well

The pump kicks on all the time. Everytime you flush the toilet or turn on water, the pump kicks on. I replaced the pressure tank. Kicks on at 30, kicks off at 50. Have 35 pounds of pressure in the tank. Need to know is this normal for the pump to kick on so much, and if it will hurt the pump? Thank you very much.
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bookie213277 wrote:

A couple of things, how big is the tank? Is it a diaphragm tank? Yes it will hurt the pump, not so much from running often, but from short cycling which gets it hot. Longer cycles let it cool down from the start-up load and less frequent ones are better as well. If it isn't a diaphragm tank it could be air logged, with too big of an air pocket reducing the amount of water in the tank. Even if it is a diaphragm tank you should check the pressure, it should fall in the range of 29-33 lbs. My well guy suggested a second tank, to promote longer less frequent cycles, and I took his advice.
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That's not right. With the pump set to come on at 30 psi, you should have slightly less than that (around 28 psi) when the tank is completely empty of water. Shut the pump off, drain all of the water out of the tank, adjust the air pressure in the tank to 28 psi, and turn the pump back on.

Correct so far... but after this, you went astray.

Ummm.... no, it could be *water*-logged, with too *small* an air pocket allowing too much water in the tank.
There's no such thing as "too big an air pocket". The pressure tank is supposed to be _completely_empty_ of water at the cut-in pressure.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Thanks for the correction, I haven't messed with a non-bladder tank since I lived at home, & then my dad did the actual work. I do remember him giving it a shot of air from the compressor when he had that problem.
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For what it's worth, I saw this very problem on This Old House one week. As I recall, the pressure tank they diagnosed as being grossly undersized for the house in question. Dunno if this is applicable to your situation.
Yes, such frequent cycling will reduce your pump's life.
I'd also call the person who put the new pressure tank in and get their read on what's going on and to rule out a defective pressure tank.
-- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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bookie213277 wrote:

Your tank is water logged . Doug Miller has given you the correction. So do what he says and you'll be in the ball game. If you do not have a bladder type tank then your going to have to repeat the operation from time to time as the tank will lose its air gap over a period of time and it will have to be replaced. Also as Doug says get the tank air pressure down to 28lbs. Jack
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 19:34:14 -0500, bookie213277 wrote:

Yes, over time, short cycling (cutting on every time you use a little water) will damage the pump.
According to what you have posted, the tank pressure should be about 28 psi, not 35. Pressure tank should be about 2 psi *less* than the cut-in pressure for the pump - 30 psi cut-in pressure = 28 psi tank pressure. To set the system to use the 35 psi already in the tank you'd need to raise the cut-in pressure to 37 psi by adjusting the pressure switch, which I don't recommend unless you're unhappy with the household water pressure.
The reason for tank pressure being lower than cut-in pressure is that you want to allow the maximum amount of water to get into the tank before the pump cuts off. The air then pressurizes the water as you use it - the more in the tank, the more you can use before the pressure reaches the cut-in pressure and the cycle repeats.
Tank pressure is easy enough to set following the steps below:
1) Turn off pump and drain water from tank - draining the tank is *important*, there must be no water in the tank to get a proper setting
2) To lower pressure, depress center of air valve (should look the same as one on your automobile tires) - to raise pressure use a tire pump or compressor to add air to the tank. I highly recommend an electric air pump or compressor as you'll pump a long time on a bicycle pump to accomplish what you want when raising the pressure.
3) Check pressure to make sure it is correct - 2 psi below cut-in pressure
4) Turn on pump
Later, Mike (substitute strickland in the obvious location to reply directly) ----------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net
Please send all email as text - HTML is too hard to decipher as text.
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 19:34:14 -0500, "bookie213277"

Buy yourself a new larger tank with a bladder.
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Its a brand new 42 gallon bladder tank got it from home depot was told it is big enough for my home 3 bedroom 2 bath 4 people living here
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Who installed it? Did they know what they're doing?
If not, it may behoove you to call a well specialist that does.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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On 18 Sep 2006 13:33:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@toddh.net (Todd H.) wrote:

I've pumped them up with a bicycle pump.
Just follow the instructions that came with the tank.
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