Well-made, dependable casements -- do they exist?

Like the title says: Well-made, long-lasting casement windows that seal properly for a few decades -- is there (are there) such a thing?
I have an application that would be perfect for casements, and I'd love to have them in there, but I've heard from a reliable, experienced builder that casements -- even from the premium brand-name makers -- won't seal as well as double-hung, and don't remain aligned if there's even the slightest bit of building settlement. In the long run, they'd be more trouble than their advantages are worth.
I've seen casements in some really high-end homes, and I'm sure the decision was based on more than a whim.
Opinions?
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You are being missled. Casements can out perform double hung in air infiltration tests, Mine did, that is why I bought them. I needed windows for a very high wind area. Check manufacturers Air Infiltration ratings.
For settling if it settled that bad double hung would be affected. I could undertand a cheap window hinge sagging. But I have seen many jobs done where the contractors did not use a level.
You probably dont know this but most windows companies void warranties from day one if a window is installed more than 1/8" out of plumb, level or square. I had a job done and knew this was an issue, he was a hack. I got out the Andersen rep and he found 3 windows and one sliding door that did not qualify for their warranty, I had to pay someone else to fix these issues.
Even if a house settled the casement window has leeway, so it would not be affected easily and could be easily adjusted, a double hung is not adjustable that I know of. So If I had a house that would settle, Casements would be a better choise. www.energystar.gov has good window info on what to look for. Consumer Reports did some big window reviews worth looking into.
Most important is the installer, and that you check Plumb-Level - Square on every window before you pay, or you have zero warranty if over 1/8" out. Some manufacturers may be less than 1/8" leeway!
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I think I'd take that guy off the 'reliable' list, as least as far as windows go. My 30 year old casement seals just fine-- and I replaced the basement wall under it, so there could have been a bit of movement there.

I still prefer doublehungs for appearance & ease of cleaning- but I think, if you check an ASHRAE manual, the casement is more energy efficient.
Jim
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Concern yourself with certified ratings, the warrantys fine print exclusions not avaliable until you request it. and checking the install, be there your self with your levels. As far as windows , my pella are crap compared to the Andersen for condensing issues. I learned about CF rating to late, my pellas all condense, the Andersens rarely , that will lead to mold and rot, I have mold on the pellas under the finish. Learn about glass , Andersen has an amazing process that deposits particles as plasma, [ if I remember it right] Glass is not all equal so do research and find a good installer.
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On 11/24/2010 6:39 PM Robert Barr spake thus:

Well, I won't be able to tell you definitively since my time machine is broken, but I just installed a couple of Marvin casements (their low-end "Integrity Ultrex" composite vinyl/wood line) for a customer. From what I can see these should last a good long time and retain their sealing abilities. Jambs (wood) are well-made, frames seem strong and accurately fit, and overall they feel like they're made to last the ages. They're double glazed with low "E" glass.
So far as being affected by building settlement goes, these windows are fastened to the building exterior at the front (outside) of the window by a "nailing fin". They tell the installer not to put any fasteners through the frame (jambs) of the window at all, so it's basically floating from its front attachment, with the rest of the window jamb secured by shims. So it seems that even if the building geometry changes somewhat, the window should retain its shape enough to operate properly.
More than that I cannot tell you.
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OK, thanks for the replies.
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