weiser deadlbolt problem

A couple years ago we had a brand new fiberglass entry door system installed - along with a Weiser latchset and deadbolt with a disk lock - one of those you can rekey any time without pulling the cyl. My daughter pulled the key out when it was not in the "remove key" position and the lock would not work or reset. Found that you do NOT want a key that is basically wedge shaped - you want the end to have bigger "teeth" than the base.
Anyway, after we replaced it with a new one, it has worked well - but it has always been a bit "notchy" - sometimes difficult to get the bolt to extend. I took it apart yesterdsay, and when out of the door, everything worked smoothly. Ends up there is a little "toggle" on the bolt assembly that was hitting the wood in the door - I grabbed a bg round file and opened up some space above so the toggle didn't hit any more, and now it is smooth as silk.
Just thought I'd pass it on in case someone else has the same problem.
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it still operates the cyl, you can "reset" the cyl to match the worn key, just like you can reset it to a totally different key. You insrt the "original" key, turn it 1/4 turn to the right, insert the seset pin, pull out the key, insert the new key, and turn 1/ turn left then back to center- and it is reset to the new key - or the worn one..
For my car and truck keys, i ALWAYS keep one virtually un-used original and use keys cut from it. Back when I was Service Manager at the Toyota Dealer we cut keys from code - every key cut WAS a new key.- not a Dupe.
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On 8/15/2014 8:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

products. I think the manufacture tolerances are terrible, and the over all quality is very poor.
Now they have user change locks... I trust those even less. Kwikset was tolerable quality (my trailer home is protected by Kwikset locks). The user change Kwikset, I've changed a couple but I don't like them nor trust them.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca;3272389 Wrote:

People should be aware that when they buy a new Weiser or Schlage lock for their house, the keys that come with it will be stamped with a 5 digit code. Those 5 digits represent the depth of the key cuts in the order they occur on the key profile. Any locksmith can reproduce that key knowing that 5 digit code; he doesn't have to have the key itself to make a new original key for the lock. I expect the same is probably true for other locks, like Kwikset, but I don't have experience with Kwikset or other lock manufacturers to know for sure.
So, if you buy a new lock, take the time to document the key code so that if you ever lose the keys to that lock, you can have new keys made without having the keys themselves for the locksmith to duplicate.
Also, the keys that come with new cars will often have what's called a "blind" code stamped into them. This is a key code that requires a special chart or computer program to translate the blind code into the correct key profile. The charts and programs to decipher a blind code are only available to the car manufacturer's dealerships and professional locksmiths, and they will ask for proof of ownership from anyone that wants them to decipher a blind code.
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nestork

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On 8/16/2014 9:01 AM, nestork wrote:

Kwikset doesn't stamp the depths into original keys. But some Kwikset clone companies do. I've also seen bitting on Yale keys. Some other brands, Sargent comes to mind. It's a good idea to make a record of the code, as you say.
This is also useful when occupant is locked out of the house, and the ### locks don't want to pick. Some times I can get a relative on the phone, and get the key number from the relative's key.
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 08:59:01 -0400, Stormin Mormon

manufacturing tolerances - only a design that does not work with a simple drilled hole for the bolt and minimum size holesaw for the lock unit.. Since releiving the wood to allow clearance above the lock the 4 year old deadbolt is as smooth as it could possibly be.
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On 8/16/2014 6:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I worked with Weiser in the eighties and nineties. I'm guessing they haven't improved much.
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:43:52 -0400, Stormin Mormon

(or better than) the rest.
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On 8/16/2014 8:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've worked on locks made by Weiser, Weiserbolt, Kwikset, Schlage Baldwin, Corbin, Corbin Cabinet, Chicago, Fort, Ace, Dexter, Russwin, Best, Yale, National, Segal, Ilco, Lori, PLS, US Lock, Uscan, and a variety of off brands from Taiwan. There is a chance I might have some understanding of what I say.
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