Weird problem with cable TV reception on one TV.

One TV in the house gets interference on the higher channels (50 and up). This has been happening for over a week now. One minute it's fine, the next there is nothing but "snow," and static noise. There seems to be no cause of this, and it does not effect any of the other TVs, 2 of which have premium cable and 3 that have basic, just like the one with the problem. There was interference on a radio that plugs into an outlet, but not with a radio that runs off batteries, even though they are in the same place. The radio problem, however, was bad about a week ago, but then the interference just stopped. This TV problem goes on all day and night long. We have no new appliances or anything like that. Any ideas?
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Have you tried a different outlet? Maybe it has a bad ground.
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Try plugging this TV into a different wall outlet, preferably on a different circuit. If the problem goes away, replace the outlet. If the problem remains, swap this TV with one of the ones that isn't having a problem. If the problem follows the TV, then replace the TV; if not, then repair or replace the cable to the problem location.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:05:42 -0700, monty1945 wrote:

Make sure both F connectors (tv and splitter) are crimped on properly and tight. Make sure the splitter has no unterminated outputs. Channels 35+ are susceptible to outside interference in the VHF range like a high power POCSAG (pager) transmitter. If everything is ok have the drop and splitter replaced with triple shielded cable. If that doesn't fix it the problem could be in the tv.
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On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 17:05:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

I have a similar problem with one AM radio station. In the office, one radio works all the time pretty well on this station 50 miles away. The same day or night.
In the bedroom, another radio works fine at night, but during the daytiem it either gets a lot of interference, or on other days it is totally impossible to hear.
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Also with apparently 5 other TVs and probably lots of splits along the way, you may have a marginal signal left on the cable.
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 07:26:44 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

These are both using antennas, and only 50 feet from each other.
It's a real pain to move one radio, but I guess I could move the office/bedroom one to the bedroom and see how it works there.
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We had the same problem in a large house we were remodeling.
The cable company (Time Warner) provided us with a booster for the whole system.
It worked like a charm.
If I remember right t cost between 80 and 100 dollars.
Bargain really.
They also advised us not to buy splitters from the home centers (ie Home Depot or Lowes) as the quality of those is not so good.
Hope this helps.
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Unless the radio interference exactly coincides with the TV problem, I think you have a TV tuner problem. Try running the signal into an old VCR and use that as your tuner and see if the problem goes away.
Bob
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wrote:

Possible interference sources include aircraft and ground radar (near airports), cellular phone towers and cell phones (the new GSM band phones are particulary nasty), abandoned antenna amps (possibly in neighbors' houses) that may have been disconnected from RF cables, but are still powered up. Also power lines, (the intensity can vary with the current load throughout the day.)
Then there are the old fashioned sources of interference, electric motors, vacuum cleaners, paper shredders, can openers, etc.
The timing and freqency can be clues to what is causing the problem. For example, periodic interference every few seconds or so can be a radar unit. Often these come on at the same time of the day.
A ham radio operator with a spectrum analyzer can help you track this stuff down if you are motivated enough.
AM Stations come in different varieties. Some of them switch power or change radiation patterns at specific times defined as local sunrise or sunset. Weak stations usually come in only at night when the ionosphere is hundreds of miles higher.
Beachcomber
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I wouldn't expect interference to have this effext. "One minute it's fine, the next there is nothing but "snow," and static noise"
Bob
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