West apartment window heat problem

I live in an apartment in N TX that has a west window that is 7'W X 6'T. It is actually a double window with four panes each. The heat has come early this year and the direct sun on that window makes the entire apartment hard to cool. I was going to have a dark tint applied to the window but the apartment owners forbid that. Is there a website that sells an effective heat barrier, like a pull down window shade that would reduce the direct sun heat? If so, please provide a website and ballpark cost if you know it. I'm not an engineer but it seems logical to me that a tint would be the best because it prevents some heat from ever getting into the apartment???
mike
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Presumably, the owners will not allow outdoor awnings either. Or indoor shutters. So, as a renter your best option is in draperies lined with a light color, kept drawn.
Banty
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wrote:

Solar Screens would be an option, if allowed by the owner. We use these screens in the desert. The fabric has more thread and reduces the amount of sun into the room.
Example:
Serving Houston, Katy, Galveston, Woodlands, Tomball, Sugarland and the Surrounding Areas!
http://www.solarscreensplus.com /
Oren
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James Lewis wrote:

Actually, a reflective film is better than one merely tinted. Nevertheless, Home Depot sells opaque shades in any size. You should be out for $15.00.
If you have access to whatever's outside, put some (large) potted plants between the window and the sun.
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Are the windows functional? (both panes) Shade cloth outside the window (out the top and in the bottom) will shade fairly well. It may not look great, but blocking the sun before it enters the glass is the best option.
Is there a sill outside the window? Perhaps a windowbox with some tall leafy plants can be made to provide some shade.
Just brainstorming.
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James Lewis wrote:

You might want to take a look at <http://www.1windowquilts.com/ . Not cheap for what they are but they work quite well.

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--John
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wrote:

Open the window about an inch, top and bottom. Build screening inserts to plug the holes, if there's not an outer screen. Then plug the window-bay with a foil-covered urethane foam insert, with painted sheetrock glued to the inside.

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/West-apartment-window-heat-problem-114009-.htm cecilgrass wrote:
James Lewis wrote:

Honestly, I would simply use an AC. You could consult an electrician to help wire it in a practical way assuming the windows are functional. I would recommend <a href="http://www.SugarlandElectricians.com ">Sugarland Electricians</a>. Had some similar work done by them in the past and each of the 2 times they were very professional and reasonably priced.        
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