Weird stuff -- update -- (was Electronic Kenmore refrigerator not working, what does this sign mean)

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Things are getting weirder and weirder. My original post is at the bottom.
I have received the replacement relay and capacitor today.
Installed them (it was a 2 minute job).
Plugged in the fridge.
The compressor happily started working normally, mildly vibrating and indicating in all respects that it is running fine.
Happy after 2 minutes, I turned off the fridge, and reinstalled the rear insulated covering panel and ground.
Plugged in again and I HEARD THE SAME OLD DREADED BUZZING SOUND. Now, the compressor motor would not start again! It busses fomr several seconds and the relay clicks and turns it off.
I am completely puzzled as to why exactly it turned on once, but would not turn on again.
Any idea?
i

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...

type problem. Its never helped, but I keep trying it anyway.
Karl
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That is always my preferred approach. Sometimes it works.
i
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No doubt someone mor knowledgable will have something to add here, but it sounds like the compressor is trying to start against a load. How long was it unplugged while you were replacing the cover? I imagine it should be unplugged at least three ininutes, and probably five. However, I'd also imagine that there would be a timer of some sort to prevent short-cycling. Of course, the thermal protection in the motor would kick in eventually, but my air conditioner, for example, simply will not run the compressor for a few minutes after you plug it in if it had been running just prior to unplugging.
Anyway, I'd suggest that you let it rest a few minutes and then try again.
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On 09/02/2010 05:14 PM, rangerssuck wrote:

We had an older fridge that'd do this any time the power blinked -- and we live out in the boonies. We learned to unplug it for a few minutes and plug it back in.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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I seem to remember I was told that you should keep it unplugged 1/2 hour. Karl
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On 9/2/2010 8:03 PM, Ignoramus28169 wrote:

Take the cover back off and see if anything changes? Mebbe fridge got shoved into the wall, and the cover got bent, and is making something not work?
I'm no fridge expert, but when something stops working when you put the lid on, that tells me the lid is somehow binding something up or shorting something out.
--
aem sends...

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re: "when something stops working when you put the lid on, that tells me the lid is somehow binding something up or shorting something out."
In a much earlier life, I used to install and repair Radio Shack TRS-80 workstations. My company also used the Storage Expansion Unit which could house up to three additional 8″ drives as shown here:
http://www.trs-80.com/wordpress/trs-80-computer-line/model-ii /
These expansion bays were notorious for not working once you put the cover back on. You'd repair the unit or add a drive, test all three drives with the cover off and then install the cover and the 84,000 screws that kept it on. Invariably, one of the drives (it would be random as to which one) would no longer be accessible.
You had to loosen screws, tweak the cover, slap the box, whatever, to get it working.
With hundreds of these workstations installed in everything from offices to chemical processing areas, you can be sure that we did a lot of bench work trying to determine what the problem was in an effort to make our on-site work easier. We never figured it out and were thrilled when they started replacing them with the original IBM PC.
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Many of these kinds of things end up being cracked connector solder or chips that fail when heated. BTDT
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re: "chips that fail when heated"
We know it wasn't heat since the problem occurred immediately after securing the cover and could be fixed by tweaking the case.
re: cracked connector solder
Maybe, if it was a manufacturing defect since it happened on so many, many units.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

They cut one corner too many by tin plating the edge connectors, then plugging them into connectors with gold plated contacts. At one time there was a special connector sold that you soldered to the tin plate, and had gold plated contacts to mate with the ribbon cables.
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wrote:

re: "At one time there was a special connector sold that you soldered to the tin plate, and had gold plated contacts to mate with the ribbon cables."
Trust me, I know all about the many corners they cut! ;-)
However, how would this particular connector issue be impacted by the installation of the case? The case had no connectors, it was just a metal shell.
P.S. Before installing the TRS-80's, we opened up every keyboard and ran a wire from the circuit board ground to the plastic case. Before we did that, weird things would happen when the user touched the keyboard.
The worst was seeing the disk drive light turn on and knowing that the program and/or data disk was now corrupt. The least was hearing the daisy wheel printer print out a single character.
We had some users that were so paranoid about their data that they wired a grounding bracelet to the sprinkler system and would hook themselves up before they touched the system.
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On 9/3/2010 12:46 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Just a guess but tightening the crews could distort the case enough to put stress on the drives, altering their alignment thus they (especially with the old stepper-motor drives) no longer have proper track alignment. Solution would be to leave the drive mounting screws on one side a little loose so they support the drive but don't put any load on it--a little Loctite would keep them from working loose in service.

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Many times we just left half the screws out altogether!
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Some cases put pressure on one side of the ribbon connector. The modification extended it outside of the case. I repaired a lot of early computers, too.

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DerbyDad03 wrote:

The problem hasn't gone away.
We've been farkin' with a CD duplicator for a month. It would randomly fail to eject a CD. Replacement of the CD drive with a new one didn't help. We finally got it to work flawlessly but when we tightened the screws holding the drive in place, back to the same symptom.
Turns out, tightening the screws distorted the drive (made of old beer-can metal).
Loosening the screws somewhat returned the duplicator to perfect functioning.
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Or the screw went too deep and needed a washer (or a shorter screw). May have bound a pivot point or track/rail.
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On 9/3/2010 2:37 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Snort. I used to see that issue in brand new PCs just out of the crate- hard drive had 2 screws on one side, but only one on the other. Thought it was a production boo-boo, so started checking all the other ones as I was installing the memory upgrades and tape drives (yeah, this was a few years ago), and they were all like that. Only using 3 screws was a real common trick on early CD drives, before they got the hang of designing them cheap but stiff.
--
aem sends...



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On 9/3/2010 9:06 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Back in the late 70's I worked for Tandy repair and most of the trouble with their equipment was caused by cold solder joints. The connections made with plated through holes on the circuit board were always suspect.
TDD
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Ignoramus28169 wrote:

The lit symbology indicates that the internal temperature doesn't agree with the set point. From your description, I'd say that the compressor has an internal problem (stuck valves, galled bearings, dessicant particles in the compressor, etc). Most consumer grade refrigeration compressors aren't servicable, meaning that you need to get your checkbook warmed up for a sizeable deduction from your bank account.
That said, there are a couple things for you to do. First, remove the back cover, leaving the ground wire unconnected, and see if it kicks off again. If it continues to run, connect the ground wire to the chassis. If it kicks off when you connect the ground wire, then you have to find out where the ground fault is. Most likely, that will be inside the compressor. Don't use it in this condition; it is a lethal weapon without the safety ground connected. If you have an AC clamp meter, measure the current on the hot wire going into the compressor. It should kick up to 10A or so when the compressor starts up, and quickly dropping down to its normal running current of a few amps. If the current stays high after a few seconds, that means that it isn't starting normally. The overcurrent relay tripping in a few seconds indicate that fact. In any case, the compressor is highly suspect.
--
David
dgminala at mediacombb dot net
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