What am I doing so wrong in this kitchen sink strainer removal process?

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Why not add a garbage disposal while you are under there?
My recommendation would be the InSinkErator Evolution Essential. Very quiet, very powerful.
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 12:36:03 +0000, DerbyDad03 wrote:

There is already a 1/2 HP disposal in the same cabinet:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3787/13522833255_80f61971c8_b.jpg
I made a whole bunch of mistakes, but here is the final setup:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7204/13522834335_cc2e023c3e_b.jpg
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2014 23:18:43 -0700, Bob F wrote:

I peeled it apart and banged it out.
One mistake I made though, was not purchasing a WIDE flange basket.
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3824/13523336733_81c21c4059_c.jpg
Apparently the flange on the new basket is slightly less wide than the original, so, the rust at the edge of the sink is now showing.
My mistake was in not knowing that ahead of time (which my sister pointed out to me).
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2014 22:09:32 -0400, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Thanks for that idea.
The biggest problem I had in assembly was that I couldn't figure out the rather simple instructions for the life of me.
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2874/13523239925_d75394358e_b.jpg
The kit came with *two* different types of nylon bushings:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7077/13523337643_c60dc71f52_b.jpg
One bushing was beveled, and I used that on the horizontal end. But the other bushing was sqaured, and I couldn't figure out how to use that squared bushing.
Nothing whatsoever I tried seemed to make any sense. Googling, I found NOBODY used a square bushing on that end (they used the square bushing only at the plastic-to-metal interface).
So, I gave up on the square bushing, and re-used an old beveled nylon bushing instead:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2850/13523335043_711c116e5b_b.jpg
QUESTION: How was I supposed to use the SQUARE nylon bushing?
NOTE: The instructions show it clearly as #3 but those instructions can't possibly work, as I tried it in that configuration and if fell apart every time.
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2014 20:37:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

I'm not sure what that means.
I made a whole bunch of mistakes, but, at least the result is much *better* than the jury-rigged contraption that was there initially, mostly held together with putty.
Since I had assembled and disassembled the pipes quite a few times trying to figure out how to properly use the squared bushing (before I gave up on it), I found this particular pair of pliers handy:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2934/13523563044_b0b4e2c4e4_b.jpg
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wrote:

Why an old one when a new beveled bushing came with the pipe?

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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 23:24:03 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

The beveled bushing/washer is the pipe to pipe socket slip seal.
The shoulder bushing/washer is the basket to tailpiece/pipe seal. Flat top to basket, small part into tailpiece.

--
Mr.E

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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 23:14:54 -0400, micky wrote:

The package came with the following: - One elbow pipe with only one threaded end - Two plastic nuts - One beveled washer - One squared washer
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2850/13523335043_711c116e5b_b.jpg
I used the beveled washer for the non-threaded end of the pipe. So that left me with only the squared washer.
Looking at the instructions, I'm supposed to use the squared washer. But, nothing I did made any sense.
So, in exasperation (with my sister asking what was taking so long to follow the simple instructions), I just re-used the old beveled washer.
But, I really wish I understood how that squared washer was supposed to work - because I couldn't figure it out!
Googling, I see almost everyone uses TWO beveled washers (one on each end), so, it's confusing to me why the squared washer even exists.
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On Mon, 31 Mar 2014 07:56:47 -0400, Mr.E wrote:

My mistake.
I should have made it clear that the metal sink strainer already came with its own shoulder bushing, so I already used a shoulder bushing at the top of the plastic tailpipe.
The elbow came with another shoulder bushing, and only one beveled bushing.
My dilemma was that I was essentially missing a beveled bushing, but, if I followed the instructions, the entire pipe kept falling apart in my hands.
So, there's something very wrong with this picture.
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2844/13538120684_1584eea3d7_h.jpg
I just don't know how those instructions could possibly have been followed by anyone.
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In hindsight, the funny thing is that my sister kept telling me that the guy who installed the Kenmore filtering system was far faster than I was, when all I was doing was replacing the existing plumbing and he was putting in an entire expensive filtering system in.
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Hey, don't take this personally, but your sister sounds like a PITA - unless she was good naturedly picking on you like family can do.
If she was serious about how long it was taking you to complete the job and complaining that you can't follow simple instructions, I'd tell her to call the Kenmore guy back. Make sure she reminds him to bring his glue.
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On Sun, 30 Mar 2014 01:10:32 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

Lessons learned:
0. Some repair people will *glue* a kitchen basket strainer on, and, if they do, you will have to destroy it in order to remove it.
1. The reason *my* strainer ring was impossible to remove without destroying it was that it was glued on (see above).
2. When buying a repair kit, don't assume all the parts are provided. Specifically, buy an extra beveled washer!
3. Pay attention to the width of the lip of the replacement kitchen strainer; it needs to be equal to or larger in width to the original.
4. Use plumbers putty (instead of glue) to waterproof the kitchen strainer basket; putting an oil on top of the opened container of plumber's putty should help preserve it for future use.
5. If at all possible, get a new sister if she continues to complain about how long it takes you to do the job!
:)
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