Well now...

Our builder just charged us $6531 for our well (they took off the $5000 credit allowed fwhen we bought the house...so I only owe them anothe $1531). I no where near expected them to exceed the $5000 for a well. I know the water table is not too far down as there are a few flodded quarries nearby.
The house is in eastern Pennsylvania and I was wondering if anyone has any experiance with the price for a new well.
Thanks, Jay Bird
PS: I am requesting a "well log" or "drillers" report so I can get the depth/materials/etc.
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I doubt that you want to drink what is in those flooded quarries so don't use them as an indicator of how deep you need to go to get potable water. I have an old granite quarries about 500 ft from my house and 30 feet above but my well was still 260 feet deep, I'd have had them drill even deeper but I was afraid of getting salt water if I went deeper.
The information regarding the depth should be inscribed on the well casing cap (perhaps inside the cap.)
I paid $1500 for my well including the pump. It sounds like your contractor found a way to enhance his bottom line at your expense.
RB
Jay wrote:

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RB wrote:>I paid $1500 for my well including the pump.
That is cheap. Way cheap. Tom
Someday, it'll all be over....
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RB wrote:

I scuba dive in one of those quarries. The water is pretty clean (looking, that is).

And there ain't a damn thing I can do about it, I suspect.
Thanks for you reply... Jay

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The fact of the matter and truth is that a well is drilled deep enough to produce the volume of water the building(s) the well is meant to serve, it has absolutely nothing to do with water quality as long as it is visually clear. There is no guarantee of water quality when drilling a well. A water well is nothing more than a hole in the yard meant to collect and store water for future use. The casing is meant to keep water above the water table (saturated zone) from entering the hole. Generally speaking, the water (groundwater water, below the water table) feeding the quarry (a very large man made spring) is basically the same water as in the well.
Gary Quality Water Associates www.qualitywaterassociates.com Bulletin Board www.qualitywaterassociates.com/phpBB2

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Doesn't sound too much out of line. It probably included the cost of the pump, piping to the house, pressure tank, etc. Water on/near surface may not be potable and they may have had to drill deeper. Lots of ways that the cost could be where you say. In my case (don't recall exaclty) my cost was somewhere near 5000 for a 65 ft well in easy drilling but was a turnkey installation, i.e., when they pulled out all I needed to do was turn on a faucet.
Harry K
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wrote:

When we drilled our well in Iowa, we hit at least three shallow aquifers. However, none was big enough to give us the required flow rate and we ended up having to go quite a bit deeper.
It takes more than just the presence of water. No one is measuring the flow rate into the quarries the way they're measuring the flow rate at your well.
Mary
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Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer
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