What are my options for fixing this chewed up drip irrigation setup?

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On 6/27/2013 7:26 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Those leaks look like where 1/4" tubing might have been connected at one time and broke off. If it were "me", I'd just cut out the bad section and insert a repair pc... I'm lazy.. I don't want to replace the entire thing if I don't have to. If the hole is a circle, you might could just plug it with hole plugs you can buy, too.
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:08:14 -0500, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

OK. That's what I'll do. I've never really worked with this type of tubing before. I will try to tape the ends together, but, I have about 80psi water pressure, so electrical tape might not hold.
Seems to me the simplest repair is to cut out the bad spots and insert a piece of pipe nipple of the right size & a splotch of the right glue.
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On 6/27/2013 9:41 PM, Danny D. wrote:

I haven't tried it exactly like that before. What I did was buy the plastic straight connectors and use those.
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/8c/8c59c2fb-b334-4a80-8f41-87c7df86c498_300.jpg
Here is a page of different ones: http://www.homedepot.com/Outdoors-Garden-Center-Watering-Irrigation-Drip-Irrigation-Drip-Irrigation-Fittings/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbx4u/h_d2/Navigation?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053&searchNav=true
There are straight ones, T and L fittings, too, for the different size tubing.
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 22:13:41 -0500, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

Thanks for that pointer. I'll head on over to Home Depot and pick up a few as I think all I need to do is repair this one major leak, plus tie the tubing to the sprinkler, and, then, it should work.
I'll let you know how it goes - but it's too dark to do anything tonight. (Had to work on the pool for hours - but that's another story altogether.)
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Danny D. wrote:

<smile> buy extras! you'll eventually need them along with various fittings that you don't really need now. I always buy extras so I won't have to go back. Problem is, I never seen to buy the ones I actually NEED later on! LOL

Once upon a time we had a 27 foot above ground round pool. They do make for interesting stories. I wish we still had it because it's been so hot here.
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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 07:37:21 -0700, Oren wrote:

Some are round holes, and others are cracks, yet others have multiple puncture wounds, so, I'd say the line has been abused by rakes, high water pressure (80psi) and animals.
One thing I noticed in the videos was that many people put a 30 psi or even lower pressure regulator on their drip tubes.
Since my well system puts out 80psi, I should probably invest in one of those - do you think?
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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 13:56:58 -0700, Oren wrote:

Nope. There are two systems, separated by a huge backflow preventer valve which pops up out of the ground in a reverse-U shape.
The first branch of well water feeds the irrigation and fire suppression system; and then the second branch feeds the house.
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 14:46:44 -0700, Oren wrote:

I had done that, a while ago, and this is what had resulted:

But, by digging perpendicular to the bushes, I was able to uncover two lines, one big and one small, which only had one open chewed up end. So I put a garden hose connection on them:

It's a LOT of work to replace them, so, I am beginning to think I will connect the bigger one to the irrigation valve which seems to be feeding the missing end:

For that, I'll need to patch a few holes in the existing tube already connected to the irrigation line:

So, how does this sound for the 'easiest' plan of action:
a) Take the existing 3/4" tubing which is already tied to the sprinkler system and connect it to the 3/4" tubing that is under the oleander canopy.
b) One by one, patch the leaks, starting at the first, and moving onward as they show themselves.
c) Then, figure out why there is a 1/2" tubing, which must have connected somehow to the irrigation system; but I don't know how yet.
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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 13:26:43 -0700, Oren wrote:

Well, I don't really know.
All I know, working backward, is that for "most" of the 300 foot run, there is a 1/2" and a 5/8" poly pipe feeding the oleander:

Every once in a while, you can see them both on the surface:

As those two poly tubes get within 30 or 40 feet of the irrigation valves, they suddenly pop up out of ground (I had put the garden hose connections on):

I didn't dig up the irrigation valve, so, I have no idea how it's hooked up, but, the 5/8" poly tubing which was broken at this point, appears to continue along the oleander until it gets near the irrigation valve. A foot away from the valve, it dives down, presumably to the valve (which works, and sends water through the broken tubing):

Note: I dug around for a half hour looking for where the 1/2" poly tubing connects to the irrigation system - and finally gave up on that endeavor. Also, I can't tell if there is a pressure regulator on the valve itself, as it might be buried, for all I know.
I guess I should pick up a pressure tester for garden equipment, to be sure.
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 13:08:03 -0500, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

That is an option.
Something, I don't know what, seems to me that I'd prefer the permanence of the PVC shutoff and *then* the less-permanent stuff, such as a garden-hose thread which is then attached to the rather flimsy tubing.
But thanks for the idea as I hadn't thought of the shut-off valve, which is just what I need.
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On 6/26/2013 6:04 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Sounds like a plan! One thing I probably should mention is those glued pvc sections come apart after being exposed to the weather elements day after day. You might think it is fine and you have the water pressure on the pipe, but the valve is shut off and come home from running errand with the pipes blown apart. We've had to re-glue every section of pvc pipe that we've ran throughout the yard so we could get a main water line to the back yard garden and set up the drip irrigation.
Got a call from my neighbor today that one of those sections had come apart and was producing a geyser in our back yard. He was kind enough to turn off the water from the source vs me rushing home to turn it off myself.
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:31:16 -0500, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

Hmmm... they're not supposed to.
On a.h.r, we researched what destroys the PVS, and if you paint them, the UV light doesn't bother them, and there's not much else that will.
Of course, earthquakes and trucks driving on the lawn would break them - as do lawn mowers and weed whackers, but they are supposed to last longer that we will.
Still, it's a good idea to paint them. Here's a shot of my recently repaired pool equipment, for example, where I haven't painted the new sections I put on last month to fix the leaks.

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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 04:15:16 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

More information on PVC which is supposed to last 100 years...
UniBell FAQ on Studies of PVC Pipe Performance Over Time: http://www.plasticengineeredproducts.com/manufacturers/unibell/faq.htm
The Effects of Sunlight Exposure on PVC Pipe: http://www.nacopvc.com/c/technical-info--forms/the-effects-of-sunlight-exposure-on-pvc-pipe
Painting of PVC Piping for Ultraviolet Protection: http://www.lascofittings.com/supportcenter/PaintingPVCPiping.asp
How to Use Acrylic or Latex Paint on PVC: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/use-acrylic-latex-paint-pvc-25511.html
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Danny D. wrote:

hmmm paint the pvc pipe where it's connected or all of it? I've never heard of that before.
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 15:18:37 -0700, Oren wrote:

As Oren said, any and all white PVC that is sticking out of ground is typically painted (usually black, but only because it absorbs heat and is a cheap paint). For example, here is my pool equipment; only the newly repaired pipe is not yet painted black:

As Oren said, you're supposed to use acrylic (or latex) based paints; but, in my case, I couldn't find any in the house, and, when I asked pool guys, they said the petroleum is only there while it's wet, and that they use whatever is on the truck, so, *maybe* it doesn't really matter:

Note: For a larger size picture, substitute "img" for "640".
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 14:29:10 -0700, Oren wrote:

It's amazing how the glue lubricates it so that the pipe fits on perfectly, and, yet it wants to pop back out - so I agree with holding it for a quarter minute or so.

Yeah, but we need *that* stuff for fixing holes with just two couplings and a center-pipe!
Or ... you use it in the four 90s method (which seems like overkill):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdYTg3oDKfU

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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 10:56:30 -0700, Oren wrote:

I was afraid of that. Thanks for the warning.
I'll try this procedure:
a. I'll try to pull the green part out of the 3/4" PVC pipe b. If that fails, I'll cut the elbow off and replumb with a new PVC coupling, elbow, & valve c. Then I'll add the pipe-to-hose thread so it can be disconnected when not in use (like when it's my compost heap again!)
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 23:09:37 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

You guys were right.
That green stuff is there to stay.

I'll probably cut off the elbow and start fresh, as there's no sense in restricting the water flow from the start.
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To add to David's already comprehensive post, here is another online tutorial about polypipe irrigation; http://www.irrigationdirect.com/tutorial/irrigation/view/drip-irrigation-basics-and-installation/expert-advice/id/12 ?
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On 6/25/2013 1:55 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Was it chewed up by critters or just been shredded by rough treatment and exposure to the elements? o_O
TDD
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