Well Improvement?

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Don't follow the 1-7 gpm flow rate your initial post complained of then in this situation.
20' of standing water in 12" casing is roughly 100 gal if start from fully recharged condition. At 10 gpm, that's a 10-minute run time.
A test of how long it takes to pump the well down from that initial condition would give a reasonable estimate of recharge rate.
W/ as much storage as you have, simply adding a timed circuit to only allow the pump a maximum duty cycle should seem to solve the problem unless the rate of recharge is significantly different w/ season, etc.
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dpb wrote:
> This well produces anywhere from 1 gpm to 7 gpm and the > rate does not seem to matter if we are having a wet or dry season.
Thinking about this some more leaves me yet more puzzled than before -- is this a recharge rate of some sort, and if it doesn't change by season, then with what _does_ it change and how do you know? While not a huge difference in absolute magnitude, it's a factor of nearly 10 in relative which seems something sizable must be influencing it...
W/O far more info and most of which would be useless to anyone here as no amount of usenet posting can possibly make up for not being on site and familiar w/ the local hydrology, I'll simply note that if this is, indeed a makeup or recharge rate, then in the long run your maximum theoretical output per day is somewhere between roughly 1500-10,000 gal.
Assuming a middle figure of 5 for simplicity, if you're pumping at 10 but recharging at 5, then it would be a net of 5 gpm and the previous 10 min would be closer to 20 and you would net 200 gal/cycle max, and need 20 min to recharge the 100 gal reservoir. That of course, is way overly simplistic as undoubtedly the recharge rate probably decreases as one continues to pump, but that would give you a rough idea of how to come up w/ an acceptable duty cycle as a starting point. Undoubtedly it would require trial and error to ascertain the actual supportable.
As another poster noted, you need to see what your needed output is--unless you're running livestock or small nursery or similar, sounds like you should have more than enough water for a single residence. If not, conservation may be in order... :)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: ...

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http://www.tanko.com/equipment.html
Here's a pretty good overall discussion of issues to consider...
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