What are the chances of patching a textured ceiling?


I have an 8" circle that was cut into the kitchen ceiling (was a vent?) I would like to patch that area and then paint the whole ceiling. The ceiling has a texture to it with swirls that look like they were done with a hand trowel?? (nothing like my parents house that had perfect swirls that repeated over the whole ceiling) This is more of a pebbled surface with a light random swirl pattern.
I'm hoping I can patch the hole and then use spackle to try and match the pattern. or would another material give me a better chance to match??
Thanks for any help..
Steve
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Maybe use a leftover piece of wallboard to experiment with different types/thicknesses of texture,samples that do'nt match can be scraped and retried,allow only the best candidates to dry then apply the best process to the patch. I never liked matching swirl texture because I've never done a whole house or even a room and it is'nt a skill I have..The successful matches were a fine sand and done with a cement trowel years ago..
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wrote:

Go here:
www.drywallschool.com
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Costs 10$ to see the most simple of procedures (such as a knockdown texture). I don't think so!
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comcastss news groups wrote:

My textured ceiling was swirled on with a 6" wallpaper pasting brush by the plasterer when my house was built. Does yours look like it could have been applied the same way? The swirls were applied with plaster (joint compound) right from the hawk. My wife actually duplicated the swirls on a bathroom ceiling, so it can be done by a non-professional with a little talent.
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It can be done but is something of an art.
I would try and experiment on a piece of scrap sheetrock or even an old cardboard box. If it looks okay, go for it.
Otherwise, I might be inclined to find a pro. Many could do an excellent job in a few minutes. If there's any remodelling or new construction going on nearby, you might find someone willing to do this on the side for a few bucks.
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Andy comments After you try the advice given here, if it doesn't match to your satisfaction ( and there's a fair chance that it won't) , consider this as Plan B.....
Buy a vent grill for a buck or two from Home Depot, the kind that would be used over an inlet/outlet to a heating/cooling system, and put it over the bad spot.... It will appear to be just another vent for your air condx, and will cover a myriad of sloppy texturing......
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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This is what I have now. I'm looking to get rid of the grill..
Steve
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I bought some patching stuff that came in a tube from either home Depot or lowes. It had a sponge applicator at one end that you pushed to apply the stuff. Worked well but we did not have a twirl but I was thinking after applying it you could hit it with a brush. We got a perfect match without repainting.
I thought it was made by DAP but it might have been this stuff:
http://www.homaxproducts.com/products/texture/13/index.html

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