Weed whackers you've hated

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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

My Shindaiwa T270 kicks butt, and will do truly scary things to heavy brush when loaded with a good (or even a dull) Sandvik brush blade. Shindaiwa is one of the only about three brands the pros use.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Echo. Hands down. I've been using an Echo straight shaft for seven years - no problems. My own residential yard (1 acre), trim around the perimeter mostly. I should probably change the spark plug for the first time 'bout now ;-) I bought an Echo leaf blower at the same time. It's stood up and performed w/o a hitch to regular weekly use as well. Both gas models.
BTW, I've had 2 Ryobi rechargeables in the past. Key word *had*. Never again.
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anything with the word Ryobi in its name.
dickm
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on 8/27/2007 8:59 AM JoeSpareBedroom said the following:

Any whacker with an auto-feed head that has to be bumped to advance the string. If it gets stuck, it may take up to a half hour to take the head apart, unstick the line, and put it back together. I replaced my auto-feed head with one that takes 6" pieces of strings. The pieces get pushed into the the holes in the outside of the head and are locked in by a one-way clip. To change, pull the ends of the old strings out from the center of the head, and push new strings in from the outside of the head. It only takes seconds to change. Of course, you have to shut off the whacker to do this. I have a reel of string meant for the auto-feed head that I cut pieces off, rather than buy pre-cut string. When I go to weedwhack, I take some extra pieces in my pocket.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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OK - I remember inventing some new obscenities while dealing with one of those auto-feed things years ago. I think they were meant to be used in a grass-free location where the mechanism would never get debris inside. :)
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Shindaiwa has a new auto feed head that is supposed to be vastly easier to reload and more reliable. There is info on their site.
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The bump feed on my weedwhacker has behaved perfectly for the almost 15 years I've had it. Bump it on rocks, dirt, logs, gravel, roads, hydro poles, fence rails, stray kids and wildlife[+]... The only times I have to open it is when it runs out of string. It gets about 1 1/2 hours work every 2-3 weeks on some fairly heavy stuff out in the country. The sawblade gets reserved for trees ;-)
Mind you, it is a landscraper grade (FS85) Stihl.
Has never needed service, always starts with < 5 pulls - even after leaving it full of gas over the winter. The previous WW a Homelite whose motor gave up the ghost in < 3 years on much lighter work.
[The FS85's bump head is almost bigger than the motors on some WW's ;-)
Reloading is somewhat obnoxious (getting the ends started), but you get the hang of it.
Recommended unit. But it is _not_ cheap. I didn't want to repeat my experience with the Homelite.
Our tree service uses one of these (D handle, not bicycle) with a chain saw head for branch lopping up to about 15'. Nice unit. Hard on the arms tho.
[+] Well, not wildlife.... Or kids either... just kidding.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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willshak wrote:

No need to shut off the trimmer if it's got a proper clutch. Just keep a good grip on the head while changing the line, and if by some freak event the motor starts to spin up just drop the thing. They don't come up to speed instantly to begin with, and certainly not if you're holding the head. It's not like it's a sharp chain on a saw that will cut you with the slightest movement, the line has to be close to full speed to really do anything. OSHA and the CPSC of course wouldn't approve of this technique, but who cares.
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