What are the REAL differences between the 6, 9 &12 year models of hot water heaters ?

I am facing the purchase of a new hot water heater. They are sold with either 6, 9 or 12 year warranties.
I'm trying to decide what is the best one to buy to maximize the return on the purchase price.
We estimate to be in this house for another 5+ years before moving. The prime reason for moving would be if the kids need access to better schools 5 years from now.
Granted that the prices are about $250, $350 and $400 for the 3 models under consideration. The differential is money that could be used elsewhere.
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If the water is hot you dont need a heater What is a hot water heater
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wrote:

Piss off you stupid wanker... And don't come back till you learn to be funny
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This explains the differences they tend to be subtle like more insulation or heavier anode
http://www.geappliances.com/smartwater/heaters/features_main.htm
Wayne
wrote:

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wrote:

That is the ONLY difference, the length of the warranty. They take the in-store peddling of the "extended warranty" (which most salespeople don't really push unless they are on 100% commission) and wrapped it up into a few convenient pre-included prices. The manufacturers are not dummies, they know how long their product lasts from historical data, and they develop a projection on how many will fail in under 6 years, between 6 and 9 years, etc. Pick your comfort level and pay the price.
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So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
have some sympathy, and some taste.
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What is the argument FOR spending anything more than the minimum?
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wrote:

on
under
I second that. If the water is already hot you should be able maintain the temperature with the cheapest available heater.
Bill
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wrote:

In theory a better quality heater that wil last longer, therefore costing you less annually ?
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snipped-for-privacy@isd.net wrote:

At that cost you must be talking about gas. The higher priced one is probably a higher efficiency model, which you may or may not recover the money in 5 years. If you are talking about an electric water heater, then get the cheap one, it is likely to last nearly as long as the more expensive one. The most expensive electric water heater (assuming they are all the same size) probably has a bit more insulation and may have stainless steel heater rods, and may have a large anode. It would cast you about $60-100 to upgrade from the cheap model to the expensive one.
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says...

Take a look at http://www.waterheaterrescue.com /
It's a great site with plenty of info about water heaters. The main difference between the models is likely to be the size of anode.

If you're only going to be there for 5 years, why bother getting anything but the 6-year water heater? Save the money - chances are a buyer isn't going to worry too much about the lifespan of the water heater when they consider buying your house.
Regards,
George Wenzel
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George Wenzel, B.A. (Criminology)
E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@recursor.invalid
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Why would you want to heat hot water? Are you nuts?
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