Weighing down trash cans

Page 4 of 4  

wrote:

It makes a whole lot of sense especially if the company starts losing garbage cans because of the wind.
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"They" don't "lose" them.
"You" do.
And "you" are responsible for them when they come up missing for whatever reason.
I doubt that they are going to let it slide when "their" trashcan goes missing because "the wind blew it away."
I believe that will be on your next bill.
Steve
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Bolt a pair of these http://www.agmfg.net/twoholestraps.html
or these
http://www.agmfg.net/conduithangers.html
to the can
Use a 3 - 6 inch piece of rigid pipe for what ever weight you want.
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approach is to use bungee straps for the lid, and to bolt a steel plate onto steel rails on the bottom of the can. I can permanently bolt a couple of steel rails to the inside of the can's bottom with threaded holes so that the steel plate can be easily attached or removed when not needed. I'm not sure if the steel plate will be attached on the inside (plate on top of rails) or outside of the can (bolts through the bottom of the can)...I need to check the clearance on the outside bottom of the can and see if the attached plate will fit. Outside is preferable so I don't need to reach inside to detach the plates. I can plug the holes with a bolt and rubber washer when the plate is not attached.
Thanks all for your help on this!
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mike wrote:

There isn't a perfect solution to this. I think that if you do that, you need to keep in mind the way the center of gravity will now be placed in an empty can: the bottom. It's the opposite of the way some older SUVs and vans were built and that was top heavy. A good gust of wind may cause the can to flip over anyways, but I do think the can would be prevented from traveling down the street at least.
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That's where I want the COG to be. If I'm not mistaken, the higher the weights are placed, the easier it will be for the wind to knock it over. That's why SUVs had (have?) a tendency to tip over...a higher COG.
Regardless, my solution is not ideal, and I'm open to suggestions to make it better. :)
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mike wrote:

Well, I am just thinking that if your trash can is anything like mine, it's not a normal geometric shape and so the center of gravity would have to be adjusted accordingly. In my setup, the top is larger than the bottom and it is a slanted can with two metal handles and two wheels.. like a wheelbarrel almost. I would look at a building a box to block the wind and make it easy to disassemble in the non-windy seasons.
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Mine is tapered, the top being wider than the bottom. I'm pretty sure that's to distribute the weight of a can that is full so that it is more balanced (I've learned that the hard way when I loaded some construction debri on the top of the can with a bunch of lightweight stuff on the bottom...it nearly tipped over when I moved it). Lower the COG would be beneficial in what I'm trying to deal with the wind, and being able to remove the weight and raise the COG back would be beneficial when it's not windy.
I have to put my trash cans on the street, so I can't build anything there.
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