wet pipes

Hello
My pipes from my well, and all my cold water pipes have water on them. Nothing is leaking.
I got some of that 3/4" pipe wrap. But now that stuff is "sweating" as well.
The humidity in the house is 60-75%, but the humidity outside is 25-40%
I live in Alaska.
Any ideas?
thanks
Mike
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mike wrote:

Well, that is the answer. The indoor humidity it too high for the temperature of the water in the pipes. 60-75% is rather high for residential areas.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Dehumidifier, more insulation, maybe both. 75% is very high in a house. Ed
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Did you use foam or fiberglass pipe wrap, fiberglass will get wet . Get the foam sleeve that slips over the pipe in 4 ft lengths. Lowering humidity will help.
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I got foam 4" pipe wrap that fit over the pipe.
So how does one decrease the humidity?
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A dehumidifier. We could see the outlines of all the pipes in the basement in water on the floor where the condensation dripped. Put in a dehumidifier and no more problems.
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any inexpensive dehumidifiers that are worth it? I don't want to be penny wise pound foolish.
thanks
Mike
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comremove (CAStinneford) wrote in message wrote:

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On 19 Jul 2004 23:16:28 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (mike) wrote:

Mike, Without getting overly technical, what you are observing is the result of 'dewpoint' being reached. 'Dewpoint' is the finite point at which water vapour in the surrounding medium condenses on the surface of the controlled temperature object (usually pipes, but can be glass or concrete or even a tin roof!- in static environments). Essentially you have two choices: 1. Control the surface temperature of the pipes 2. Eliminate the water vapour.
Insulation of the pipes covers #1. Dehumidification covers #2.
I would offer that a sustainable outcome [in an economic sense] for an environment of sub zero ambient temperatures, #2 is *_not_* a viable option. #1. OTOH is an attractive long term solution. I would offer that efficient insulation of your pipes would cost far less (and work indefinitely) than any "dehumidification" option.
Of course [thinking tangently] you could always consider pumping a 150A 12V DC supply along your pipe network as a real solution,, but the cost???????????????..in the latitude you live at?
*HOW*?????????????/ Today we have wonderful products like polyurethane in handy 'pump-paks' and access to all sorts of disposable clingwrap films and PVC tubing..etc..etc.. IF I could not design a home built system of encasing your pipes and filling the void with a minimum of 60mm(2.5") of foam,, then I would be your monkeys Uncle :- D
Hih's
BTZ
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On 19 Jul 2004 23:16:28 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (mike) wrote:

Mike, Without getting overly technical, what you are observing is the result of 'dewpoint' being reached. 'Dewpoint' is the finite point at which water vapour in the surrounding medium condenses on the surface of the controlled temperature object (usually pipes, but can be glass or concrete or even a tin roof!- in static environments). Essentially you have two choices: 1. Control the surface temperature of the pipes 2. Eliminate the water vapour.
Insulation of the pipes covers #1. Dehumidification covers #2.
I would offer that a sustainable outcome [in an economic sense] for an environment of average sub zero ambient temperatures, #2 is *_not_* a viable option. #1. OTOH is an attractive long term solution. I would offer that efficient insulation of your pipes would cost far less (and work indefinitely) than any "dehumidification" option.
Of course [thinking tangently] you could always consider pumping a 150A 12V DC supply along your pipe network as a real solution,, but the cost???????????????..in the latitude you live at?
*HOW*????????????? Today we have wonderful products like polyurethane in handy 'pump-paks' and access to all sorts of disposable clingwrap films and PVC tubing..etc..etc.. IF I could not design a home built system of encasing your pipes and filling the void with a minimum of 60mm(2.5") of foam,, then I would be your monkeys Uncle :- D
Hih's
BTZ
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On 19 Jul 2004 23:16:28 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (mike) wrote:

Leaving the humidity level where it is is being foolish. Mildew, damp rot, condensation in walls (your pipes do run in walls, remember...) all will contribute to numerous problems in time. The secret is controlling humidity.
Jeff
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mike wrote:

Additional ventilation or a dehumidifier.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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