Well Question

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Only one thought. You need an engineer to do the calculations to see exactly what you need. IMO, you have plenty of capacity to supply another three houses too. Be sure you have the right pump setup. It is far cheaper to pay an engineer a few hundred bucks now rather than have to re-do a faulty system a few months from now.
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In this particular application there is no pressure tank. The well pump fills a 1500 gallon storage tank and is controlled by a float valve. A booster pump draws water from the storage tank and supplies water directly to the houses.
It would be hard to imagine the houses drawing more than 30gpm combined at any one time and that number seems well within the capacity of a boost pump.
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
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wrote:

My hose faucet running full blast puts out about 15 gal/minute.
No pressure tank? Does the pump run full time?
Connecting the 2 pipes together before splitting to go 3 ways would help assure that noone gets short-changed on water.
If there is a problem, increasing the pump pressure should solve it. (Bigger pump) I wouldn't expect it. Without watering usage, high demands should be short lived. A pressure tank at your house could solve that.
Bob
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Well, the houses will have outdoor taps, but are prohibited from doing any irrigation. I suppose washing a vehicle could draw the amount you indicated.

When water is being demanded, yes. Thought that was a little unusual but the other houses in the development use the same arrangement with no problems.

That was my first reaction, but now I'm not so sure. :)

That's my backup plan if there's an issue. I'll just put a 1500 gal storage tank near the house and draw from that.
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
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wrote:

So you can't even grow vegetables?

There must be some kind of reservoir to maintain pipe pressure until water demand occurs. Or does the pump run continously if a faucet is dripping slightly.

That should almost never be necessary. This is of course dependent on the "booster pump" at the source being strong enough. You could put a booster pump at your end with a pressure switch to turn on only when the supply pressure gets too low. The storage tank at your end (storage? not pressure, right?) will mean you have to supply all the electricity to pressurize your water - another expense.
You could increase the pipe size from the road to the houses, cutting losses through the pipes, effectively making them "appear" shorter to the pump, increasing the capacity of the system.
The fire sprinklers are probably the determining factor.
Bob
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About 20 years ago my father ran a 2 inch water line from city water about 1.5 miles to their subdivision. Their house and 5 others are served by it. Water pressure and flow can be a little slow at peak times, however they have never had a problem. A 2 inch line carries a lot of water. I would be more concerned with the 1.5 inch line and pressure pump.
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1) Rather than a 2" and a 1-1/2" line, why didn't "someone" just pull the 2" and run a 3" or as large as you can get under the road? When you have two different sized pipes in "parallel" the small pipe usually doesn't make much difference. You could bring TWO 2" pipes to the conduit, transition to ONE 3" (plus) and at the other side have separate 2" pipes to the individual homes.
2) As another poster said, in any case a 2" pipe can carry a heck of a lot of water.
3) I don't quite understand your system but if possible you should have a pressure tank near the wellhead and the pressure should be set on the high side (cut in 50, cut out 70). If you have pressure regulators at each home set at, say, 30 psi you will never "sense" when your neighbors are using water.

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On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 13:44:56 -0700, someone wrote:

not being used for fire hydrants or irrigation. I have seen camp colonies that ran far more than only three houses off 2" water lines.
If everyone wants to stick to their guns, if there were documents (plans, specs) that said there were supposed to be three separate lines and a fixed price to do it, then tough shit on the contractor, they can cut the road lay the lines then patch the road.
But if you are all paying time & materials anyway, then try it as-is and see. I don't see that it is so obvious that a 2" line can't do it. What does an actual engineer's analysis say?
Reply to NG only - this e.mail address goes to a kill file.
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