one\'s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the
powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 17:59:29 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

I seem to have lots of stuff that uses batteries and I have found the Costco (Kirkland) batteries are as good as any name brand. On the other hand the ones I got from Bass Pro Shop were junk and I was surprised by that. They wouldn't even work in my digital camera.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Discount alkalines like Panasonic, Toshiba, Thunderbolt Magnum. Should do just fine. Ray O Vac are also very good.
I would not use rechargable cells, as they go flat on thier own, and you'd waste more time charging them before each use.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Like you, I have a label maker that is seldom used.
I just bought the plug in adapter and quit worrying about the batteries. Try Amazon.
Hi,
What are the most economical batteries to use in devices that are rarely used, such as a label maker (e.g. 15 labels a year). I've gathered over the years that in items like flashlights it pays to use better brands, but what about the situation above? Are rechargables a good idea for that?
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 17:59:29 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

The new rechargeables that keep their charge like regular alkalines (long shelf life, unlike ordinary rechargeables), would be a good idea. Hybrio is one brand, there are several now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 23:44:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Sorry that I am comming into this thread so late....BUT I am a Backyard astronomer who uses a Goto computerized Scope that can be powered by AA Batteries...
According to those in the know (not me) RECHARGABLES just do not work...
The claim is that 8 rechargable AA's only put out a total of 9.6 v not when freshly charge not the 12 V that the regular AA's put out... so while the rechargables will work for 10 minutes when the voltage even drops a hair all hell breaks loose because the scope dances all over the sky ... instead of slewing to Jupiter or some specific target...
Not that it makes any difference because everyone runs off a 12 V Gel cell battery or regulated power supply anyway... BUT is it really true that a rechargable AA does not puty out a full 1.5 V when freshly charged...
Bob G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

According to those who know the rechargeable low self discharge NIMH batteries that are usually termed hybrid will work in most applications.
The exception is your example above. In that case and some others the electronics were designed for 1.5 volt alkaline's and the circuit will deliberately shut down or malfunction if it doesn't see the expected voltage.
Most circuits are not designed to be so voltage sensitive. The NIMH AA's have plenty of power down to about 1.15 volts per cell. Most simple battery operated devices will work at this voltage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.