well tank

have replaced my tank and prs. switch.got a 36gal well saver tank at HD,says it does the work of a larger size tank.the switch is 40-60psi. it is precharged and they say not to adjust air pres.But the pump kicks on very often I can see that there is only a cpl. gals. in tank when it shuts off. It seems to me that the tank has to much air prs. in it and the tank get to 60 lbs. with just 1.5 gal. of water in it and is almost empty at 40lbs. the switch allows you to raise the cut in &out prs. witch should I do raise cut in & out ,or lower air psr. in tank.the old tank had achart on it telling at what air charge what the water volume available was this doesn't .is the a standard used to set air pressure.I was thinking that the tank air prs. when empty of water should be around 30lbs. I don't want the pump coming on every time toilet is flushed ect.
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gg wrote:

I once was told that the air pressure should be set at the lower p/sw setting. not sure why, but it works for me.. franbarb
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I assume the tank has a bladder in it that is pre-charged. When I put a new tank like that on my well, the instructions said to be sure the device on the pump that was to add air to the old style tanks was disconnected. If that is the case, you'll have air in the bladder but also air taking up space in the water only section.
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The air charge in the tank needs to be correlated with the pressure switch setpoint. If your setpoint is below the air charge in the tank, then the pump will come on every time you use water. You may need to either lower the air charge or raise the pressure setpoint in your pressure switch. It is usually adjustable by means of a screw on a spring. Ideally, the pump-ON pressure setpoint should be just above the tank-empty air pressure. You can find out what that is with a tire pressure gauge. Do it when the tank is empty of water.
If you want to keep the air pressure charge as it is, then you can do this. With the pump power disconnected, run the water all the way out. Then adjust the pressure switch screw tigher until you hear it click. Then back it out just a little. That way the pump will come on just before the tank goes empty.
Robert Scott Ypsilanti, Michigan
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On Sun, 09 Jul 2006 22:55:53 GMT, gg wrote:

My money says the pressure is too low - mine was precharged, don't recall to what pressure, but it was much too low. This allows the tank to fill, but only empty a little before the pressure dropped below the 40psi cut-in. What happens (assuming 40/60 switch) is the tank fills and pressurizes the air in the bladder to 60psi, you use water and the pressure drops, when the pressure gets to 40psi, the pump cuts in, but the bladder hasn't expelled very much of the water when the air in the bladder expands to the 40psi cut-in pressure. As you probably guessed, the pressure in the bladder should be close to the cut-in pressure - logic would dictate equal, but practicality dictates otherwise.
Whatever the cut-in pressure is set to, the tank should read about 3psi less for it to function properly - don't be to critical about this, but you don't want to be equal or greater than, or much more below the cut-in pressure. I highly recommend a compressor (one that plugs into the car cigarette lighter is adequate) to add pressure - a manual bike pump will give you a good workout before accomplishing your objective.
All tank pressure checks and changes should take place when the tank is empty. Take a tire pressure gauge and measure the pressure in the tank. For a 40/60 switch, the pressure should be about 37psi, if it is less, go ahead and bring it up to that pressure.
You should also check the water pressure after repressurizing the system (if you don't have a gauge already on the water line, now is a good time to install one) to make sure that your cut-in pressure matches the pressure in your tank. Run some water until the pump cuts in and note the pressure. If the cut-in pressure is equal or less than the tank pressure you set earlier, it's now easier to adjust the pressure switch (shouldn't be much) than to drain the tank and make adjustments there. Repeat the run water, check cut-in pressure procedure after any adjustment to make sure you accomplished what you wanted.
All of the switches I've seen are adjustable, look inside the cover for instructions if the pressure isn't correct. Keep in mind that, unless the cut-in and cut-out pressures are adjustable separately (I had a switch that was this way but current one isn't), you will be raising/lowering both pressures, so if you want a higher/lower cut-out pressure, you will have to adjust the tank pressure to match the cut-in pressure.
HTH
Later, Mike (substitute strickland in the obvious location to reply directly) ----------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net
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Michael Strickland wrote:

Good explanation and quite correct. Someone suggested that the old air control valve might still be adding air into a bladder tank. Could happen
Harry K
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