Welding Helmets


If you weld, do you always use those welding helmets? I am asking because they dont work in cold weather. They fog up. I had to do a small welding repair in the garage yesterday and as soon as I put the helmet on my head it was fogged up and I could not see what I was welding. Obviously from breathing inside them there is no way to avoid the fogging. I finally took one of those (over the eyes only) torch welding goggles and changed the lens with the darker one from my helmet and used that. That worked fine, and is much more comfortable, This makes me wonder why people even use those large clumbsy helmets. From now on I will probably just use the goggles. The only time I'd see the helmet needed is welding overhead, to keep sparks off the face, but for welding something on the garage floor, who needs that whole helmet, and in cold weather they are useless. I never knew that both types use the same size dark lens. Now I know they do..... Mark
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Has the sunburn set in yet ; ) ? If you do any amount of welding you will look like a lobster. You shouldn't have any exposed skin in the direct path of the flash. But, if you don't mind a little sunburn, rock on. You might look into a auto-darkening hood, sort of like the difference between a typewriter and a computer.
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Eric in North TX wrote:

Or the splatter, yet? (It _will_ happen)
Add a face-crater or two to the red landscape and you, too, can look like the Martian landscape. :)
And, there are venting hoods and acclimating the hood will also help.
Whatever you do as a solution, foregoing full-face protection while welding is a really, really bad idea... :(
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

I finally took one of those (over the eyes

The helment is convenient and here's why. You can flip it up and down with a nod of your head. This allows your to flip it up and down while keeping your hands on the work and most welders do this instinctively.
Welding can be risky and you can't be too well protected. A helment is clearly more protective than goggles. Depending on exactly what task is being performed sparks can fly everywhere. Your head can be showered with sparks. I have many, many holes in my clothing from welding sparks. The helment protects your face and hair from these sprarks.
A bit of fog is not a problem when welding. Welding creates a lot of heat anyway which usually cooks off any fog rather quickly. you carry a bandana in your pocket and can wipe of any fog. When welding, one concentrates exclusively on the weld and the puddle of molten metal that is being created. It is so bright that special protection is required as you have noticed.
It is also bright enough to be seen through a bit of fog. The worker only needs to see the spark and the puddle not the workpiece. the helment can be flipped up if you need to see the workpiece.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Good job tumor boy. Welding helmets are first and foremost for protection from the extremely high UV output of a welding arc. Protection from heat, sparks and splatter are a secondary function.
Welders all over the world work in cold weather without issues and the issue is no different than for motorcycle helmets, diving masks and other protective face gear. Get some anti-fog from your local motorcycle or dive shop and be done with it. Also make sure your health insurance is in place for the melanoma treatment.
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I have welded for 33 years now, so I know of what I speak.
Arc rays burn whatever they touch. Skin, cornea, retina, clothing, anything. You can cover up your eyes, but you will have a nice painful red ring around where it is not covered.
Buy some antifog, or get your helmet set up so you don't fog it. Maybe even breathe through a flexible piece of short hose.
Even if you do it right, later in life, you will have to get about six sin cancers burned off per year.
Steve
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If you don't have anti fog as Pete C. suggested above, wipe some liquid soap solution or shaving cream over the inside lens until you get some. Don't think I ever welded continuously for over 30 seconds so you could hold you breath while you weld - I do that anyway to avoid breathing in all that junk. For me, an auto dark welding helmet is the way to go - YMMV.
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You'll get a serious sunburn if you do much more than 5 minutes worth with just the goggles on. All you have to do is warm the helmet glass and it won't fog.
--
Steve Barker


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