Well water storage tank Problems


The tank is buried in the ground in a 30-year-old system. Water is pumped over the wellhead into the buried tank and then into the basement. The tank is air pressured via a valve at the wellhead. Over a few weeks the tank loses air pressure and becomes water logged. Can I install a bladder tank in the basement and just leave the waterlogged tank in the ground? thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

That's an *extremely* unusual setup.

Maybe. Maybe not.
Is the tank losing air pressure because the air is dissolving into the water, or because the air is escaping through a pinhole leak in the side of the tank? If the latter, it's going to be leaking water too, as soon as all the air escapes.
Or perhaps the air valve itself is leaking. The first thing I'd do is put a little bit of soapy water over that air valve, to test for leaks.
Of course, I'm also wondering how you ever manage to correct the waterlogged condition, if the tank is buried. Waterlogging CANNOT be corrected simply by adding air to the tank. The tank *must* be drained -- completely -- to correct waterlogging.
Yes, you may be able get away with putting a bladder tank in the basement, and leaving the existing tank alone -- but I think you're better off removing the existing tank from the system (not necessarily removing it from the ground, just bypassing it) and adding a new bladder tank ANYWHERE that's more accessible than what you have now.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Who ever said weird is correct. I also have unusual check valve that causes problems at the wellhead. The valve is supposed to let water escape in both directions. I have had it repaired a few times but have given up on it. It only froze when it gets below zero. I have the head covered and run a light bulb on below zero nights. The only problem is when I forget to switch the bulb on. It has been warm in Wisconsin the last few winters.
The pump is 30 years old. I have been wondering how much it would cost to have a well driller excavate below the frost line put in the standard T, reweld the casing and install a new pump? thanks tom
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On 8 Jan 2007 12:27:27 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

Might I suggest a greenhouse thermostat. I got one from Northern catalog pretty reasonable. All you need is an outlet and then plug your bulb into the thermostat - the sensor can be placed right by your valve if you wire things right. It'll come on automagically when the sensor temp gets below 40F (IIRC) and prevent freezing. I plug mine in when fall rolls around and unplug it in spring - beats trying to remember to turn on a bulb when the temps drop.
Later, Mike (substitute strickland in the obvious location to reply directly) ----------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net
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.

waterlogged
by
correct
Actually putting air into the tank by any means will temporarily cure water logging.
Water over air systems usually have some kind of automatic means on controlling the air level. Usually they involve injection (by various means) of much more air than is loss by normal use and some kind of vent that lets the air out when the water level gets below the half way point. The clever student will note that venting the air will drop the system pressure and start up the pump. Thus, air over water systems usually have a minimum of a half tank of water. If the automatic vent stops "venting" below some pressure (say, on the order of 20 psi) when during a power failure and only during a power failure you use the bottom half of the tank.
That's why air bladder systems are so popular: a smaller air bladder system will do the same job of keeping the pump from short cycling than a larger air over water system. But you don't have that extra reserve when the power fails.
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The tank needs to be within a few feet of the pressure switch. So if you put the tank in the basement you have to move the pressure switch there as well.
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On Mon, 8 Jan 2007 18:58:25 -0800, Pat wrote:

I'm curious. What's the reasoning behind your statement?
It's always been my understanding that the pressure switch regulates pressure in the system and the pressure tank prevents short cycling of the pump by compressing some air and storing water - two independent parts of the system. The tank would serve that purpose whether a few feet from the switch or several hundred feet from it. The tank only has to have air in it to be compressed and be hooked into the system so water can enter/leave it. Likewise, the pressure switch will operate the pump based on set cut-on/cut-off pressures and system pressure no matter where the tank is located.
Maybe I don't understand things correctly?
Later, Mike (substitute strickland in the obvious location to reply directly) ----------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net
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