"We kept Wal-Mart out of our town!"

Page 2 of 12  


Too subtle for my own good. Yeah, we signed out but we stayed around because the hospital said we couldn't leave until charting, etc., was caught up but we couldn't stay on the clock. The "Bonus" was (up to) 3 years worth of overtime plus interest when someone got pissed off about something and turned them over to the Department of Labor. The DoL disabused them of the thought that this was legal in a way only the Government can (g). BTW: I have since left the place, but they had started to do that at least three other times since then until some of veterans reminded them of what happened the last time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed 20 Aug 2008 05:44:17p, Kurt Ullman told us...

I once worked for a family-run company where I usually worked 11-12 hour days. They had us sign blank time cards, which i learned later they were filling out for 8 hours. I was once given a raise, but it was taken back after two weeks "because they had hired an additional person (the owner's sister) to help in the office". When that happened, I went home for lunch and never went back. I immediatelyr reported them to the wage and hour commission. After they investigated, I and all the other employees received back pay for all the overtime we had worked for "free".
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
locally wall mart isnt welcome:( ross twp works hard to keep it out. one ime buying a site and building a park just so wallmart couldnt locate there
killbuck a nearby location had a terrible landslide during construction. wallmart decided the site isnt suitable to build anything, and sued the developers.
millions of tons of rock slid onto a major highway and rail line blocking it for over a month. site still isnt stable. it should of never been approved to stat with.
I shop at wallmart occasionally but they are far away, with the price of gas its not worth it....
hope they build one close by.
but wouldnt buy their so called fresh meat. too much preseratives
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Redelfs wrote:

So do the signs reach out and prevent this or are they there for show?

For good reason, it costs them almost nothing. Ask any vendor how returns are handled. Someone can purchase an item and literally destroy it and haul it back to the store. Even though there were no defects Walmart simply dings the vendor and makes them eat the cost.
Still, there will always be the customer that is

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What part of "Management is adamant about it" don't you understand?
I had clocked-out once and, while on my way out of the store, encountered my Assistant Manager. *I* stopped and spoke with him about my work schedule. We chatted for about five minutes. Prior to going on my way, he asked if I was "on the clock". When I told him I had clocked-out, he advised that I should go to personnel and have my time CORRECTED as I would have otherwise worked off the clock. That's good enough to convince me that they are serious about the issue.

And it sure makes for good customer relations.

Welcome to the (capitalist) party, pal.
No one is forcing a vendor to do business with anyone, Walmart included.
As for your contention that the customer can "literally destroy" the product and get an easy return is simply untrue.
There are many returned products that have been simply opened and are returned for various reasons. Given today's theft-resistant packaging, it is nearly impossible to open a package without rendering it unsalable should it be returned. Such returns (among others) are returned to the vendor for repackaging. Defective merchandise is likewise returned - as it is by ANY retailer.
A customer with a purchase older than 30 days, that has proven defective, is directed to the manufacturer (vendor?) for warranty adjustment. Walmart is not involved in these cases.
Merchandise that is obviously used or "virtually destroyed" is not accepted as a return, even for in-store credit.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Redelfs wrote:

All of it. I do understand how big corporations typically work. When they get caught doing something rotten they make a big point to put up posters and hold coffee clatch meetings while quietly telling managers just don't get caught next time.

So the end justifies the means. So you are saying it is a good thing that they screw their suppliers?

Again the end always justifies the means? You are just trotting out the same nonsense everyone uses to defend Walmart. If you don't agree that morality should be set aside then somehow you are anti-capitalist and a Hussein Obama supporter.

Sorry no. Lots of evidence how Walmart has a free tool rental service.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

WM doesn't hold a gun to anyone's head. The contract is clear and many people have walked away content. It is hard to screw someone who entered into an agreement voluntarily (unless one is a hooker, then it is a requirement).

There is no ends and no means. Every dealing with WM is a dealing voluntarily entered into by both sides. Just because the results offend someone's sense of equity after the fact (and largely not those involved in the deal..which I find very enlightening) is hardly WM's fault. It isn't like WM is able to sneak up on people any more and surprise them. WM has been well known for years for how it works with vendors. Hardly the only one that does it, either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A small manufacturer can hit the jackpot overnight with a WM contract, there is a constant flow of vendors traveling to Arkansas for an evaluation by WM buyers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

I never considered that but I don't doubt it. Having your [widget] appear on a Walmart shelf virtually guarantees vast exposure. Having Walmart FEATURE the thing would likely "bury" a small vendor in orders.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I suspected as much. You would do well to consult even the lowliest dictionary for elucidation.
IIRC, Walmart was fined BIG TIME for wage and hour violations related to the practice many years ago. As I understand it, I am liable to be fired if caught working off the clock. Given I PREFER to be paid for my time AND wish to keep my job, I won't be testing their policy.

I believe you THINK you understand.

Ahhhhh. Are you cynical about everything or just when it comes to mean and evil BIG business?

In this case, yes.

No, YOU are saying that. I adamantly (oops, there's that word again) deny that they "screw" their suppliers. No one is FORCED to do business with Walmart.

Not always. But, in this case, yes. Complying with a contract or the terms of an agreement can be a bitch but, after all, it IS a contract or agreement - which requires - as the word implies - an AGREEMENT.

One person's nonsense is another's common sense - and obvious fact. As for defending Walmart, forget it: They don't need it in ANY case and certainly not from me. Your baseless prejudice against an American success story is obvious and quite revealing.

"Somehow" at least. You'll need to explain that one to me - a dyed-in-the-wool capitalist and anything BUT a Obama supporter.

Unless you are implicating yourself in this baseless charge, can provide empirical evidence of the practice or, as am I, you are an "insider", I don't believe you. There. That was easy. :)
...and thank-you for shopping at Walmart! <smirk>
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting that nobody ever thinks that maybe the greed of the SUPPLIERS has something to do here. They see the great big numbers WM could order and start salivating to the point where the figures become unreadable but they sign anyway.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 21:45:56 -0500, Jim Redelfs

That's good to hear. I've wondered about that. Of course even then, it's a lot of work for the store, paying the shipper, the vendor, and I hate to do that if I could have figured out somehow that I didn't want it without opening it up.
Usually I use a band saw to open up one side of a welded plastic bubble pack, so it looks pretty good if I have to return it. Would that be resold as I returned it, or shipped back for repackaging?
When there is cardboard that is stapled, I open the staples and then if I have to return, I reuse the original staples, putting them through the second piece of cardboard one leg at a time, and bending the legs down by hand. Sometimes I use my own stapler.
BTW, I make a point to buy already opened packages, to encourage vendors to accept already opened packages for return. (because I know if they are hanging from the hook but never sold, it will leave a negative taste in the mouth of the manager.) Now this can have problems. I bought an already-opened, then taped shut, car adapter for a laptop compputer and when I got it home, it was missing one of the tips that was supposed to be included. I wanted to return it for other reasons, and was afraid the clerk would attribute its absence to me. But she didn't look closely and she took it and gave me cash in return. This was the only time I thought I might get burned by buying open stuff, but I didn't. (I like to pay cash so I get a cash refund, instead of wondering if the credit will actually reach my credit card account.)
I also make a point to buy dented cans, even if the price isn't reduced, because why should they take a loss because someone, employee or customer, dropped a can? (Not bulging out cans, which probably contain poison, and I've never seen for sale.)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My work station is directly across from the clock/alarm display. It is amazing to watch the occasional customer that methodically opens the carton of literally EVERY model (there are about 4 or 5). Sometimes they select one and take it away, often not. Sometimes they are able to get it all back into its box properly, often not. Given this particular example, simply as an ordinary consumer, I wonder what they discover about the product having opened it that was not apparent from the outer packaging.

You are probably among rare company. I regularly use an X-Acto<t> knife for MY convenience but never go to your extent.

Well, that depends: If the buyer was YOU, it MIGHT be resold. Good chances are it wouldn't sell. Most customers will reach behind an apparently previously opened package to take a "new" one. The previously opened package will languish on the shelf or peg hook while the "repaired" package stays behind. The constant handling of the repaired package worsens its appearance and, after a while, it is usually returned to the vendor. Most times, when charged with the disposition of such an opened package, I'll simply "claim it out" and immediately send it back, dispensing with the usually fruitless "game" of placing it back on the shelf or peg hook for a while.

I occasionally do the same if I can do so with confidence that the product is as good as new. However, I seriously doubt that we are doing any favor to the retailer. There is a well-honed process for returning and repackaging such item. Your contribution would keep but a single item out of a very large "stream".

That is an EXCELLENT reason to NOT do what you do.

You were fortunate that the returned package was not closely inspected for "completeness" by TWO, successive clerks.
If an opened package that contains several parts or unique parts (electronics comes to mind) of which the returns clerk is unfamiliar, s/he is supposed to summon a clerk from the department that sells the item for their inspection of the it and approval of the return - that the package has all its parts. Occasionally, as you have discovered, this is not always done.

Yours is an admirable practice but, I suspect, not practiced by many. Obviously, if the product is on display, the retailer hopes it will sell. They are not surprised, however, when it often doesn't.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Aug 2008 04:37:11 -0500, Jim Redelfs
[snip]

Sometimes the most important features are hidden (particularly on equipment like DVD recorders where connectors and cables matter). Packaging often seems designed to hide the important things.
BTW, the last item I found like that was one of these ATSC tuners (that the $40 coupons are good for). I wasn't going to buy one without knowing if it had a baseband output (so as to not have to degrade the signal by passing it through RF). The outside of the package said NOTHING about that, the inside was hidden, and the display unit was tied down so I couldn't see the side with the connectors. One sale lost.
[snip]
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When that happens with me, I find a salesperson and ask if I can see the insides.
Mark Lloyd wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Aug 2008 09:25:56 -0700, Samantha Hill - remove TRASH to

Any they actually let you? Many just look stupid when asked things like that.
Anyway, that complicates thing, and it can be easier to find a source on the internet.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Lloyd wrote:

Yup, they do, but I always explain why I need to see the inside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I worked in the Electronics department, I was occasionally asked by a customer if they could open the carton. I usually assisted by opening, then re-closing, the item they were interested in.
Some stuff, like cordless phones, are contained in such tight (efficient? green?) packaging that it is often difficult to properly re-contain the product once it is opened. Other merchandise is virtually "locked" inside a vacuum-formed and seam-welded package. Opening this type of container requires virtually destroying the package, usually rendering it unsalable.
In these cases, particularly if I am familiar with the item, before agreeing to open the item, I will do my best to inform the customer of the package contents and/or answer their questions that caused them to ask to see inside.
"No sir, that printer doesn't come with a USB cable."
"I can tell you from experience that that particular model of cordless phone system does NOT lay flat against the wall when wall mounted."
"Yes, Ma'am, that digital camera comes with everything you need to shoot 8-12 photos. But, you'll want to purchase a memory card."
More and more packaging contains a [What's In the Box?] label or description, answering most questions, cutting down on the need to inspect the inside of a pre-packaged item.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 07:35:28 -0500, Jim Redelfs

Please be aware that this is actually a very complex act, which some people have trouble with.

Yes. I know some people don't like returning those things.
BTW, the last thing I returned was a VCR, and that was in a regular box.

I'd probably get the wrong answer, maybe from some salesperson afraid to admit to not knowing. The common alternative to looking stupid.

I already have multiple USB cables around. However, the presence of one in the box would be a clue the printer supports USB (the same way a wall-wart in the USB hub box indicates it's a powered hub).

I do wish there were more knowledgeable salespeople.

My (camera) was like that. It uses SD cards and came with a very small one. Also, it lacked rechargeable batteries.

A lot do. They can still leave out important info. How about a photo of the BACK of the device (often more important than the front, as it shows connections)?
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Lloyd wrote:

I understand that, but if, for example, I can't listen to the volume of an alarm that an alarm clock makes, I don't want to buy it, except possibly if I get a guarantee that I can return it if it's not loud enough, but I would prefer to know how loud the alarm is before purchase. A lot of "Loudest alarm" alarm clocks have unbelievably quiet alarms.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.