Well Water Pressure higher then 60PSI?

So I have a Pump that can produce more then the typical 60PSI @ 30GPM. I'm drawing from a 5000 gallon tank.
When looking for a Pressure tank I only see ones that have a 40/60 PSI range on them. Though the Operating Pressure is like 110PSI. What is that all about? Can I use my Well-X Troll Pressure tank and a higher pressure?
Thanks, Scott<-
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The only thing I can tell you about that is our experience out at the farm. We ran a pvc pipe line out to one of the barns and cranked it up. Don't remember how much the pressure was but it pipe off where the line came from the tank and turned down into the ground. I don't know if it just wasn't glued enough or what, but after I fixed it, I cut the pressure down to a bit under 60 and have not had a problem since. We have an irrigation system on one of the pastures and I have no idea what that pumps. It's computer controlled and I guess it self regulates. I don't think I'd run a whole house system at 110.
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On Dec 8, 11:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

High pressure is hard on everything, 50 should be enough to live with. I would not want 110lb pressure and a 30gpm leak when I wasnt home, or at home. 43000 gpd will fill a pool-basement quickly.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You didn't mention what the application is but 40/60 PSI is a good working pressure for a home. You get good performance and the various valves etc don't get destroyed nearly as quickly as they would at higher pressures.
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wrote:

The only problem with that is plumbing fixtures are rated at 80 PSI. Your "3 GPM" shower will just dribble when that tank is coming down to 40 to trip the switch.
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On Dec 9, 9:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hmmm... I'm not sure what you mean about dribbling. I completely bypassed my booster pump and pressure tank (set for about 45/60) and put a tank on my hill. I get around 40 psi and that's just fine and dandy. Washer fills up quickly, plenty of pressure for showers and hosing off cars, impulse sprinklers work just fine... No more of that sudden increase in pressure when the booster kicks in.... For that matter I was using a 55 gallon drum halfway up the hill for a while and was only getting about 21 psi and that was enough for a decent shower.
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That's some hill -- tank must be 90+ feet higher than the house to have that much pressure.
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On Dec 9, 9:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

BS. If you are going to answer questions, at least make it something you know about. 40psi will still be giving needle showers.
Harry K
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Actually no.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My well tank is rated at 150 lbs though my pump cuts off at 50.
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Claude Hopper wrote:

I have a slightly different problem. I recently converted from well water to county water. The county pressure is very high and I need to cut it back to around 60 psi. I don't have a pressure gauge in line so I can't see what the pressure is now. How can I cut the pressure to about what I used to have with the pump? Do I need to just close down the valve where the water comes into the house or do I go to the meter by the street and close it down there? Or do I call the water company and have them adjust it? Thanks
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You need to install a PRV (Pressure Reducing Valve) where the line enters the house...or where it enters the property if it branches off to different place. Can't give an estimate on cost but it is a simple thing and shouldn't be a bank breaker.
Closing down a valve will not do it. It might reduce the dynamic (while in use) pressure but the static (no water draw) pressure will build back up to the original.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

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I think I paid around $30 for one a few years back. Home Depot perhaps. Personally I'd call the water company first and see what they say.
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Good point! I have heard of places where the municipal system will pay for one if it is needed.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Thanks for all the info. I will call the counthy water folks to start with and go from there. Chuck
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Harry K wrote:

Its actually good design to have high system pressure and a regulator near point of use. Our local water utility does exactly that with high system pressure and a requirement that you install a regulator.
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George wrote:

I took a look this morning and I seem to have a regulator installed in-line where the pipe comes into the house. It looks to have some sort of an adjustment on it. Is that supposed to limit the pressure? Also the end of the regulator is plugged. Is that ok? If I remove the plug and adjust the regulator does that cut down the pressure? I don't know why the plug is there. A plumber installed all this, last year. Thanks for any addl. info... Chuck
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On Dec 8, 9:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not really enough information. Why do you want that high of pressure?
Pressures over 60psi is not recommended for residential use. Makes for excessive strain/wear on fixtures and gives no real benefit. If the pressure tank were much lower than the residence, then you might need to have a higher pressure there than at the house. You lose .43 psi per foot elevation difference.
Harry K
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