wet phone

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On 07/15/2015 10:04 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But...but...but what about a rotary dimmer switch? Doesn't it get brighter if I turn the knob? ;-)
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On Thu, 16 Jul 2015 04:19:45 -0500, "R. P. McMurphy"

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On 7/15/2015 11:04 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Does the same person repeatedly push the call button for an elevator that's 7 floors away?
I've seen people repeatedly push the traffic signal button at the cross walk.
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On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 10:21:09 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

g else about the vehicle expect for that. I long for the days of 3 dials an d 1 button: Temp control dial, fan speed dial, mode dial, A/C button. OK, m aybe a Max A/C button too. That's all we really need. There are far too man y variables involved to expect a vehicle to maintain a given temperature au tomatically. There is no such thing as "set it and forget it" and least not in my experience.

I don't know about micky, but I don't fiddle with it for the sake of fiddli ng. I fiddle with it because the vehicle does not maintain (or my body does n't think it maintains) a steady temperature.
I don't fiddle with my house stat, unless I really want it warmer or colder based on what I'm wearing or doing. However, I can be driving my Odyssey o n the highway for hours, doing the same thing (driving) and wearing the sam e clothes, and will need to adjust the temp on occasion to remain comfortab le.
I don't have any long (hours long) trips planned for a few weeks, but I wil l a perform a few local tests. I have a cooking thermometer with a wired pr obe. It reacts to changes in air temp very rapidly. I'll hang it and monito r it to see if I can prove myself right or wrong.
In mid-August I'll be doing a 950 mile double-college-move trip (2 daughter s both moving on the same weekend) that will be a great time to really mon itor the cabin temperature.
We'll see.
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On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 10:21:09 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agree. I don't have problems with the climate control on modern cars. Overall it works very well and there is a lot *less* re-adjusting. And what re-adjusting you do is precise, in small steps, eg change it from 74 to 72, instead of turning a blue/red dial and guessing.
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wrote:

It mixes hot and cold air and either throttles the AC or cycles the compressor, depending on the design of the system.

Doesn't matter - cycling the cliutch or throttling the AC (adjusting the orifice) uses about the same amount of power, and throttling doesn't wear out the compressor clutch
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On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 6:47:08 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

All the cars I'm familiar with do exactly that. They keep the AC going to first cool the air, which removes humidity, then the reheat via the heater core as needed. That's why they give you the manual button to disable the AC if you choose. If it's not humid outside, you can do that and it will still be comfortable.

All cars have had compressor clutches, for 50 years, probably from day one. The compressor is only engaged when needed.
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wrote:

comes on in defrost mode whether you have the AC switch turned on or not. ANd by current model, I'm talking roughly 10 years old or less. Definitely on anything with "climate control " and even some of the dealer installed kits on Toyota did even 25 years ago when I was installing them
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:09:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well I can't exhume my '88 or '95 Lebarons, at least not without a court order and I think I need the agreement of the prior owner.
But I can make some tests on the Toyota. It will take a while because I've been having trouble telling cool from warm lately. That is, the air from the dash (without defrost) felt cool when I thought it should be warm.
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On Wednesday, July 15, 2015 at 6:47:01 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

How about we split the difference and discuss a 1990 Labaron? According to the "tech expert" answering a question in the following thread, it is norma l for the A/C compressor to come on when in defrost mode. I gotta assume it was the same for the 95 since it was later model.
http://www.justanswer.com/chrysler/5wqfg-chrysler-lebaron-landau-1990-chrys ler-lebaron-3-0-v6-when.html#re.v/174/
Maybe I'm reading too much into the statements in that thread, but it sure seems to me to mean that you can't turn off the A/C when in defrost mode.
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:51:25 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Maybe so. I remember now that I didn't have climate control in any of the Lebarons. Because I guess Chryslerr makes a lot of convertibles and doesn't insist that they are the top of the line. (None are cheap, but they don't all have leather seats and climate control, for example.)
But I have to tell you, after 30 years of avoiding cloth seats because I thought they would soak up the rain, I really like them. They dried out in half a day (because the top was only down in the summer, so it was warm) and the seats were the most comfortable I've had. After I had abdominal surgery, the car was more comfortable than the bed or any seat in the house.

That's what I think people are saying.
But it turned out to be easier to test the 2000 Toyota Solara Convertible than I expected. I turned on the defrost and the light went on on the AC button. I pushed the button while looking at the tach, and I could see the speed go down a little, and the AC light went off. I pushed it again, the AC lightwent on, and I saw the engine speed up a little. So I think turuing it off turns it off.
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:51:25 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

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wrote:

Well, I KNOW my '95 LeBaron Mark Cross Town and Country Wagom ran the AC any time the defrost was run, down to about -10C

And I installed hundreds of Toyota AC systems -
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Weren't they great? Most of the imports were POE installs. Once one did a couple it was speed city and flat rate was a winner!
I forget what year it was but Chrysler had a capacity problem on the T&C vans. The owner was friends with service advisor of the local dealership. He let us try to figure it out. IIRC it was the filter/dryer had to be up-sized by about half. Ahh, cool. I think Chrysler made a running change a little later because of it.
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 5:00:34 AM UTC-5, Seymore4Head wrote:

The best thing is remove the battery and SIM card quickly, as most, if not all, cell phones are technically always on (like most things today, it's a "soft" off).
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On 07/13/2015 07:26 AM, bob_villa wrote:

Considering "off", I once measured the electrical power used by a cable box when "off". It was indistinguishable from the power it used when on.
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One of my cell phones would go weeks without needing a charge when off
OTOH, my cordless phones don't even have a switch to turn them off. They last 2 or 3 days now but they'd last 10 days or more if I could turn them off. I'd still hear the ringers on the base station and the western electric phone in the basement.
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 7:26:24 AM UTC-5, bob_villa wrote:

a "soft" off).
Odd thing today, we all went swimming a the local State Park...was in the w ater more than a half hour...then I noticed something in my baggy swim shor ts, you guessed it...flip-phone. Remove battery and SIM, dried it, shook it , blew it out with air and put it in rice...we'll see what happens. micky gave me bad karma...
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 7:44:16 PM UTC-5, bob_villa wrote:

s a "soft" off).

orts, you guessed it...flip-phone. Remove battery and SIM, dried it, shook it, blew it out with air and put it in rice...we'll see what happens.

I see you are all interested in my cell's function after a half-hour submer sion? Well may be not, but it still works...
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 1:37:11 AM UTC-4, micky wrote:

I've been using the rice method for a number of years. I don't recall that it has ever failed me. My most recent use was when the remote sensor for my indoor-outdoor thermometer fell out of its mount and laid in the rain for at least 8 hours. When I picked it up the water literally poured out of it. Luckily, the batteries popped out when it hit the ground so I don't think it was ever powered up while wet.
24 hours in glass of rice and it powered right up and starting sending sign als to the base unit.
The previous time was when I left a cooking thermometer/timer on the deck n ext to the grill. There was water sloshing around inside the LCD display. T he switch was in the On position, but the display was blank. This unit does not time out, so I was a bit worried. I turned the unit off (before even m oving it) then took out the battery, shook out as much water as I could and buried it in rice for a few days. I popped the batteries back in and I've been using it for about 6 months now.
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