wet phone

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I know we've heard this before but here is a first-hand story, at least for me.
A friend writes:
Phone didn't work, even though battery had substantial charge.
At the T-Mobile service center, the rep opened the phone and showed me that it was wet inside. Why? When I turned on the water at the fountain, there was a surge that thoroughly doused my pants and sport jacket. Even though the phone was in my shirt pocket underneath the jacket and was partially protected by a rubberized case. enough water managed to seep in to cause the phone to malfunction. The rep suggested that before I opted for a replacement phone, I should disassemble the phone (basically taking the battery and SIM card out) and immerse it in bowl of uncooked rice for 24 hours. It worked! I mentioned this to a number of people who were aware of this "folk remedy”. Silica gel would even be better as a desiccant, but it is not exactly a household item.
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wrote:

Silica gel works a whole lot better. You can get in bulk.
https://www.sorbentsystems.com/bulksorbents.html
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 01:51:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If anyone should have that, it shoudl be T-mobile or a fix-it shop. Are there any fix-it shops?
For my friend, it was more important to use the rice right away than wait for the stuff to come in the mail.
BTW, I've heard of absorbents, but never sorbents. I'm sure there's a joke there somewhere.
But thanks for the link. I'll send it to him. He won't likely buy any, but I'm sure he's interested.
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wrote:

I have read that the best thing to do if you get your phone wet is to not turn it on. Turning it on while wet could damage it more easily. Use a vacuum cleaner and then bowl of rice.
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 6:00:34 AM UTC-4, Seymore4Head wrote:

Heating the phone with a hair dryer set on low also works, since it evaporates the water quickly....
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On 07/13/2015 08:10 AM, bob haller wrote:

My reservation about all these suggested methods of drying out the phone is that they do nothing about whatever dissolved salts that were in the water, the residue of which could be conductive or otherwise harmful to delicate electronics. My inclination would be to rinse it with deionized or distilled water first, and only then dry it out by whatever method is safest.
Perce
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wrote:

Evaporating the water leaves any disolved solids behind. Absorbing the water with a dessicant leaves less behind, as it can absorb the solids as well.
The secret is to get the battery out as soon as possible, and shake out as much water as possible - avoid "wet shorts" that put voltage where it does not belong - which can permanently kill the phone.
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 12:05:04 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Really? Inquiring minds want to know when the water molecule leaves the circuit board inside the phone, how does it know if it's going to just wander off with the air into the breeze, or if it's going to wind up in the desiccant that's outside the phone so it needs to bring it's buddy solid molecules along? Does it phone ahead? I'm sure I'll now be on Clare's double secret ignore list. Just the facts.
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 12:04:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I have a feeling that even with the sorbant/absorbant, the water evaporates and the increased humidity gets absorbed by the dessicant.
If you could get the desicant to touch the water, it would be different.

I'm sure. Although in my friend's case, the phone was on or he wouldn't have known it wasn't working.
Once my stream flooded and my basement laundry room got wet, and the next day the water heater started leaking, so I thought it was just the first water not evaporating and the laundry room floor stayed wet for a week or more, leading to mold and smell.
So I bought a 50 pound bag of calcium chloride or maybe calcium carbonate? Whichever is a desicant. I put a piece of filigreed masonite vertically in a bucket, with a bunch fhe crystals in one side. And after 12 hours there was 2 or 3 inches of water in the other side (both sides really, but I couldn't see the other side) I woudl pour it out and get more water, and once or twice I added more crystals. And the smell started to go away. But what was amazing is that different steps on the stairs going to the main floor smelled different.
The stairs are carpeted. One step would smell bad and another smelled fine. I would put the bucket on the bad step and in a few days the smell was gone. Of course this makes no sense because the bucket is on the step and my nose is 5 feet higher, where the air from all the steps ought to merge together, unless it doesn't.
Anyhow, I put the bucket on each step eventually, and after a few days each smelled fine and the smell has never come back.
I gave the reminaing 45 pounds to a gas station.
WRT the carpeted steps, only the first riser got wet at all, in fact the water might not have gotten to that room, but there's enough humiidity that once the mold was started, I think, though I didnt see, there was morld in the room with the seps.
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On 7/13/2015 3:18 PM, micky wrote:

Chloride.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 05:43:50 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

So will the AC will have to run int he winter too? Including the full-size compressor? Since the dash is in the passgenger compartment, warmed by the heater?

"The system only runs when drivers turn on the HVAC system."
This is ambigous. If it had said only runs when drivers turn on the AC**, that woudl answer my question, but they include the heat. So if it's cold out and people are using the heat, that means the HVAC system is on.
**I suppose this is what they mean but I just wish people woudl pay more attenttion to what they say.

Why can't they use that semiconductor cooler, with no moving parts, like is used in picnic coolers? Don't those work?
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wrote:

The AC compressor on most vehicles today runs any time the HVAC system is in the defrost mode, unless it is VERY cold.

You mean a Peltier cooler? They work, but are not terribly efficient and can only transfer a limitted amount of heat (cause a limitted temperature reduction)
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 20:58:55 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Good to finally learn about that.
I used to have a friend who built** his own 2-story house near Woodstock NY. **Did much of the contruction himself, though he made at least one big mistake. He used log segments, so that one end showed on the outside and the other end on the inside, but didnt' seem to realize they would shrink when they dried. So there was an enormous amount of caulking, with cement iirc. There are loads of towns in upstate NY like woodstock, even with antique stores and, in the 70's, hippies, but his house had to be in woodstock so that he could tell people that's where he lived.
It was going to cost a fortune to run electric lines so I suggested the cooler, which even in the 70's was advertised in the JC Whtney catalog.
He went with a gneerator instead I guess so he could have light too. :) I forget how well the box that covered it worked.
He was a jerk and I knew it. But I tolerated medium-high levels of jerkiness as long as I didnt' see them often. I brought a date to his xmas party and he asked her all kinds of personal questions that normal people don't even ask people they've known for years. Then he danced with her girlfriend, who was really beautiful, but he groped her while they were dancing and she left.
He was a lawyer. While we were camping, I heard him tell someone he was a wood carver from Woodstock, but had "a straight gig in the city".
When we camped, it had to be in Hippie Hollow, even thogh there were no more hippies there than anyplace else, so he could tell his coworkers that he camped in Hippie Hollow.
We went camping with Rainbow (nothing to do with the R. Coalition) in North Carolina and I've done that before in Pennsylvania, but this time a few thosand people got sick. (The CDC investigated, sent me a long form and in return, later sent me their report on the cause etc.) His date had a 102.6 temperature and her 10-year old daughter had 103.6. I know that might not be fatal but it's not good either**. It took us 40 minutes to get out of the national park, to my car, and he didn't want to take them to the hospital, because he said they'd get over it. I was so glad I was the one with the car. The hospital was on the way home, but 40 miles from the park and it took another hour to get there. As it turned out, they just gave them a lot of water and watched them for 3 or 4 hours, and they did get better in a couple days, but that wasn't a decision for him to make. He got sick later that day and I got sick the next day. Shigellosois I think it was, because they didnt protect their water supply well enough from feces. The other 20 years they didn't make that mistake.
He said she was his girlfriend so it was his decision. I told him that applied to wives and husbands because there's a reason to believe they love each other, or at least are invested in each other, and will sacrifice their own good for the sake of the other's health (What was he sacrificing? He wanted to get back to NYC by 11 so he could have a full nights's sleep before work the next day) but if she died, or if say she got a lung disease and had to move to Arizona, he woudln't move with her. He'd just get another girl friend. We fought from the moutains of North Carolina to Baltimore and I don't think I've talked to him since. Eventually his father and mother died, his other girl friend told me, and they left him rich, or at least a millionaire. .
**We agreed that even though it was July 4th weekend, the stream right there was too cold to put the woman or her daughter in, but years later someone explained to me that we should have wet towels in the strame and applied them to their bodies, especially I think their foreheads and heads, to cool them off. He knew nothing and neither did I, but at least I knew how to drive to the hospital.
When we had gotten to the road outside the park The police offered to call a doctor but it would have taken an hour they said, about the same time it took to drive to the hospital, which of course has more people and more equipment.
And that's the story of the Peltier cooler.
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 11:51:27 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

I started reading this...it became tedious and I fell asleep...zzzzzzz
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2015 12:11:02 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

BIG problem with direct cooling - any moisture in the air in the compartment condenses out on the surface, drains down, and wets your phone. You want cool dried air circulating through the system with the compartment walls WARMER than the air flowing through. That way any moisture in the compartment is absorbed by the moving dry air and evacuated from the system.
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On Monday, July 13, 2015 at 2:29:15 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

...snip...
There is nothing wrong with using the A/C in the winter.
The owner's manual for both of my Hondas (and maybe my other cars too, I don't recall) specifically say that the A/C can be used year round to remove moisture from the vehicle to keep the windows clear.
In fact, the Honda manuals state that the A/C automatically comes on when the Defroster setting is selected.
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On 07/14/2015 09:56 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
[snip]

My first car didn't have that in the manual, but I discovered that it would work better than the defroster when it wasn't too cold.

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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On Tue, 14 Jul 2015 07:56:04 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

It costs money.

That's more important than charging the phone.

Yeah, mine might do that too, but I almost always turn it off.
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wrote:

Except you cannot turn off the AC without shutting off the defroster.
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On Tue, 14 Jul 2015 18:41:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not on my Lebaron or Toyota. Each had/has a separate AC button. Sending almost all the air onto the windshiled stays the same, and iirc the fan speed is within my control.
I suppose it takes longer to defrost without the AC but it still does it.
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